Contagion Preps for coronavirus

COelf

Contributing Member
I wish I had this posted earlier. I have had brain fog for a few days and tonight I blacked out for a bit. Now I am clearer.
The blood/brain barrier can be broken by viruses and watching the videos of people falling down should have alerted me to this before. It takes 6-7 days for the virus to infect the brain. Here are some links that have information on this without too much technical mumbo jumbo. Blood-Brain Barrier Damage (Oct 2014) Townsend Letter, Alternative Medicine Magazine Study explores blood-brain barrier leakage in CNS infections
Foods to steer clear of if the brain is involved: refined carbohydrates and refined vegetable oils.
Good fats: lard, tallow, schmaltz, duck fat, eggs yolks, olives, avocados.
Carbs: fruits and vegetables
Leave the baked goods for a time when you are well.
I hope everyone is right about this being a nothing. If it is a nothing then it will be because of the immediate response to the travelers who are ill. I hope we are all wrong about this.
 

SouthernBreeze

Has No Life - Lives on TB
This is the way I'm looking at it. If this virus turns out to be nothing, we will be ahead of the curve if/when another "something" comes along. I see nothing that we're doing as being an over reaction, just being safer rather than sorry. It's caused me to take a much needed inventory of all my medical supplies, and showed me things that I was lacking. Latex gloves and masks being the main two.

Yesterday, we had a light switch go bad in our bedroom. Cary is going to be making a run into town today to get a replacement. While in town, he will be picking up more N95 masks, gloves, and powdered Gatorade.
 

Kayak

Adrenaline Junkie
This stuff was in country, ordered last week, and is on it 's way. I suspect I'll make very sure whoever handles bringing it in washes well and uses sanitizer, and the envelope will be fed to the wood stove (kinda sad, since the exotic address makes for a fun geography lesson). The stickers will be sealed in a baggie, I suspect. Maybe pitch the bag for a fresh one and go from there?
Take a picture of the address and sticker and stamp for your lessons.

Put the stuff you bought in the sun to disinfect. Make sure all sides get a few hours of direct sunlight.

I'm considering buying one of those UV lights so we can disinfect the mail and packages without getting them wet. Sunlight works too, but takes longer.
 

summerthyme

Administrator
_______________
Coronavirus and OTC cough meds

Saw a pharmacist and requested the strongest OTC expectorant they had and he suggested Robitussin DM. I ask what it would do for palliative care for the coronavirus. He said: "Noth...(there was a pregnant pause here that gave birth to another)...ing.". I could almost see his brain switch gears. He told me it wasn't strong enough. Nothing OTC was. He said: at that point I should talk to my doctor for something stronger.

I picked up the DM anyway. YMMV.
If you want a pure expectorant, buy Mucinex. Most of the combination products (like Tussin DM) have both an expectorant and a cough suppressant, which seems awfully counterproductive!

What we do is take Mucinex (guaifenisen- it helps liquid and thin the mucous so you can eliminate it by coughing) during the day. Then, if coughing is interfering with sleep, we take something with dexamethorpan to suppress the cough enough to allow rest.

Summerthyme
 

nomifyle

Has No Life - Lives on TB
If you want a pure expectorant, buy Mucinex. Most of the combination products (like Tussin DM) have both an expectorant and a cough suppressant, which seems awfully counterproductive!

What we do is take Mucinex (guaifenisen- it helps liquid and thin the mucous so you can eliminate it by coughing) during the day. Then, if coughing is interfering with sleep, we take something with dexamethorpan to suppress the cough enough to allow rest.

Summerthyme
A couple of years ago I had bronchitis and the VA ER gave me Guaifenesin and Bensonatate and I've been keeping it on hand ever since, the bensonatate stops a cough in its tracks, its a small clear capsule.

Judy
 

Old Gray Mare

Has No Life - Lives on TB
B.R.A.T. Diet: Banana, Rice, Applesauce and Toast. A meal I've used for the kids when they've had delicate tummies.

