Solar The Grand Solar Minimum (ORIGINAL)

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TheSearcher

Are you sure about that?
But then you have Bill Nye actually complaining to Tucker Carlson that we missed an ICE Age because of Global Warming. Being a Scientist, How the hell does he think an average rise in average World temperature by 1*c is worst than a than a 20*c temperature decline?

Carlson asked Nye to what degree human activity has accelerated climate change. Nye at first appears not to understand the question and then tries to deflect it. Then when pressed he says that human activity is 100% responsible for the alleged catastrophic acceleration of climate change. Nye makes the claim that human activity has changed things so much that we “almost certainly” avoided another ice age. When asked when that ice age would otherwise have occurred, he says that that isn’t relevant.
Bill Nye is a creepy ahole.
 

TxGal

Day by day
Sorry all, been working outside in the garden and pastures most of the day, madly trying to plant and cut weeds before the next line of storms come in.

For those who don't know yet - and I just learned this myself - Krakatoa erupted massively today, up to 50K feet. Here's the post on the Main (I'm sure Adapt 2030 and Ice Age Farmer will do podcasts on this):

 

TheSearcher

Are you sure about that?
Sorry all, been working outside in the garden and pastures most of the day, madly trying to plant and cut weeds before the next line of storms come in.

For those who don't know yet - and I just learned this myself - Krakatoa erupted massively today, up to 50K feet. Here's the post on the Main (I'm sure Adapt 2030 and Ice Age Farmer will do podcasts on this):

Diamond at Oppenheimer Ranch has it:

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xZ_wYPTsVh4
 

Martinhouse

Veteran Member
TxGal, I have only seen about Krakatoa on Oppenheimer Ranch Project so far. He's been doing lots of very short videos which are about his gardens and are very enjoyable.

There was mention a day or two ago about the Russian Kamchatka volcano erupting again in a big way, too. Shiveluch is it spelled? Something like that.

IAF will probably do another one soon. DuByne has been doing a lot of the interview type videos, and I don't really care for those.....I don't find them all that useful or informative, with too many interruptions and drifting off topic.
 

Seeker22

Veteran Member
Sorry all, been working outside in the garden and pastures most of the day, madly trying to plant and cut weeds before the next line of storms come in.

For those who don't know yet - and I just learned this myself - Krakatoa erupted massively today, up to 50K feet. Here's the post on the Main (I'm sure Adapt 2030 and Ice Age Farmer will do podcasts on this):

I want to plant sooo bad, but I always wait until after the Easter storms. If I jump the shark, I get hailed out, or the rain washes the seed away.

It has been wet and cool here and it is perfect working weather. I have gone on a seek and destroy on the weeds.

As for the volcano, 50K is high enough to cause problems. I suppose Haarvaard is still working their spraying program to put fake clouds in the atmosphere to cool us down? That along with the volcanoes could give us a year without a Summer. Until it happens, I won't spazz. The full sun in high Summer is more worrying to me than a few clouds.
 

ktrapper

Senior Member
If anyone might be looking for a extreme cold weather sleeping bag, right now Wiggys has a really good sale going on. I have used their bags at -40 outside on several trips out on the trapline in Alaska, extended hunting trips for winter caribou etc etc. We swear by them.
I just ordered their Regtangular -60/80 bag. It’s normally $375, on the webpage it’s showing $250, at checkout I got it for $225.
If I am not mistaken, as is it’s rated at -60, if you purchase the FTRSS over bag separate it goes down to -80.

Several times my son and I camped with the other Scout Dads and sons who had their - -40 Chinese made bags. They were always the ones up at 2am stoking the fire because they couldn’t get warm or stay warm. My son and I always slept a good distance away from them jokers. They always wound up with burnt holes in their bags and clothing from the fire embers. Moiture build up inside their bags and not wick away. Wiggys bags wick the moisture away. They put extra insulation around the feet. I have crawled in my bag with moist cold socks and moist underclothing from sweat and everytime wake up dry and warm.

