Solar The Grand Solar Minimum (ORIGINAL)

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TxGal

Day by day
Our farmer's market opened up this week and it was an amazing success! Due to the corona virus we switched to an on-line ordering and drive by pickup on Tuesdays and Saturdays. Several dozen member farmers notify the administrator what products they have to offer, announcements are placed on the webpage and orders/payments taken. Pickup is restricted to a 2 hour window twice a week. We enjoyed the highest sales success we've had in the past four years.

Success!!!
Excellent! I have a hunch your success will continue :-)
 

TxGal

Day by day
I'm a little confused about the joint David DuByne/IAF podcast! Here is what is showing on Ice Age Farmer's page:

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6I-EsZUL3Ho


The State of Global Food Production - Adapt 2030 + Ice Age Farmer Livestream (mirror)

Run time is 1:35:35

David Dubyne of @Adapt 2030 and Christian of @Ice Age Farmer livestream, Friday April 17th, 2020 to discuss where we go from here, now that "Global Food Shortages" are appearing in the mainstream media.
 

TxGal

Day by day
Here's a new one from the Oppenheimer Ranch Project:

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bGRe8PoCOfE


Southern States Face Giant Hail and Tornadoes - Record Cold and Snow - Yellowstone Uplift - Lyrids

Run time is 11:09

After Five Cold Weather Records, Could This Be Winter’s Last Stand? https://cbsloc.al/34JqFZ0
New severe weather outbreak looms for South just week after 131 tornadoes confirmed in region https://abcn.ws/3adeJji
Southern states face giant hail and tornadoes for the second weekend in a row https://cnn.it/2xvAJZx
Snow falls across parts of Southern New England in April https://bit.ly/2VDfYD8
Ann Arbor blanketed in springtime snow https://bit.ly/3cudYDX
SNOWFALL ANALYSIS FROM THE LAST 24 HOURS https://www.weather.gov/crh/snowfall
Severe Weather Outbreak Possible Across The Southern U.S. On Sunday https://www.weather.gov/
CMC Model Total Snowfall https://bit.ly/2VIr6Pf
Worldwide Volcano News https://www.volcanodiscovery.com/volc...
Yellowstone landmark's weird movement finally explained https://bit.ly/3crUsI5
Recent Crustal Uplift in Yellowstone National Park https://science.sciencemag.org/conten...
Magma Intrusion and Volatile Ascent Beneath Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.c...
Incredible satellite image captures erupting Krakatoa volcano https://www.thesun.co.uk/tech/1140860...
Lyrid Meteor Shower Returns https://weather.com/en-CA/internation...
 

alpha

Veteran Member
I was just reading an article on zero hedge regarding the shortage of seeds etc. I figured I'd mention that a year ago we couldn't find black bean seeds anywhere locally so we figured we'd try planting a bag of dry black beans that we saw in the super market. To make the story short, every one of them sprouted and grew very well. I suspect that we could also do that with Navy beans or Soldier beans.

Another source of seed is from those left over Fall decorations - Indian corn. Our affection for Indian corn is based upon its resistance to insects. We have been planting those kernels every year for decades, selling decorative arrangements and grinding excess kernels for flour. We love corn muffins and corn bread so nothing is wasted. Folks might also consider the obvious... keep seeds from every year's crop of squash, tomatoes, cukes etc. and join with neighbors to have a seed swap! Build a root cellar to store your potatoes and other root crops such that every Spring you'll have seed potato sprouting with the warmer weather.

Since we raise our greens in a high tunnel, as the Summer temps rise above our ability to vent, they go to seed and we retain them. Come Fall they are replanted for late Fall and early Spring harvests. Perhaps we take the term 'frugality' to unreasonable heights... :hmm:
 

Martinhouse

Veteran Member
TxGal, thanks for posting so many important articles!

After reading about all the meat plants closing and about how the vegetables are going to be gone by July when they should have lasted until October, I've been eying every single container I have in piles here and there around my place, with the idea of planting as many things as I can in as many containers and pots as I can find. If I have to I'll skim dirt from the abandoned chicken run to fill them all. THAT should grow some great things, if things are going to grow at all!