While out shopping I was able to pick up applesauce and the greenest bananas I could find. They'll ripen and then what? Not sure how it will work out but picked up some containers of banana baby food.

Also picked up flavored Jello. I plan to use it to flavor rehydration fluid and as a restorative. One of its main ingredients is gelatin, thinking candy flavored bone broth for the kids (especially the big ones).

Also picked up some curcumin ainitfunny seems to set store by.
 
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plantman

Veteran Member
I recall when the SARS epidemic was a concern that a nurse recommended keeping the patient "on the dry side". I took that to mean don't push the fluids. Maybe because of the potential for fluid perfusion to the lungs. Anyone have any thoughts on that?
Didn't see a response. I'm also not a doctor. I watched a video about the Spanish flu and it was said that the immune response caused the body to flood the lungs with fluids in an effort to eradicate the virus. My unprofessional guess is that keeping a patient on the dry side may help lessen that fluid.
 

ktrapper

Veteran Member
We are making Lomatium Root tincture using dried root and Organic, with the mother, ACV.

It supposed to be ready in three weeks but we will start consuming it sooner.
 

JenJen

Member
I just realized, doing same thing last few days as doing 20+ years ago. Back then y2k. This time, two houses. Checking supplies, washing blankets, sheets, towels, vacuum. In Oklahoma, on a well and generator on its own box and plugged into house. Mom insisted, remembered a time when no electricity for 6 weeks. Not to go woo, but what if workers can't get to downed powerlines during bad weather or propane not delivered because their sick? Winter is not over and I hate to use wash tub and rub board and wringeout towels and jeans by hand. Clean while you can and set down rules for family. Home near Ft Worth is next.
 

Lomatium Root: Possibly the Best Anti-Viral
By: Adam Stark


  • Much appreciative of the information on Lomatium....planning to get some and share this news! MaJo