Just in case anyone is thinking of a good bag in the north country. Also if you depend on the power to keep your heat going you might think about something like this for your home, we carry ours in our vehicle in the winter.

Just search for Wiggys Sleeping Bags. I am in no way affiliated with them. Just real world extreme cold experience.
They are made in the USA.

Crazy times we live in.
 

Seeker22

Veteran Member
Yep, the Easter storm hit around 3AM. Hail, high wind, and heavy rain. It is chilly this morning. The sun is out now and will be a pretty day.

I am expecting the weather to get cold again, so will focus on root crops and winter stuff. Peppers and tomatoes will just have to wait.
 

TxGal

Day by day
Very windy and cold here today...not liking those north winds....

Adapt 2030 has a new podcast out:

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YsqCnr8vwyM


Mega Frosts Slam Europe with a Looming Food Crisis (963)

Run time is 10:46

Late season frosts and snow tore through Europe since the beginning of April destroying all crops that had flowered due to the early warm temperatures for the third year in a row. This year there are labor shortages and supply chain bottle necks to add to the looming food crisis across the globe.
 

TxGal

Day by day
Ice Age Farmer has a new podcast out:

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z0tivnr2GS0


NO MORE MEAT: Plants Close "Indefinitely"

Run time is 17:56

Smithfield warns of meat shortages after closing their Sioux Falls plant indefinitely, offlining 7+% of USA hog production capacity. Our food production is being systematically dismantled in a controlled demolition of the life support system of civilization. NOW is the time to start growing food for your family and community and spread the word -- NOT cede total control of our food supply! ALIGN with local farmer/ranchers & producers (and become one!). Support community operations however you can. Start learning and growing now.
 

Jubilee on Earth

Veteran Member
Oh my gosh, I just popped onto Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds' website to see how they were holding up. This is where we usually get our seeds, and we've had great luck with them. This is what is showing now:








Thank you for your patience!


Due to an unprecedented increase in order volume our website and farm are temporarily closed to restock inventory and disinfect our workspace. We have scaled back our operations and staffing to ensure the health and well-being of our employees, our customers, and the community at large. We understand that during these trying times food security is more valuable than ever. Our remaining crew here on our Mansfield, Mo. farm is diligently working to deliver your orders and restock the shelves. We will be back online as soon as possible! If you have questions about your order email us at seeds@rareseeds.com.

Thank you for your patience with us, and for the belief you share with us that gardening makes us all more human and more whole.

We will Be back online Monday 4/13/2020 at 4:00pm CST.


Yep, I placed an order with Seed Savers Exchange back on March 17, and still haven’t gotten my order. This is a message they sent me on April 8th:

Thank you for your order with Seed Savers Exchange.

Here is an update, thank you for your continued patience as we work through all our existing orders:

The State of Iowa—in accordance with the Centers for Disease Control guidelines pertaining the COVID-19 pandemic—has issued strong directives that we are working to adhere to at Seed Savers Exchange in order to help prevent the spread of this disease

To ensure that our staff can maintain the recommended six-foot social distancing as well as follow other guidelines, we had to temporarily close our operation for three days so that our team could reconfigure workflow in our buildings at our Heritage Farm headquarters

Seed Savers Exchange has a small but extremely dedicated fulfillment team. And while Heritage Farm is a beautiful place to work, it also presents challenges during this pandemic as we have limited buildings and spaces in which to spread out the work of processing and filling the unprecedented number of seed orders that we’ve received.

Thank you again for supporting the work of Seed Savers Exchange to save and share open-pollinated seeds. Please know that we are working diligently to restock our varieties and fill and ship orders just as fast as we can, as we keep our staff and our community as safe and healthy as possible.

Orders placed prior to March 31, 2020 will experience a shipping delay of 2-4 weeks from March 31, 2020.