I'd be even happier if my handyman had not hauled off half of my supply of rabbit manure and dumped it in a ditch, but I have to stop thinking about it because the stupidity gets me so upset...that and the futility of getting things done properly when one has to count on others.

Yesterday I finally got outside and worked until nearly dark - several hours - and finally got most of my poor neglected bedding plants planted. It rained overnight the perfect amount to set them in! It's supposed to start raining again this afternoon and I may try to do one other important thing outside before I'm forced to stay inside for a day or two. I may force myself to get the garden hose hooked up. It's so heavy and awkward I'm dreading it, but will be glad when it's finally done. My sis offered to help, but she got lonesome and decided to do some visiting a couple days ago, so I had to decline her offer.....my gate stays chained!

A tiny bit of good news to no one but myself. I was only able to find Roma tomatoes in those expensive single pots at my feed store and this was after I'd decided to stop going to town at all. So I bought three pots, and one has two plants in it. Well one plant got knocked over last week so I took the broken tip, made a good clean slant cut where it had broken, and put it in water. In a few days it had tons of roots growing out of the stalk, so I went and took two cuttings from the other plants and today they are both rooting. So I have seven plants instead of four. After all have grown bigger, I may take more cuttings just because it's important to to me to plant as much as I can this year.
So the three plants I paid $3.79 each for are already seven plants and I bet I'll be able to at least double that a month from now!
 
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Martinhouse

Veteran Member
Alpha, I have grown several types of grocery store beans over the years and there are always a few 1 lb. bags of various types in my freezer. I also keep a selection of sprouting seeds in the freezer for the same reason, and also, in the fridge, at least five pounds of potatoes from a grocery store that show the beginnings of healthy sprouts.

I only ever plant one type of bean in any one year, so I can always save pure seed, but I'll plant any type of red potato anywhere I can find a place to tuck in a few more. I found seven volunteer potatoes so far this spring, from the little marbles I missed when I dug up my pathetic crop last year. (Hope they do better this year!)
 
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alpha

Veteran Member
Alpha, I have grown several types of grocery store beans over the years and there are always a few 1 lb. bags of various types in my freezer. I also keep a selection of sprouting seeds in the freezer for the same reason, and also, in the fridge, at least five pounds of potatoes from a grocery store that show the beginnings of healthy sprouts.

I only ever plant one type of bean in any one year, so I can always save pure seed, but I'll plant any type of red potato anywhere I can find a place to tuck in a few more. I found seven volunteer potatoes so far this spring, from the little marbles I missed when I dug up my pathetic crop last year. (Hope they do better this year!)
Yes Martinhouse, it seems we always miss those 'marbles' even though we try to collect everything when harvesting. Fortunately, since we rotate our plantings among about a dozen garden beds each year, the errant potato sprout is usually a dead giveaway among whatever was planted in that bed this year. As for beans, we love to plant various dry beans to shuck in front of the wood stove on those cold Winter evenings. My wife makes some of the best baked beans I've ever had. Saturday night standard... beans, dogs and brown bread!
 

Martinhouse

Veteran Member
I just checked the crisper drawers in my fridge because I bought nice red potatoes last fall to keep in case there were no seed potatoes this spring. One drawer with about 5# in it had nice firm BLACK potatoes. UGH! They go to the trash to be hauled away. The other drawer has about 10# of lovely clean, firm red potatoes with a whole lot of 2" or so sprouts on them. I also have 10# of Red Pontiacs from the feed store from last month, and ten to fifteen pounds of the very small potatoes I harvested from last year's pathetic yield.

Altogether, I have plenty to plant for this year and I'll just hope they do better than last year. And if they don't, I'll just keep all the little ones back for the following year. I do have plenty of both canned and instant potatoes for now, but I intend to make sure that there are always plenty around, including a few to share if someone else need a start for a new garden.
 