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lomatium dissectum leaves and flowers
Lomatium Root (Lomatium dissectum, formerly Leptotaenia dissecta syn. multfida)OTHER NAMES: Fernleaf Biscuitroot, Desert Parsley, Indian Parsnip, Toza Root
Lomatium may very well be the best antiviral we have. It’s certainly the best and strongest I’ve ever used both topically and internally, and especially for the lungs. So why haven’t you heard of it?
Lomatium was highly regarded by the Native American peoples of the high plateaus of the Pacific Northwest, who used it as a primary herb for all sorts of infections and lung ailments. Unfortunately, by the time that white settlers were making inroads in the region, medical science had already “advanced” past the stage where they believed there was anything left to learn from native peoples about native plants. Sure, frontier medicine might do in a pinch. But modern, official, civilized medicine (i.e. purgative, cathartics, and electroshock) was to be preferred.
We’re still feeling the repercussions of this bias. Look at the shelves of your local natural product store: almost every major American drug plant in commerce is either an East Coast native (Goldenseal, Cranberry, Willow, Slippery Elm), developed by European scientists (Echinacea, Black Cohosh, Saw Palmetto), or recreational (Coffee, Tobacco, Marijuana). Only now are we really beginning to look at our vast Western pharmacopeia.
In retrospect, we could have looked a lot sooner. And it’s not like we didn’t have clues. Back in 1920, a young physician named Ernst Krebs published an account of his experience with Lomatium in the Bulletin of the Nevada State Board of Health. Krebs had been assigned by the Indian Bureau to the Washoe reservation, and he was there when the Spanish flu hit. (The so-called Spanish flu was an avian strain that killed more than 500,000 Americans, and between 20 and 100 million worldwide):
“…Whether a coincidence or not, there was not a single death in the Washoe tribe from influenza or its complications, although Indians living in other parts of the State where the root did not grow died in numbers. It was such a remarkable coincidence that a practicing physician who saw apparently hopeless cases recover without any other medication or care of any kind investigated the root. A preparation was prepared and employed in a great many cases among the whites, from the mildest to the most virulent types of influenza, and it proved, among other things, that it is the nearest approach we have today to a specific in epidemic influenza and the accompanying pneumonia… Other physicians were induced to give it a trial, with the same results. It is beyond the experimental stage, as its therapeutic action in this direction is established and beyond any doubt. The cases in which it has been used run into the hundreds. There is probably no therapeutic agent so valuable in the treatment of influenzal pneumonia.”
Too good to be true? Well, we have no reason to doubt him. (Contrary to popular belief, this is not the Ernst T. Krebs Jr. who would later get all quack-y claiming he could cure cancer with “vitamin B17.”) But his account was published, and then, seemingly, ignored.
The next we hear of Lomatium is from a researcher named Percy Train who was sent to Nevada by the U.S. government to screen local plants for potential drug development. He spent six years there, starting in the mid 1930s, and found nothing that even touched Lomatium for sheer germ-killing firepower. In the words of the late, great herbalist Michael Moore, “It killed just about every microbe his research group tested it against, and you could douse rats in it without hurting them.”
Train published his book in 1941. Once again, published, then ignored.
Fast forward to today. Lomatium is still virtually unknown, and there still isn’t a shred of formal research on it. There isn’t a marketing push. Nobody has ever gotten on the Oprah Show to tout it.
But the plant has had two strong advocates: the great naturopathic doctor, John Bastyr; and the great herbalist, Michael Moore. It’s because of these two men, I believe, that the knowledge of Lomatium is still alive today. Most everyone who uses Lomatium now can trace their knowledge back to either Moore or Bastyr, either directly, or indirectly, through one of their thousands of students.
And now, finally, the word is just beginning to get out, as fears about modern-day H1N1 have begun prompting people to look for solutions.
Bird flu, swine flu, three-toed sloth flu I don’t care. Lomatium shines in viral infections, period. I’ve been using it for over a decade, and I’ve never met a viral infection where it hasn’t at least made a dent. Even in infections where I didn’t expect it to work for example a friend with Hep C, who took Lomatium on the advice of a naturopathic doctor, and saw her viral load plummet it’s worked. In Chronic Fatigue with a (presumed) viral component, it’s worked. In shingles, it’s worked. Michael Moore suggests using it for what he calls the “slow viruses”: HPV, Mono, Hep C, CMV, and (he suggests tentatively) HIV.
But Lomatium seems to specialize in viruses of the respiratory tract. Many of the plant’s antiviral compounds are excreted out through the mucosa of the lungs. So on their way out the body, they end up exactly where they’re needed. First, they thin congested, boggy mucous and work as a mild expectorant. But again, we come back to where Lomatium shines: as a stone cold germ-killer. For deep lung infections, I have found nothing that can match our modest little Biscuitroot. And if you’re one of those people whose every little sniffle or sneeze ends up sinking its claws into your chest, Lomatium is invaluable at the first sign. It can still be effective after an infection has already established itself.
Lomatium is also useful topically. For example, if you’re dealing with a wart, try soaking the pad of a band-aid in the standard tincture of Lomatium, and apply it over the area before going to bed. You ought to see shrinkage in 4-5 days.
Suppositories made with Lomatium, Western Red Cedar, and vitamin A are a standard naturopathic protocol in viral infections of the cervix, although I have no direct experience here.
SAFETY: Lomatium may cause a skin rash in as many as 1% of the people who take it. I’ve given Lomatium or Lomatium-containing products to close to 1,000 people, and I’ve heard of the rash four times. One was a woman who got it on her arms after taking Lomatium for a few days. She stopped taking the herb, and the rash went away a few days later. Another woman got a very mild rash on her neck, and continued taking the Lomatium because it was working so well. She just wore a turtleneck. The third woman got a head-to-toe rash and checked into the ER for some strong suppressive anti-inflammatories. Finally, I just heard this week of someone who took my Lomatium-containing cold’n’flu formula who saw a mild rash develop a few days in. The rash went away in a few days by itself.
There’s some debate in the medical herbalism community as to what causes the rash, and how to avoid it. Some say it depends on how the medicine is prepared. Lomatium is very rich in resins, they say, and there’s foam that should be skimmed from the top when you’re preparing it. Others cite Michael Moore’s take on the subject, which is that it’s not the herb itself, but a detox reaction to metabolic products of viral or bacterial die-off. He says that in 30 years, he’s never seen the rash in people who take Lomatium along with herbs that support detox. I’m not sure who I agree with. But, die-off or not, coincidence or not, I’ll say that I’ve only once seen the rash in people taking a good, Lomatium-based formula, with good supportive herbs.
DOSING: I dose Lomatium high, because I use it acutely. 60-90 drops of the tincture, 3-4 times a day.
 