Take care and again, thank you for your order and your support as we work together for the common good.

Seed Savers Exchange
 

Seeker22

Veteran Member
If you buy seed outside your climate zone, you will have trouble with sprouting, suceptability to diseases, reduced harvest, etc. In other words, seed from plants grown in the extreme North of the country or Canada will not fare as well when planted down South in hot weather. And vice versa. I know there is a rush on to get seed (any seed!) just try to get from growers who are in similar climates as you. You'll be doing your plants a favor.
 

TxGal

Day by day
Wow to all the seed reports, all the way around. There must be a huge number of people gardening that weren't before. DH and I started talking about expanding our raised bed garden. Last year we picked up gosh, I think 7 galvanized steel raised bed planters from Kotulas. Finally finished filling them late this winter, still have a few seeds to get in.

But, when we started to think about adding yet another row - not just due to the Corona virus, I'm still watching the GSM weather and volcanic activity for potential problems down the road - late last week Kotulas still had the beds we used in stock 36" - 48" long. Literally the next day, gone. Can't even place a back order for them. I haven't seen them anywhere else.

With luck, they'll come back in stock later this year, this fall or winter even. If so, we'll get more.
 

Martinhouse

Veteran Member
The hen that was trying to set about a month ago is trying to set again the last few days. Since I've been reading about all the packing plants closing down, I think I'll let the hen raise some babies. I've decided this because they seem to be changing their announcements from closing the plants for deep cleaning, to "closed indefinitely". I can put mam han in my extra large pet carrier, which is big enough to put some dust bath dirt and some food and water in, and then when the chicks hatch I can find a safe place to put her and her children until they are big enough to mix with the main flock.

I read on Ice Age Farmer's Twitter page that an organization, Beef Farmers of Canada, is asking their beef and dairy people to hold back their culls for a while. Not sure what this means. Is it telling them to not flood the packing houses or is it telling them to keep back some breeding stock, to not give it all up? Wish I knew.

Last night I got sick. I can't describe what happened except that it very much resembled what our member here, Torah Tips, described as his first day of illness that hit him last week. I'm sure this must have been something else, as I haven't been anywhere since March 3rd, plus I'm feeling lots better today. Only remaining is a headache, shaky legs and intermittent light fever, which I get all the time for a couple years now and I think it's from my chronic Lyme Disease. Anyway, I hope it never happens again, because I don't think I've even felt that horrible in my whole life.
 

Seeker22

Veteran Member
The hen that was trying to set about a month ago is trying to set again the last few days. Since I've been reading about all the packing plants closing down, I think I'll let the hen raise some babies. I've decided this because they seem to be changing their announcements from closing the plants for deep cleaning, to "closed indefinitely". I can put mam han in my extra large pet carrier, which is big enough to put some dust bath dirt and some food and water in, and then when the chicks hatch I can find a safe place to put her and her children until they are big enough to mix with the main flock.

I read on Ice Age Farmer's Twitter page that an organization, Beef Farmers of Canada, is asking their beef and dairy people to hold back their culls for a while. Not sure what this means. Is it telling them to not flood the packing houses or is it telling them to keep back some breeding stock, to not give it all up? Wish I knew.

Last night I got sick. I can't describe what happened except that it very much resembled what our member here, Torah Tips, described as his first day of illness that hit him last week. I'm sure this must have been something else, as I haven't been anywhere since March 3rd, plus I'm feeling lots better today. Only remaining is a headache, shaky legs and intermittent light fever, which I get all the time for a couple years now and I think it's from my chronic Lyme Disease. Anyway, I hope it never happens again, because I don't think I've even felt that horrible in my whole life.
One of the meds for COVID is the same for Lyme. It doesn't surprise me that some of the symptoms would match as well.

As for the cull cattle, sounds like all of the above. They don't want to overwhelm the meat packers, they definitely want to keep some breeding stock even if it is considered inferior (some is better than none).