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TxGal

Day by day
Below is part 2 of the podcast Adapt 2030 did with Ice Age Farmer. The whole podcast is above, but it's lengthy...for those who may like the short segments, this will help (part 1 is also above):

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UY0DOTLQxco


Preparing for Food Shocks What You Should Consider (Christian Westbrook / David DuByne 2/3)

Run time is 30:31

Changes have sent our planet into a new management system and now we all need to become more self-sufficient as the global elite weaponize food for more control of the populace. We don’t need the power elite any longer we can do it ourselves, solutions for a new world, localized, decentralized and un-taxed. (Christian Westbrook of Ice Age Farmer and David DuByne of ADAPT 2030 Discussion)
 

TxGal

Day by day
Really good podcast from Deep South Homestead for those starting/maintaining gardens, raising any livestock, looking to be more self-sufficient, etc:

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SyMNTEmZNlE


How I Feed My Family for 1 Year -- What Does It Take?

Run time is 22:54

What does it take to feed 2 people for 1 year? Danny and I discuss dinner and supper (lunch and dinner) whatever you want to call them. How much home canned food does it take to feed 2 people for 1 year?
 
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TxGal

Day by day
Here's another podcast from Deep South Homestead that discusses the needs for breakfast for two people for one year. This is a companion podcast to the one above. Very interesting!

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6pZypkmesQo


SHOCKED! ~~ Breakfast for a YEAR! ~~ Reality Check

Run time is 20:02

What does it take to feed 2 people breakfast for 1 year? The numbers are shocking! This was a reality check for us. What would we have to give up if the stores shut down or the food supply goes away? What would we eat and drink?
 

Martinhouse

Veteran Member
I've been watching Deep South Homestead for quite a while now. These videaos are fascinating to watch, especially when they are building things. I've learned so much just watching the various structures go together. And their gardens are fantastic! I don't do any of their other sites of the subscription one, so I'm probably missing a lot, but what I do get is plenty to digest and ponder on.

Today I got my bunny house all hosed out and clean and then I hosed off all the junks that was taken off the shelves in the bunny house. Tomorrow it should all be dry enough to "put back together" and then I onl;y need to clean the cages and patch a corner of the floor of some of them.

The whole while I'm working outdoors on this sort of thing, my thoughts have been churning away trying to decide where I can put more and more containers and pots to grow absolutely as much as I possibly can. Just lately I'm starting to get really worried. I may call the feed store tomorrow morning and see what they might still have that I could use. Like a couple boxes of chicken wire staples, and regular nails, too. Ask if they ever got more rabbit waterers in. A couple more feed scoops and chick waterers.

If my little tiny $tash is going to be worthless soon, I need to spend it while it can get me at least a few useful things.
 

TxGal

Day by day
Adapt 2030 has a new podcast out:

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tPBHcHRc1xs


Ferocious Atmospheric Shift in the Arctic (965)

Run time is 10:34

One of the largest displacements of Arctic air by a warm front ever seen is underway and will bring extremes in atmospheric circulation, electrical discharge and storm activity. Chile unprecedented drought, Yemen massive floods in the same areas Axsum ruled that grew grains in the now desert areas.
 

TxGal

Day by day
Ice Age Farmer has a new podcast out:

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s4CwcUJ1CEU


CO2 Shortage Threatens Food/Water - National Guard Deploys to Meat Plants - Summer Outlook

Run time is 21:23

Summer 2020 is looking rough: no meat, no beer, and maybe even no running water? Christian unpacks an astounding amount of news detailing the issues facing our food (and now water) supply. Start growing your own food today and spread the word.
 