Tesss

Senior Member
I just ordered more N95 masks on Amazon. Thanks for the heads up on the other thread, they are running out fast. Needless to say, prices appear to be up, also.

Next is the usual check the preps, get ahead on food & household items, double check meds/colds and flu supplies, get livestock feed a bit ahead, keep cars up on gasoline. We'll definitely make a concerted effort to shop off hours when needed, but ideally not need to shop much. We're in between two major college towns...needless to say we're cautious.
3M has different masks that are N-95 in Lowe’s and Home Depot. 3M has a “disclaimer “ for their masks and respirators and masks. I need recommendations. Mask or respirator? Disposable mask or is their masks that are reusable? Do you need cartridges for reparators? 3M say check their site for recommendations for proper use. I can’t find it. CDC seems to just want us to wash or hands, cover your cough and wear just any old yard mask!
 

psychgirl

Veteran Member
I just checked Swanson’s.
They have a 17oz for a great price!

There are tons of other brands in smaller , varying sizes too but I’m not sure if one brand is better than the others or not. Would all syrup pretty much be the same?

Also, I had a thought. Could I make my own oregano oil of I steep an entire bottle of the dried herb in coconut oil for a couple of days?
 

summerthyme

Administrator
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I just checked Swanson’s.
They have a 17oz for a great price!

There are tons of other brands in smaller , varying sizes too but I’m not sure if one brand is better than the others or not. Would all syrup pretty much be the same?

Also, I had a thought. Could I make my own oregano oil of I steep an entire bottle of the dried herb in coconut oil for a couple of days?
First, there is no way to know what's in a particular bottle of elderberry syrup. I've seen way too many substandard herbal products over the years to trust most of them. At the least, read the label... Mine would read, "organic elderberry juice, organic honey, alcohol 5% by volume".

It may be the commercial products are the same... but I'd want to be sure they aren't using white sugar or even high fructose corn syrup before I bought it.

There was a brand called "Dave's Honey Gardens" which was very basic and produced in Vermont, IIRC. I think they've been bought out, so I don't know if the quality is the same.

And no, you can't make an essential oil by soaking an herb in a base oil... that is an herbal infused oil, and while it may well be effective for many uses, it's not a replacement for an essential oil, which is produced by steam distilling the herb

Summerthyme
 

psychgirl

Veteran Member
Well darn. Ok.
Thank you Summerthyme! I’ll keep looking around for the syrup. On a vet techs pay, I can’t afford a whole lot.
And I figured as much about the oregano.... it was just an idea I had.
 
Taken from past posts on TB, probably good idea to repost now:


Oral Rehydration Solution

One quart clean water
6 teaspoons or 2 tablespoons sugar
Half teaspoon each normal salt and potassium chloride “salt substitute”
or
Teaspoon “lite salt” it’s half/half sodium and potassium chlorides
Half teaspoon baking soda
For flavor, add-sugar type Kool-Aid at half strength
That was originally mine. I tried the kool-aid, wasn’t happy, jello might be better. Remember, the sugar is an essential ingredient, don’t use a substitute.
 

Old Gray Mare

Has No Life - Lives on TB
I'm a little frustrated. DH thinks the reason China's hospitals are having problems is because it's socialized medical system. He can't conceive of a modern medical system overwhelmed by the demands of large numbers of sick patients. We went out to a park today. Everything was just so incredibly normal.
 