I am starting to see the Great Divide. Farmers, ranchers, and citizens who are going along with this new program and those that see what is behind the curtain and have decided that a GSM is more of a threat than bucking the system to keep their food sources intact. When enough people get to this point, the kid gloves will come off, and we will be treated to the harder version.

My suggestion is to push that envelope. Make them show their ugly. Keep learning, keep growing crops and ranching, no matter if it is one animal and a window garden, or large scale. You are responsible for your own safety, food, shelter, medicine. To allow the .gov any control of that at this point is perilous. There are too many little tyrants out there.

I am glad you feel better, Martinhouse.
 

Martinhouse

Veteran Member
Thanks, Seeker22. I can't raise large animals, but I can certainly do chickens. That's why I wondered if I should go ahead and let that hen raise a bunch and do all the workd for me. Especially since it looks like I won't be finding rabbits any time soon.

Wonder if I should call the vet and the store that was selling rabbits, and offer to take returns? I do know that often people get those cute little chicks and bunnies for their kids for Easter and before long they find out it was a big mistake for more than one reason.
 

TxGal

Day by day
That's a great idea, Martinhouse! I'm glad you're feeling better....even the sniffles is enough to scare just about anyone anymore.

How's everyone's weather for tonight? Today's date is historically our latest freeze on record. Tonight we're getting down into the upper 30s overnight...hopefully not close enough to test the record low...I'm going to have to cover our tomato plants.

The GSM seems to be alive and well, even though it's been largely eclipsed by the coronavirus news. I would sure hate to lose our tomato plants, everything is pretty much sold out around here, bedding plant-wise.
 

ryken

Contributing Member
Hello! I don't post much, but what I heard today from the Ice Age Farmer concerned me. Kinda worried about the future and being able to get meat. And get this, I'm a vegetarian but the rest if my family isn't. Ha! I cook everything, just don't eat it. Wanting to purchase a deep freeze and stock up for them. Just trying to stay ahead of what I believe is coming.
 

Martinhouse

Veteran Member
TxGal, I'm feeling better, but just going out to the chicken pen and doing the eggs and hauling fresh water just about did me in. It's times like this when part of me wishes I live in a nice clean little two-bedroom apartment.

But I would miss my kitty and my chickens and I while I wouldn't miss the noisy neighbors who seem born to waste gasoline on 4-wheelers up and down a long driveway all weekend, I would HATE all the other people around me in an apartment complex.
 
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Seeker22

Veteran Member
Thanks, Seeker22. I can't raise large animals, but I can certainly do chickens. That's why I wondered if I should go ahead and let that hen raise a bunch and do all the workd for me. Especially since it looks like I won't be finding rabbits any time soon.

Wonder if I should call the vet and the store that was selling rabbits, and offer to take returns? I do know that often people get those cute little chicks and bunnies for their kids for Easter and before long they find out it was a big mistake for more than one reason.
If you have a broody hen in these times, let her raise some chicks. I think offering to take returns is a great idea, but tell them what you want so you don't get a type you can't use. It would be a shame to be buried in Mini Lops when really wanting Giant Checkers.
 

TxGal

Day by day
Amarillo, TX forecasted to get snow overnight tonight....I think that is true of OK, also...good heavens. This from a few days ago (planting season should be soon up that way, I would think):


Powerful storm to dump heavy snow from Rockies to Great Lakes

April 11, 2020 by Robert

Blizzard conditions possible. Bitter cold could challenge previous record lows. Happy Easter, everyone!
________
11 Apr 2020 – “Major Storm to Impact the Central and Eastern States this Weekend,” the National Weather Service warns.
A significant surge of cold Canadian air will surge southward and southeastward unleashing bitterly cold air and heavy snow over the northern tier of the country.

By Saturday evening, much of the northern Rockies into the northern High Plains will be enveloped in snow as temperatures plunge into the teens tonight. This could challenge record lows over western Montana Sunday morning with lower wind chills.