TxGal

Day by day
The Oppenheimer Ranch Project has a new podcast out:

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NdP3ulVjf1w


Storm-Battered South Gets Hit Hard Again with Deadly Severe Weather - Japan Quake and Space Weather

Run time is 19:35

Tornadoes, Storms Rake Across Florida After Killing Three and Damaging Homes in Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia https://bit.ly/3ao7LrU
Storm-battered South gets hit again with deadly severe weather https://bit.ly/2KkNpVF
Tornado damage in Tumbleton, Alabama https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fw1S1...
Tornado touches down south of Houston near West Columbia https://bit.ly/2wXXq8k
Severe storms leave deadly mark on South as tornadoes reported, thousands without power https://fxn.ws/3cAr8zs
Power Outage US https://poweroutage.us/
Severe Thunderstorms Possible In Northeast and South-Central Plains; Fire Weather Concerns In Southern High Plains https://www.weather.gov/
GFS Model https://bit.ly/34P9xRC
Magnitude 6.1 earthquake jolts Miyagi area https://bit.ly/3eEebX6
Realtime Solar Wind https://d3k7gxzd368ul3.cloudfront.net...
ISWA Spiral Model https://go.nasa.gov/2R8QL1h
Kp Index Live https://services.swpc.noaa.gov/images...
Worldwide Volcano News https://www.volcanodiscovery.com/volc...
300,000-year-old throwing stick documents the evolution of hunting https://bit.ly/3bvNC4A
15 Impressive Herbs with Antiviral Activity http://bit.ly/2RZk7iK
Food Supply Anxiety Brings Back Victory Gardens https://nyti.ms/3cArVAq
Victory Garden War Pamphlet https://bit.ly/3eESh68
Celebrate Earth Day under the stars with one of the oldest known meteor showers https://bit.ly/2VnRxuh
 

TxGal

Day by day
I've been watching Deep South Homestead for quite a while now. These videaos are fascinating to watch, especially when they are building things. I've learned so much just watching the various structures go together. And their gardens are fantastic! I don't do any of their other sites of the subscription one, so I'm probably missing a lot, but what I do get is plenty to digest and ponder on.

Today I got my bunny house all hosed out and clean and then I hosed off all the junks that was taken off the shelves in the bunny house. Tomorrow it should all be dry enough to "put back together" and then I onl;y need to clean the cages and patch a corner of the floor of some of them.

The whole while I'm working outdoors on this sort of thing, my thoughts have been churning away trying to decide where I can put more and more containers and pots to grow absolutely as much as I possibly can. Just lately I'm starting to get really worried. I may call the feed store tomorrow morning and see what they might still have that I could use. Like a couple boxes of chicken wire staples, and regular nails, too. Ask if they ever got more rabbit waterers in. A couple more feed scoops and chick waterers.

If my little tiny $tash is going to be worthless soon, I need to spend it while it can get me at least a few useful things.
You're doing really well! We've had decent weather since the storms on Fri/Sat, but more storms are forecasted for tomorrow.

If you can find some empty cattle protein tubs, with a few holes drilled they make great large planters....out this ways you can usually find them free at the trash dump, or sometimes people will try to sell them for $5-$10.

Kotula's is starting to show their galvanized metal raised bed planters again, even though they are back ordered I was able to order several more. I'm waiting for the 8-ft size to be available again (if ever), and one of those would finish out another row for us.

Great idea on the stocking up on miscellaneous things for your place. I've been thinking of extending our chicken run by about 4'x15' and have been trying to find hardware cloth in a 100' roll. About the only supplier I can find is Tractor Supply and it has to be ordered, and it's $155. It's not available at any of the big box hardware stores, smaller feed stores/hardware stores, etc....not just back-ordered, simply not available. I think it all comes from China, so no big surprise. I'm going to re-measure the partial rolls we have and see if I can make it work with what we have on hand instead. Right now, expanding our garden takes priority....I'm just thinking ahead. Fortunately, we have plenty of fence staples, etc., on hand.

For anyone looking to stock-up on needed items like Martinhouse is considering, and me, too - it's likely a good idea as long as it fits your budget. I've never seen hardware cloth in such limited supply. Guessing all those newcomers to raising chickens are buying up normal supplies.
 

Martinhouse

Veteran Member
Decided to check before going to the feed store and found two unopened boxes of chicken wire staples! So I stayed home.