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Bensam

Senior Member
As one who has worked in multiple hospitals, it is entirely likely that the medical establishment would be overwhelmed very easily. Most hospitals lack the depth in personnel that they did many years ago. There is a nation wide shortage of nurses. If this turns into (and it probably will) a nation wide epidemic, there will be shortages of essential supplies. Internet supplies of N95 masks sold out in approximately 9 hours overnight. This is a very serious situation.
 
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Hfcomms

EN66iq
dont forget rubber gloves,, was looking thru my stuff and found several boxes of them
Bumping for emphasis. You can get all the nitrile gloves you want off of Amazon right now and they are not that expensive. Just bought another box of 200 for $15. If this gets going your going to use a lot of them and once the public at large becomes aware of the threat growing more imminent sometime next week items such as this will be unavailable. Lot easier to have disposable gloves as opposed to constantly trying to sterilize a set of rubber gloves you might have.
 

school marm

Contributing Member
Also, I had a thought. Could I make my own oregano oil of I steep an entire bottle of the dried herb in coconut oil for a couple of days?
Here's an article discussing the differences between and uses of oregano oil, oil of oregano, oregano essential oil, and the stuff you grow in the garden.


I tried to make it a hyperlink. I've done it before, but for some reason I'm not figuring it out today.
 

Old Gray Mare

Has No Life - Lives on TB
Suggestion: Long ago I was told to test a masks "fit" by putting it on, adjusting it and then cutting an onion. If I could smell the onion thru the mask it wasn't fitted correctly and to readjust.

The woman who told me this passed and her life might have been saved if she'd worn a mask.
 

Freeholder

This too shall pass.
On vitamin D, first, the reason why I so strongly recommend it. For my entire adult life, I got the flu really bad every winter, sometimes more than once. The last twenty years or so before we started on D, I was coming close to pneumonia and a stay in the hospital, and would be knocked down for six weeks or more each time. About ten or twelve years ago, youngest daughter and I started taking vitamin D and I have skipped getting the flu ever since, or just got such a mild case that I barely knew I was sick.

Daughter gets her D levels checked fairly regularly because she does take a high dose - depending on type and time of year, between 2,000 and 10,000 IU per day, or one big dose of 50,000 IU per week. I take the same dose but don’t get my levels checked (she has lupus and vitiligo and cannot be in the sun for more than five minutes). Her levels have never been excessively high, and are usually in the low end of what is considered to be the normal range (I suspect that the so-called normal range may actually be lower than the optimal range).

The best types of D seem to be either liquid or gel caps, not tablets. And you can do the one big dose per week because of it being an oil-soluble vitamin. It doesn’t wash right back out of your body, but is stored and used as needed.

Kathleen
 

marsh

TB Fanatic
Me too :). Good natured teasing and ribbing because I told them all to go out now and get masks while they still are available locally - just a few weeks after I called them all and told them to go out and fill their gas tanks when Sulemani was killed. I'm now chicken little and the butt of jokes. I held my tongue for years because I didn't want to use up my 'warning' card if I did it too often. Not my fault we had two events that called for situational awareness in one month's time. My doctor family members are telling me it's nothing, the flu is worse. I had to give them a quick reality check. But like you, I pray they're right and that I have confirmation bias from living on TB this week discussing this.

HD
I told both my children about it and to get certain supplies. One already has the regular flu and has a history of lung issues that required major surgery and the other sent me back cutsie memes of children in plastic bubbles and people in space suits escaping the planet. They both remember Y2K.

I have gotten minimum supplies in house for when the later one and grandkids need them because it looks like they both "ok Boomer"ed me. They have to take some responsibility. My resources are few.
 

bev

Has No Life - Lives on TB
I strongly disagree. I'm not really seeing indications of cytokine storm *so far* in the reporting, and one hint that it isn't a major feature is the fact that fatalities so far have been mostly elderly or people with co-morbidities. Cytokine storm is generally a problem for the young and healthy... the reason so many young adults in the prime of their lives died in the 1918 flu epidemic.