High temperatures will also be well below normal from the Rockies into the central Plains with temperatures during the day below freezing from Billings to Denver to Valentine.

Winter storm watches, warnings, and advisories are in effect for areas of Montana southeastward to Nebraska then northeastward to Minnesota/Wisconsin for later Sunday into Monday for the next part of the storm.



During the daytime, snow will largely target Montana, with accumulating snow expected in Great Falls, Billings and Bozeman.

Falling temperatures and snow will expand south and eastward from Saturday night and into Easter Sunday morning.
In the Denver area, temperatures are forecast to drop into the lower 30s on Easter Sunday along with 1 to 3 inches of snow possible during the day.

Similar conditions are expected along much of the Colorado and Wyoming Front Range and High Plains on Sunday.

Heavy snow and localized blizzard conditions are possible across parts of the Midwest.

Double-digit snowfall totals

Widespread double-digit snowfall totals are forecast across the Upper Peninsula of Michigan from Sunday night into Monday.

Marquette, Michigan, could see some of the highest snowfall totals from this system, with 12-18 inches (30-45 cm) predicted.

Accumulating snow will continue to target the Upper Peninsula during the day on Monday.
Ain’t global warming grand?

WPC's Short Range Public Discussion
Powerhouse storm to supply bitter cold, heavy snow from Rockies to Great Lakes beginning this weekend
 

Martinhouse

Veteran Member
Seeker22, I'll take New Zealands, Satins or Californias. Tractor Supply had Lion's Head rabbits this year and I'll take those if there's nothing else available. Guess I should get on the phone tomorrow.
 
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TxGal

Day by day

Hard Freezes Hammering Italian Orchards

April 11, 2020 by Robert

“Apricots, peaches, plums, kiwis: in some cases, the damage is of 100%.”
________________


The wave of night freezes affecting much of Italy goes on. In the north, the situation has reached an unprecedented level, with 8 hours below zero on the night of April 2 and lows of -6 °C. Even the anti-frost systems are struggling, because protecting an orchard at these temperatures is not easy.




Davide Vernocchi, president of Apo Conerpo, is dispirited: “With these temperatures, this defense system is in crisis. We are talking about 5°C, 6°C degrees below zero in some areas of the province of Ravenna. Apricots, peaches, plums, kiwis: in some cases, the damage is of 100%.

There is a lot of concern on the top fruit front as well, including Santa Maria, Carmen, William and Abate pears,

As for apples, the Fuji variety registered the biggest damages; in many cases a loss of more than 50%. Gala and Pink Lady have suffered as well.


The frosts will not stop
 

Martinhouse

Veteran Member
Kinda looks like this is already starting to be the third year in a row with terrible crop failures.

Thanks to everyone who is posting things on this thread. I've been feeling crummy and have rather fallen down on the job lately.
 
The hen that was trying to set about a month ago is trying to set again the last few days. Since I've been reading about all the packing plants closing down, I think I'll let the hen raise some babies. I've decided this because they seem to be changing their announcements from closing the plants for deep cleaning, to "closed indefinitely". I can put mam han in my extra large pet carrier, which is big enough to put some dust bath dirt and some food and water in, and then when the chicks hatch I can find a safe place to put her and her children until they are big enough to mix with the main flock.

I read on Ice Age Farmer's Twitter page that an organization, Beef Farmers of Canada, is asking their beef and dairy people to hold back their culls for a while. Not sure what this means. Is it telling them to not flood the packing houses or is it telling them to keep back some breeding stock, to not give it all up? Wish I knew.

Last night I got sick. I can't describe what happened except that it very much resembled what our member here, Torah Tips, described as his first day of illness that hit him last week. I'm sure this must have been something else, as I haven't been anywhere since March 3rd, plus I'm feeling lots better today. Only remaining is a headache, shaky legs and intermittent light fever, which I get all the time for a couple years now and I think it's from my chronic Lyme Disease. Anyway, I hope it never happens again, because I don't think I've even felt that horrible in my whole life.
Corona and Lyme. Could be interesting. Hope you get better.
 