I got all the junk back into the bunny house but it was too hard to lift it up onto the high shelf. Since I don't intend to have my tall handyman doing any more chores for me, I'll have to get my tall step stool out there. It has wide enough steps that I won't lose my footing if I have to use both hands to lift the items up onto the shelf. If I'm lucky, there might be a break in the rain so I can do it tomorrow. Today I did get a lot more things hosed clean, things I'd had lying around all winter. Feels nice to get more mess cleaned up. Tomorrow I also hope to skim a couple of pails of dirt from the chicken pen to add to the two extra large pots that I'm going to put my two six-packs of romaine lettuce in. Maybe there will be a second break in the rain.

I love working outside. Even if I have to sit down to do most of it, it's still feels wonderful!
 

PanBear

Veteran Member
(fair use)
Parts of North America Are Currently Heading For a Megadrought, Study Finds
David Nield 20 April 2020


(Brad Helmink/Unsplash)

Even though air pollution levels have been dropping in the wake of the coronavirus outbreak, the climate crisis isn't going to go away. In fact, parts of the US and Mexico could be in line for a "megadrought" in the very near future, scientists warn.

Based on an analysis of precipitation levels since the turn of the century, and how they match up with soil moisture levels recorded by tree rings over the last 1,200 years, future modelling suggests the southwestern North American (SWNA) region could see a drought that's worse than any in recorded history.

The conditions we've seen in the SWNA region since 2000 match up with times of severe drought in the past, the researchers say. It's possible that a megadrought has already started, though 2019 precipitation levels did offer some respite.


The area covered by the study. (Adapted from Williams et al., Science, 2020)

"Earlier studies were largely model projections of the future," says bioclimatologist Park Williams, from Columbia University. "We're no longer looking at projections, but at where we are now."

"We now have enough observations of current drought and tree-ring records of past drought to say that we're on the same trajectory as the worst prehistoric droughts."
Reliable weather records only go back to around 1900, but the researchers studied the ring patterns in thousands of trees to calculate soil moisture levels – and therefore rainfall – right back to 800 CE.

They identified four megadroughts that were particularly severe, and the 19 years from 2000-2018 is outdoing three of those droughts in terms of lack of moisture, and is closely tied with the fourth (1575 to 1603).

The analysis also showed that this current drought is affecting wider areas, and affecting them more consistently, which the team attributes to climate change.

While the current drought may have happened anyway, the researchers estimate global warming is responsible for half of the drought's pace and half of its severity, producing hotter air that can hold more moisture pulled out of the ground.

"It doesn't matter if this is exactly the worst drought ever," says environmental scientist Benjamin Cook, from Columbia University. "What matters is that it has been made much worse than it would have been because of climate change."

The earlier droughts were brought on by natural factors such as cooling ocean temperatures that blocked storms from reaching the west coast of the US. Add those factors to human-caused temperature rises of about 1.2 degrees Celsius (2.2 degrees Fahrenheit) and it's a scary picture.

That temperature rise could cancel out the natural variability in precipitation seen in past centuries, making droughts longer, drier, and more widespread. The signs of this shift are appearing everywhere, not just in North America.

The study also showed that the 20th century was the wettest of all from the 1,200-year period covered – which may have lulled us into a false sense of security about how hard we would need to work to protect water supplies.

"The 20th century gave us an overly optimistic view of how much water is potentially available," says Cook. "It goes to show that studies like this are not just about ancient history. They're about problems that are already here."

The research has been published in Science.
Parts of North America Are Currently Heading For a Megadrought, Study Finds
 

TxGal

Day by day
Thanks, Martinhouse....been working outside all evening trying to catch up.

Here's the Ice Age Farmer podcast Martinhouse mentioned:

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gqKoBo86Jgg


Social Media Censors as Food Shortages Begin

Run time is 11:40

As the food supply chain goes critical and meat shortages begin, Twitter is now censoring "conspiracy theory" about food shortages. This underscores the reality and the urgency of this situation -- start growing now. Help farmers/ranchers. Do not let the technocrats control our food supply.
 