Taken *early*, it should prevent the virus from reproducing, which is the key to keeping the viral load low... which is one of the main keys to preventing a cytokine storm.

Here are some links to an effective disinfectant, at a very good price. Sorry, I don't want to retype the whole thing again..

Summerthyme
Summer, I also read early on that those dying from this new coronavirus were elderly and/or those with other health issues.

BUT the most recent reports I saw were that the majority of deaths were 40-60 years old.

Not sure if that would change your thoughts about the cytokines issues.

Sorry, but I don’t have any idea of where I saw this - it was in the long thread somewhere. I’m sure we’ll see the figures again.
 

jed turtle

a brother in the Lord
seems like we should hear opposing views...
lots of good advice anyways...
LewRockwell.comanti-state•anti-war•pro-market

Your Chance Of Developing Symptoms Or Dying From The Menacing Coronavirus That Now Threatens Global Human Populations Is 0.0000017482% Symptoms/ 0.0000001137% Death
By Bill Sardi
January 25, 2020
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My email box fills with questions: what about the coronavirus epidemic? Is death on its way from Asia to the West? There is no vaccine for this viral scourge. Will our infants who have no antibodies against this virus die? Will vulnerable and frail senior adults be whisked off in ambulances to hospital intensive care units, never to return home as they drown from fluid in their lungs (pneumonia)?

But coronavirus it is just a common cold virus.
Yep, the coronavirus is just a common virus that infects your nose, sinuses and upper throat and produces the same symptoms as a cold. But the fear that is being spread by public health authorities and the news media would make one think the earth is in the middle of a historic human pandemic.
The Coronavirus that is menacing human populations around the globe right now is an RNA virus that is “enveloped” so it resists eradication by one’s own immune system. In a very few subjects who are immune compromised, such as patients taking drugs for autoimmune disorders (Cyclosporine, Prednisone, Methotrexate, Imuran), or youngsters who have undeveloped immunity, or others who are old and have weak immune systems due malnutrition, they may develop pneumonia (drown in their own pus and fluid in their lungs) and be hospitalized, placed on a respirator, or die.

Just in case you are worried, out of a population of 7+ billion people on Earth, your chance of developing symptoms from this corona-shaped cold virus is ~1 in millions and for death ~1 in hundreds of millions. However, risk dramatically increases with advancing age and among malnourished populations such as in Asia where deficiencies of essential nutrients, namely zinc and vitamins C and D, are often prevalent. Modern medicine casts a blind eye at nutrition.
But regardless of what you have just read here that minimalizes the risk, health officials are beating the Coronavirus drum, with mass contagion predicted and an expert predicting this outbreak could be ten times worse than the 2003 epidemic that left 813 dead. That may only be true in a country with a large portion of malnourished people like China. The estimate that the Coronavirus will grow to 10,000 cases in the Chinese city of Wuhan (11 million population) is still a very low risk — 1/100th of one-percent.

Public health officials are pulling off another of their ruses, wearing hazmat suits, quarantining whole cities, swabbing throats of airplane passengers who land in foreign countries after visiting the Coronavirus epicenter, Wuhan, China. Public fear is created. At this point, no one knows whether the death rate is higher than past cold and flu seasons.

Treatment but not a cure
And just so you know, there is no proven treatment or vaccine to prevent or abolish coronavirus infections. Standard treatment to allay symptoms is comprised of steroids to reduce inflammation, judicious use of antibiotics and (largely ineffective) antiviral drugs like interferon or ribavirin. Steroids reduce inflammation but deplete vitamin C. This makes it difficult to wean off cortisone.
Self-treated patients may opt for over-the-counter medicines that contain vitamin C-depleting medications such as aspirin and acetaminophen/Tylenol (a prominent ingredient in Nyquil) that depletes glutathione, a major internal antioxidant produced by vitamin C. Smokers further deplete vitamin C. Individuals on diuretics (water pills) for high blood pressure wash out their vitamin C faster. Unwittingly, under these circumstances, viral infection could get worse, not better.
Based upon symptoms, public health authorities tend to overestimate the percentage of ill patients that actually have laboratory-confirmed coronavirus. In one study, among 1460 cases of unexplained respiratory illnesses reported to the Centers For Disease Control, only 2% were laboratory confirmed coronavirus.