Martinhouse

Veteran Member
Profit of Doom, the form my Lyme took was to ramp up my immune system to the point where any new meds or herbals caused a strong allergic reaction within ten to twelve days. This is why I had to stop taking antibiotics for it and also why the following year I could not take the meds I needed to knock the blastomycosis I picked up. I don't dare take anything new or even anything I haven't taken for a long time. To a certain extent, this applies to foods, too. I will say that from my cautions every flu season for many years, I have not caught it even once. However, I'm not going anywhere at all any more with this latest pestilence. I just hope I get to feeling better on my own so I can work in my garden.

I have had Lyme for 28 years and the blasto for 27 years. Not fun, but I'm grateful that my earlier life was relatively healthy. My poor sister caught Lyme when she was in her mid-twenties and her life has been hell all this time. She didn't get all the allergies, but by now she is almost totally crippled from the resulting rheumatoid arthritis. Even on my worst days I can think of her and count my blessings. And believe me, I do!
 

TxGal

Day by day
Yep, I'm getting concerned again about the planting season due to bad weather (there are a few videos that didn't transfer over):


Iowa cities set Easter snowfall records with Ringsted receiving 11 inches

Philip Joens
Des Moines Register
Mon, 13 Apr 2020 18:39 UTC






Iowa weather: Some cities set Easter snowfall records Sunday

Iowa weather: Some cities set Easter snowfall records Sunday
Several northern Iowa towns saw record amounts of snowfall this Easter Sunday.

Ringsted, Iowa received 11 inches, according to the National Weather Service in Des Moines. Rock Valley received 7 inches. Hull received 6.5 inches. Rock Rapids received 8.3 inches.

Nearby Sioux Falls, South Dakota got 5.2 inches, the most snowfall on any date in the city dating back to 1893,
according to the National Weather Service in Sioux Falls. Sioux City got 3.7 inches, an April 12 record, and the second-most snow in recorded history there on Easter.

Winds gusts also hit more than 50 mph Sunday at airports in Ottumwa, Ames, Marshalltown and Des Moines, according to the NWS.

Wintry weather continued into Monday morning: It was 19 degrees in Ringsted while Des Moines saw temps of 25 degrees.

This week will be mostly sunny, but cool, according to the National Weather Service in Des Moines. Highs in Des Moines will be just below 50 degrees Monday through Thursday and hit about 53 degrees Friday, according to the NWS.

Northern Iowa will see highs just below 40 degrees Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday before highs bounce up to about 41 degrees Thursday and 49 degrees Friday, according to the NWS.


DOT camera view today on U.S. Highway 18 near Algona.




 

TxGal

Day by day
Please go to the link for videos:


Snowflake

Storm system leaves foot of snow in northern Wisconsin


Star Tribune
Mon, 13 Apr 2020 20:18 UTC

Southern Wisconsin is under a wind advisory as a powerful storm system that dumped more than a foot of snow in northern Wisconsin leaves the state.

The spring storm Sunday into early Monday left 12.5 inches (32 centimeters) of snow in Merrill, 9.1 inches (23 centimeters) in Rhinelander and 7.5 inches (19 centimeters) in Eau Claire.

The wind advisory posted through Monday evening is for 25 mph to 30 mph winds, gusting to 45 mph.

The National Weather Service also warned that weekend rain may push several rivers above flood stage this week.

Source: Associated Press



 

TxGal

Day by day
Please go to the link for graphics/videos:


Spring storm dumps nearly a foot of snow in southern Minnesota


Chris Nelson
kimt.com
Sun, 12 Apr 2020 19:48 UTC

A spring storm dumped nearly a foot of heavy, wet snow in southern Minnesota, causing crashes and spinouts for travelers who chose not to stay at home because of the coronavirus outbreak.