TxGal

Day by day

Volcanic activity escalating in part of Iceland that has not erupted for 800 years

April 23, 2020 by Robert

Scientists warn it could cause disruption for centuries to come.

Since 21 January, the Reykjanes peninsula south-west of Iceland’s capital, Reykjavik, has experienced more than 8,000 earthquakes and about 10cm of land uplift due to magma intrusions underground.

“It seems that after being relatively inactive for many centuries, this region is waking up,” said volcanologist Dave McGarvie.

Reykjanes peninsula’s last active period started in the 10th century and lasted until the 13th. Situated only nine miles (15km) from Iceland’s international airport, when activity in this region gets going it appears to splutter on and off for up to 300 years, producing eruptive episodes (locally known as “fires”) lasting a few decades. Long thin cracks (fissures) extend up to five miles (8km), producing fountains of lava, usually without large amounts of ash or explosive activity.

The most recent “fires” occurred between 1210 and 1240 and covered about 50 sq km of land in lava.

“People on the Reykjanes peninsula, and their descendants for several generations, may have to be on their guard and ready to evacuate every so often,” said McGarvie.

Awakening volcanic region in Iceland 'could cause disruption for centuries'
 

Martinhouse

Veteran Member
I wanted to work outside today, too, but it was just too windy and chilly for me. Hoping it will be better tomorrow. If I can, I hope to get all six rabbit cages wire-brushed clean and maybe even get the worst ones patched. And hopefully get all the hosed-off gear from the other day lifted up onto the overhead storage shelf. Then I'll be ready enough for getting rabbits, should I still be so lucky.

The sun came out this afternoon and heated my greenhouse up enough for me to open the door into the living room to let some of that heat into the house and so I turned off my space heater. It's the end of April and I should be able to start whittling down the electric bill somewhat from now on.
 

Martinhouse

Veteran Member
Wow!. Ice Age Farmer is really piling up the posts on his Twitter page! It's like he's trying to get out as much as possible while they still let him do it. If this is the case, I expect it will all get taken down soon.

Listening to him and reading his posts, as well, sure does make it hard to sit around and be lazy! Right now I"m so anxious for tomorrow to come so I can get outside and get lots more done on all the chores that should have been done by now.

Not sure I'll even be ble to fall asleep tonight, my brain will be spinning so fast!
 

TxGal

Day by day
Also a new short Adapt 2030 just out.

The Phase Out of Humanity

Runs 11:40
Thanks, Martinhouse - I need your opinion. I watched a chunk of this one, and it seems most is not GSM-related...do you think I should post it? I kind of struggle with trying to post the GSM info and food shortage podcasts mostly, although there are other subjects that circle around those two that are more virus or political. I'm not quite sure what to do with this one - help!
 

TxGal

Day by day
Wow!. Ice Age Farmer is really piling up the posts on his Twitter page! It's like he's trying to get out as much as possible while they still let him do it. If this is the case, I expect it will all get taken down soon.

Listening to him and reading his posts, as well, sure does make it hard to sit around and be lazy! Right now I"m so anxious for tomorrow to come so I can get outside and get lots more done on all the chores that should have been done by now.

Not sure I'll even be ble to fall asleep tonight, my brain will be spinning so fast!
I'm going to try to pull some of those tweets over here, they are unnerving!
 

Martinhouse

Veteran Member
TxGal, I guess I think all these food shortage videos belong here because they tie in with the food shortages that have already been showing up for the last two or three growing seasons from the changing weather. Seems to me that the difficult, unreliable weather, the food shortages, pandemic, and eventually even famine, are all fast becoming tightly interrelated components of one big picture, the GSM.

I know I sure tie them all together when making my plans for the near future and further out as well.
 

TxGal

Day by day
TxGal, I guess I think all these food shortage videos belong here because they tie in with the food shortages that have already been showing up for the last two or three growing seasons from the changing weather. Seems to me that the difficult, unreliable weather, the food shortages, pandemic, and eventually even famine, are all fast becoming tightly interrelated components of one big picture, the GSM.