In the often-cited 2003 SARS coronavirus epidemic, most cases in the U.S. were attributed to air travel to the U.S. from Asia and “there was no evidence of community transmission.” Even in Hong Kong, in the 2003-2004 SARS coronavirus outbreak, only 3.4% of patients died and all were over age 65. So, age is the mortal factor, not infection itself.
The Biotech industry prays for these infectious disease outbreaks to free-up public funds to develop drugs and vaccines. Otherwise the drug/vaccine makers have to bear the research and development burden on their own.

Useless health advice
All the advice to stay away from crowds, wear a mask, wash your hands, is silly. That is because the lack of hygiene is not why cold and flu viruses plague the planet in winter months. It is just that winter months are when the human immune system crashes. The disease is lack of internal defense, not external exposure and transmission. The primary reason for this is plunging vitamin D levels from lack of sunlight as the earth tilts away from the sun in the winter solstice.
Sunshine vitamin D activates rapid responding class of white blood cells called neutrophils that literally blow up viral-infected cells.

Pray to God the virus doesn’t mutate?
While fearmongers warn the coronavirus may mutate and spread faster, and news agencies lament the stock market is crashing while spreading fear to attract readers and viewers. The 2019 coronavirus IS a new mutation. But some mutations actually reduce its virulence. The irresponsibility of news reports not to inform the public that any fast-mutating coronavirus would be self-limiting and rapidly “peter out” into a less virulent form.

Inflammation and coronavirus control
During coronavirus infection, inflammation, particularly in the lungs, is activated by a protein complex called NF-kappa B.
Coronaviruses activate NF-kappa-B which is the key signaling molecule that provokes the inflammation that ends up filling the lungs with fluid. Any agent that targets and inhibits NF-kappa-B is a candidate for quelling coronaviruses.

While it is said there are no proven cures to battle coronavirus, and pharmaceutical companies attempt to develop patentable NF-kappa-B inhibitors, there are 785 natural NF-kappa-B inhibitors that have already been identified that include vitamins D, C & E, alpha lipoic acid, NAC (sulfur), resveratrol, quercetin, zinc, garlic (allicin), among many others, all commercially available at health shops.

Innate immunity: vitamin D
There are two immune responses in humans: the rapid innate immunity and latent adaptive immunity. The innate immune response is considered the “key regulator in the virulence of coronavirus infections.”
The earliest arriving white blood cells at the site of infection are neutrophils and are part of the innate immune system. Neutrophils comprise ~60% of the white blood cells in circulation.
Vitamin D is the governor of innate immunity. The protective benefits of vitamin D are said to “lie in its ability to stimulate innate immunity and reduce inflammation.”
Vitamin D suppresses NF-kappa B signaling, dampens excessive inflammation while enhancing killing of viruses by neutrophils
Senior adults have been found to have 2.6 times greater risk for pneumonia between highest and lowest blood levels of vitamin D.

How much vitamin D?
Particularly in winter months, or among people who don’t get much sunshine that produces natural vitamin D, children and adults need far more vitamin D than is recommended. Due to a miscalculation, the need for supplemental vitamin D is underestimated;
adults need ~8000 units/day; infants 1000 units; children over age 1 year, 3000 units/day.
The Daily Value published on the back of bottles of vitamin D is 400-800 units, which doesn’t even raise blood levels. This locks in a certain amount of otherwise preventable disease in the population at large. This is akin to allowing some pyromaniac to start fires just to show off how fast fire departments respond.