The National Weather Service reported nearly 11 inches of snow at Elgin and about 10 inches at Wabasha and Oronoco.

Winds gusts in excess of 35 mph were reported.


The Minnesota Department of Transportation said troopers were dealing with crashes Sunday afternoon especially along Interstate 35 south of the Twin Cities, I-90 between Albert Lea and Rochester, and U.S. Highway 52 between Rochester and the Twin Cities.

One fatal crash was reported in Olmsted County.
 

TxGal

Day by day
There are several more articles on the snowstorms on Sott.net. Most are difficult to bring the graphics/videos over.

Martinhouse, you haven't been slacking off, you just have a lot at home going on as do we (as you know). You must take care of your health, me also and I'm also dealing with DH's health concerns. And when you and I (and others) add in animal, garden, and just regular chores, time quickly becomes short. You take care of yourself! There are many others who can post when they have time, too.

With all of us doing what we can, when we can, we'll keep the thread going....it just may get a little behind sometimes :-)
 
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Martinhouse

Veteran Member
TxGal, thanks for the encouraging words.

I don't plan to stop being careful, but I am sick to death of hearing about nothing but Covid-19. Since there's nothing more I can do about it, I'm going to just keep my gate locked and try not to dwell on it so much. I'll try to concentrate on home, garden, and animals and go back to thinking about the GSM, which is something I can do something about.

I despair of others being careful in their own behalf as well as mine. I sent a toaster oven up to my sister Saturday when the handyman left. Today I asked if he carried it and the two pails of rabbit manure I sent her and she said "yes". I asked if she sanitized them really well after he left. Dead silence. Then she said "I didn't even think of it." I really cannot understand how someone who claims to be so stressed out over the entire situation could forget something as important as that. This guy has two kids and a wife at home, but he works in a school kitchen managing the preparation of those meals they send home to children. He's obviously some one to take caution around and she didn't even think of it. Now I won't want to touch anything she might drop off here for as much as a month, plus I'll worry about her, too.
 

TxGal

Day by day
Trying to bring a twitter post over from IAF, not having much luck. Here's the article he's posting.


Chicken company to cull birds as processing capacity plummets
By Leah Douglas April 12, 2020

With a 50-percent workforce decline at poultry plants owned by the Delaware chicken company Allen Harim, the company told poultry farmers last week that it will begin killing chickens in the field to reduce pressure on its remaining workers during the coronavirus pandemic.

The move comes at a time when farmers in other parts of the country are letting food rot in the field because they cannot find buyers for it or cannot process it in time, even as food banks are scrambling to provide services to scores of newly unemployed Americans.

“Over the last two weeks, Allen Harim’s plant attendance has continued to decline and is now at 50 percent normal operation,” reads a letter sent from the company to its contract poultry growers on April 8. “When we started noticing the downward trend in attendance, we reduced the number of eggs set and chicks placed. Unfortunately, reduced placements will not make an impact for another six weeks, and with the continued attendance decline, and building bird inventory daily, we are forced to make a very difficult decision.”

The company will begin “depopulating” — killing — flocks of chickens to reduce the number of birds being sent to the plant, according to the letter.

Allen Harim contracts with 220 farmers, according to its website, and employs more than 1,800 people. The company did not immediately respond to an interview request.

In its letter, the company assured farmers that they would be “fairly compensated” for their birds. But there is the potential that farmers would lose money compared to what they typically make for a flock, says Craig Watts, a former contract poultry grower.

Watts says that when he grew under contract for Perdue, if depopulation occurred due to an act of God, like a pandemic, farmers were paid according to how old their chickens were when they were killed. But even if the chickens were nearly ready for slaughter, the payment could be just 50 percent of what farmers could expect to make normally.

And disposing of dead birds takes time and could also cost farmers money, says Watts.