I know I sure tie them all together when making my plans for the near future and further out as well.
Excellent guidance, thank you! I'll post it below :-)
 

TxGal

Day by day
Here's the latest Adapt 2030 podcast Martinhouse mentioned:

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SvOPd7_SdDs


The Phase Out of Humanity (967)

Run time is 11:40

With Earth Day the signal to a move away from renewables is set in motion, humans are the problem and need to be phased out after being relegated to menial tasks and medieval surfs on Universal Basic Income as the wildlife renews itself returning where human apes once roamed. There will be no return to normal, you are being phased out.
 

TxGal

Day by day
Geeze Louise, I followed one of the twitter links on Ice Age Farmer's twitter feed, and spotted the one below. I can't see how the country will avoid facing meat shortages very, very soon with the way this is being (not) handled. We raise our own beef and have plenty in the freezer(s) but actually eat more chicken and turkey. I really don't want to raise poultry for the freezer, but we'll have to see how this plays out. We may be heading that way:

View: https://twitter.com/CharConner/status/1253300094977351681
 

Martinhouse

Veteran Member
Back when I first started keeping chickens, the old guy across the road from me gave me a bunch of the culled chicks from his poultry houses. They were the chicks that had a black feather here and there that other chicks would peck at until there would be blood. They couldn't let this behavior develop so they got rid of any chicks with black dots anywhere on them.

These chicks weren't anything like regular egg-laying backyard chickens, They were voracious all the time and got HUGE. My daughter had to put her jeans on to hang laundry because those chickens would peck at the little moles on her legs if she went outside bare-legged.

I think some of the poultry houses are still in use and I sure wish I knew the people who ran them now. I haven't driven anywhere lately so I can't say if there are even chicks growing there at this time. I rather suspect there are not. In my area, all of the poultry houses are contracted by Tyson, but a lot of them have been torn down in recent years.

If I were younger and healthy, I'd hunt up one that was operating and offer to buy a few culls from them. Be nice to can up fifteen or twenty birds and maybe interesting to crossbreed some of the hens with my Barred Rock rooster and then incubate the eggs.
 
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Seeker22

Veteran Member
Ice Age Farmer is causing me to lose sleep.
Good. Go can something, plant something, mend something, learn a skill and practice it. Give thanks for something. Breathe. This is the long march, not a sprint.

What are the key issues keeping you up at night? Try to find ways around them with your preps and skills. And when you just hit that wall of helpless where you can't do anymore. Give it up and give it to God. He sees your striving and your tears. He Knows. I get to sleep sometimes by calling up happier times and thanking in hushed whispers for each sweet memory. Work will wait for the morrow. Sleep is the Great Medicine.
 

flame

Contributing Member
I hope to be planting this coming week...and did manage to get some more prepping done. Prepping for six has taken me a long time, hope I don't make any big mistakes..seems every time I get caught up, I realize something else that needs done..you're right Seeker22...sometimes al! you got left is prayer and hope.
 

Seeker22

Veteran Member
I hope to be planting this coming week...and did manage to get some more prepping done. Prepping for six has taken me a long time, hope I don't make any big mistakes..seems every time I get caught up, I realize something else that needs done..you're right Seeker22...sometimes al! you got left is prayer and hope.
If all you have left is prayer and hope, you are well armed. The real Battle will be fought in the Spiritual. We just have to sweat down here a little to get it done. TB2K is where you come to iron out any prepping mistakes. This place is Alexandria on a computer chip.
 

TxGal

Day by day

TxGal

Day by day
Adapt 2030 has a new podcast out:

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wTfTQ2SO4yA


Foods Disappearing One By One (669)

Run time is 11:20

As global grain, vegetable, fruit and nut yields continue to decline, we will be retrained to eat blemished fruit and taught not to hunt feral pigs because that's only what the authorities can do. A discouragement fro self sufficiency and only rely on supermarkets which will be less and less stocked, meaning prices up and declining alternatives for consumers. Big-Ag lobbying to keep food only through their supply chains.
 
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