In sunshine equivalents, 400-800 units of vitamin D = ~5 minutes of midday sun/skin exposure; 8000 units = ~1 hour of midday sun/skin exposure. If you are not getting 30-60 minutes of midday sunshine, you do not have optimal blood levels of vitamin D.
Around 42% of the adult U.S. population has low blood levels of vitamin D. That figure rises in northern latitudes to almost everybody in winter months.

The liver stores about 3 months of this fat-soluble vitamin, so doctors inject up to 300,000 units for wintertime protection in vulnerable D-deficient subjects. Forget blood tests, presume you are D-deficient in winter. Don’t wait for cold and flu symptoms.
Take 50,000 units of vitamin D on the first hint of cold or flu symptoms for a day or two. Otherwise you will endure ~7-8 days of misery until your adaptive immune system kicks in and produces B in bone marrow and T cells the thymus gland to produce tailor-made antibodies against the particular strain of coronavirus in circulation

How to handle an over-responsive immune system
One of the problems with the human immune system is that it over-responds. Over-aggressive arrival of neutrophils can induce deadly inflammation in the lungs.
To normalize the immune response so the neutrophils don’t over-respond to produce inflammation themselves that then results in your lungs filling up with fluid, vitamin D and the red wine molecule resveratrol normalize the immune response. Resveratrol by itself is a potent anti-viral agent against coronavirus. In a lab dish, resveratrol “completely blocked viral replication even at a low concentration.”

Zinc to the rescue
With advancing age humans are increasingly susceptible to viral infection. A Harvard Medical School Health Bulletin says: “No one knows for sure why this happens, but some scientists observe that this increased risk (with advancing age) correlates with a decrease in T cells, possibly from the thymus atrophying (shrinking) with age and producing fewer T cells to fight off infection.” Don’t believe this.
T-cells are produced in the thymus gland, located under your breastplate bone. Freshly-made T cells in the thymus will generate tailor-made antibodies against the particular strain of virus you are exposed to.

This age-related susceptibility to infection is associated with a significant reduction in the magnitude of the viral T-cell response. T cells generate a memory antibody response and are able to clear viruses and protect against lethal infection. T-cells produce life-long immunity.
The thymus gland shrinks from the size of a walnut in youth to the size of a pea in old age. This is largely due to lack of intake or poor absorption of the trace mineral zinc.
Zinc inhibits growth and replication of RNA viruses like coronaviruses.

The only food that contains an abundant amount of zinc is oysters. Sufficient zinc intake is only achievable from consumption of a variety of foods. Very young children are often picky eaters. Zinc deficiency is rampant among young children throughout the world. For example, studies showed 70% of children under age 5 in Vietnam were zinc deficient and 49% in Colombia.
Zinc lozenges that provide 18 milligrams or more of zinc gluconate or acetate (zinc acetate is the best, and don’t swallow them) can rapidly quell a common-cold virus like the coronavirus. Orally-ingested tablets, liquid and syrups are less effective. Be watchful, many brands of zinc lozenges do not provide enough zinc. Zinc lozenges shorten common colds by 6-7 days.

Coronavirus propaganda
Don’t be duped by all the fear-evoking news reports. Turn off the television.
You would never imagine public health authorities plan these epidemics. The current planned epidemic eerily follows the script of the 2011 movie CONTAGION, which shows the virus originating with a bat in China. Just like the human immune system can over-respond to infection, the World Health Organization and the Centers for Disease Control over-react to the imagined pandemic. In either case, vitamin D is the antidote. Be wary of what you read in news reports. An uninformed populace is blind. Remember, in the land of the blind, the one-eyed man is king.

eta: if the Wuhan flu is actually a hemorrhagic bioweapon, all bets are off...
 

summerthyme

Administrator
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If Bill Sardi thinks the average American is any less "malnourished" than the average Chinese, he's not very bright. Fatter, sure... but the American diet is woefully lacking in almost all essential and trace vitamins and minerals.

And the fact that he's saying this is "just a cold virus" puts the whole article in the "useless propaganda" file for me.

Summerthyme
 
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