“In my experience, when the company comes and puts a flock down, the farmer is responsible for disposing of all those chickens,” he says. On a typical four-barn chicken growing operation, a farmer could have nearly 200,000 chickens on the farm at a time. Disposing of even a percentage of that many birds would be “tremendous,” he says.

Disposing of the birds would likely involve composting them inside the chicken house, according to Watts, which could take as long as six weeks — the length of time that a chicken farmer usually takes to raise and ship an entire flock.

Watts says that the situation at Allen Harim reveals that the highly consolidated meat supply chain is vulnerable to major disruptions.

“Big is fragile. We’re seeing it now,” he says. “When you have a problem, you have a big problem.”

Chicken companies employ more than 20,000 people on the Delmarva peninsula, which encompasses part of Maryland, Virginia, and Delaware, according to the area’s chicken lobby group, Delmarva Poultry Industry, Inc. Local news outlets reported earlier this month that the companies, including Allen Harim, were enhancing sanitation practices in response to the spread of Covid-19.

The company posted to Facebook on April 9 that it has put protections in place for workers. “These measures include face masks and temperature checks,” the post reads.

In response to supply chain disruptions caused by the spread of Covid-19, the National Chicken Council is seeking federal assistance for chicken farmers. In a letter sent April 10 to agriculture secretary Sonny Perdue and Vice President Mike Pence, the group, which represents the country’s largest chicken companies, asked for USDA to use its discretionary funds provided by the Coronavirus Aid, Response and Economic Security Act to aid chicken farmers.

“These cutbacks are not the fault of the farmers or chicken processors, but instead are merely a reflection of truly unprecedented and trying market conditions due to COVID-19,” wrote Mike Brown, NCC president, in the letter. “We expect processors to stand by our family farmers during this time and to honor their contracts, however we urge USDA to provide targeted aid to these producers through resources available to the Department.”
 

Martinhouse

Veteran Member
TxGal, I read that about culling chickens earlier and I'm glad you brought it here.

The article makes me glad I decided to let my hen set her nest. She had six eggs under her and I put a whole lot more there. And while Barred Rocks probably aren't a real good meat bird, I think (not sure) that they might be considered an older type of dual-purpose bird.

Plus even a stringy old hen could be treat for a special occasion if it were the only meat available. And that's what it would be for me.

I'm beginning to wish very badly that I had a dog, one that barked when anyone came around, but there's really just no way to find what I need right now. Do I have to make lots of noise traps out of fishline and pyramids of empty vegetable cans so that I dare to sleep at night if hungry people start sneaking around here?
 

Martinhouse

Veteran Member
Just went to check for eggs. I now have two hens setting on that nest and between them they have 14 eggs plus whatever got laid today.

I think tomorrow I need to get out the giant pet carrier and fix it up for a house for them. By tomorrow I'll probably be able to tell if that second hen is serious about setting or if she just wants to lay her own egg there today. But I can't let this go on for three weeks as is, because that would waste too many eggs that would never get a chance to hatch.
 

TxGal

Day by day
There's a post on the main this morning about frost in Arkansas:


I had to cover our tomatoes yesterday evening, we were supposed to get down to 36 with a frost possible. Still haven't seen our actual low yet.
 

TxGal

Day by day
Adapt 2030 has a new podcast out:

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yk1A6hOfBeo


Re-envisioning the Global Economy 2020-2023 (Bob Kudla 1/3)

Run time is 20:28

Bob Kudla of tradelikeagenius.com and David DuByne from ADAPT 2030 discuss the current state of global agriculture, economy and how yields across every country are declining and what to expect as we move into 2023 with a brief interlude to the biggest crash since the Roman Empire.

•Digital communications vs. face to face
•Home Delivery Services
•Staycations
•Local vs International manufacturing
•Food supply chain from farm to field
•Coming off lock down first countries and states economic advantage
•Elective surgery
•Locusts in Africa, Middle East and China 2020
•Greening deserts across the planet
 
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