Contagion Preps for coronavirus

Old Gray Mare

Has No Life - Lives on TB
These are the preps I'm currently working on for my family - just in case:

talk to healthcare professional about appropriate care & treatment for family members
Get supplies needed to set up a sick/quarantine room
Make sure appropriate OTC medications and scripts are filled and in date
Have ready to eat or easy to prepare meals like canned soup in stock, flavored Jello
Some rehydration fluid or powders could be a good thing to have on hand (Pedialyte for nutrients and electrolytes, I also like: Emergen-C - no I don't buy stock in either company)
Paper towels, baby wipes, disposable plates and cups could come in handy
cleaning and sanitation supplies
Check medical equipment thermometer and BP cuff.
A supply of good old fashion tea

I may pick up some CURCUMIN. ainitfunny seems to set store by it.

I'm just a concerned Mom not a health care professional.
 
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TxGal

Day by day
I just ordered more N95 masks on Amazon. Thanks for the heads up on the other thread, they are running out fast. Needless to say, prices appear to be up, also.

Next is the usual check the preps, get ahead on food & household items, double check meds/colds and flu supplies, get livestock feed a bit ahead, keep cars up on gasoline. We'll definitely make a concerted effort to shop off hours when needed, but ideally not need to shop much. We're in between two major college towns...needless to say we're cautious.
 
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alpha

Veteran Member
For the record... any speculation regarding weaponized source in subsequent threads should be tempered with the following knowledge. With the earth's diminishing magnetic field combined with the approaching solar minimum, cosmic radiation penetration to our planet has been on the increase for several years now. Substantial scientific evidence exists which indicates that viral mutation (among other areas) is on the rise.
Despite the fact that this is a doom prepping site, knowledge is our best weapon looking forward.

Electron Flux and Cosmic Ray Anomaly Before H1N1 Outbreak
Abstract Climate change manifestations are not only observed as vanishing glaciers, erratic rainfall sudden rise intemperature but disease outbreak also. Space weather environment study has been attempted to infer the H1N1early warning. Continuous low electron flux anomaly has been observed before the occurrence of the H1N1pandemics in Mexico in March 2009.The anomaly was recorded by Sun Observatory Heliospheric Observatory anextra-terrestrial satellite of NASA. During the period of low electron flux anomalous rise in the cosmic ray intensityhas been recorded locally in Mexico City cosmic ray observatory. This paper shows preliminary evidence of possibleearly warning of influenza by using remotely sensed data from satellite as a manifestation of climate change.
more...

Cosmic Rays, Neutrons And The Mutation Rate In Evolution
If background levels of neutron radiation can explain errors in computer memory, then it should also explain errors in DNA replication.
more...

Weakened magnetic field, cosmic rays and Zika virus outbreak
The Zika virus outbreak in 2015 posed a serious public health threat because of its association with conge-nital abnormalities. Research on the environmental factors underlying this outbreak epidemiology may pro-vide useful insights into its occurrence. This study suggests that the localized lowering of the earth’s magnetic field intensity and a sudden increase of cosmic rays recorded in Mexico in 2015 were causally associated with the resurgence of the Zika virus outbreak in the Americas. Potential mechanisms by which a weakened magnetic field and enhanced cosmic ray activity may influence this outbreak in humans are dis-cussed here. Current and future surveillance efforts should be supported to construct a comprehensive early warning system involving monitoring of the earth’s magnetic field, solar activity and cosmic ray intensity for predicting or detecting future Zika virus outbreaks as early as possible.
more...

Viral Mutation Rates
Accurate estimates of virus mutation rates are important to understand the evolution of the viruses and to combat them. However, methods of estimation are varied and often complex. Here, we critically review over 40 original studies and establish criteria to facilitate comparative analyses. The mutation rates of 23 viruses are presented as substitutions per nucleotide per cell infection (s/n/c) and corrected for selection bias where necessary, using a new statistical method. The resulting rates range from 10−8 to10−6 s/n/c for DNA viruses and from 10−6 to 10−4 s/n/c for RNA viruses. Similar to what has been shown previously for DNA viruses, there appears to be a negative correlation between mutation rate and genome size among RNA viruses, but this result requires further experimental testing. Contrary to some suggestions, the mutation rate of retroviruses is not lower than that of other RNA viruses. We also show that nucleotide substitutions are on average four times more common than insertions/deletions (indels). Finally, we provide estimates of the mutation rate per nucleotide per strand copying, which tends to be lower than that per cell infection because some viruses undergo several rounds of copying per cell, particularly double-stranded DNA viruses. A regularly updated virus mutation rate data set will be available at www.uv.es/rsanjuan/virmut.
The mutation rate is a critical parameter for understanding viral evolution and has important practical implications. For instance, the estimate of the mutation rate of HIV-1 demonstrated that any single mutation conferring drug resistance should occur within a single day and that simultaneous treatment with multiple drugs was therefore necessary (72). Also, in theory, viruses with high mutation rates could be combated by the administration of mutagens (1, 5, 21, 44, 53, 83). This strategy, called lethal mutagenesis, has proved effective in cell cultures or animal models against several RNA viruses, including enteroviruses (11, 39, 44), aphtoviruses (83), vesiculoviruses (44), hantaviruses (10), arenaviruses (40), and lentiviruses (15, 53), and appears to at least partly contribute to the effectiveness of the combined ribavirin-interferon treatment against hepatitis C virus (HCV) (13). The viral mutation rate also plays a role in the assessment of possible vaccination strategies (16), and it has been shown to influence the stability of live attenuated polio vaccines (91). Finally, at both the epidemiological and evolutionary levels, the mutation rate is one of the factors that can determine the risk of emergent infectious disease, i.e., pathogens crossing the species barrier (46).
Slight changes of the mutation rate can also determine whether or not some virus infections are cleared by the host immune system and can produce dramatic differences in viral fitness and virulence (75, 90), clearly stressing the need to have accurate estimates. However, our knowledge of viral mutation rates is somewhat incomplete, partly due to the inherent difficulty of measuring a rare and random event but also due to several sources of bias, inaccuracy, and terminological confusion. One goal of our work is to provide an update of published mutation rate estimates, since the last authoritative reviews on viral mutation rates were published more than a decade ago (29, 30). We therefore present a comprehensive review of mutation rate estimates from over 40 original studies and 23 different viruses representing all the main virus types. A second, and perhaps more ambitious, goal of our study is to consolidate the published literature by dealing with what we regard as the two main problems in the field: the use of different units of measurement and the bias caused by selection.
The problem of units is linked to the different modes of replication in viruses. Under “stamping machine” or linear replication, multiple copies are made sequentially from the same template and the resulting progeny strands do not become templates until the progeny virions infect another cell. In contrast, under binary replication, progeny strands immediately become templates and hence the number of molecules doubles in each cycle of strand copying, increasing geometrically. This basic distinction leads to two different definitions of the mutation rate: per strand copying or per cell infection. If replication is stamping machine-like, there is only one cycle of strand copying per infected cell and hence the two units are equivalent. However, binary replication means that the virus completes several cycles of strand copying per cell. The actual replication mode of most viruses is probably intermediate between these two idealized cases, and although it is known to be closer to linear in some viruses (9, 19) and closer to binary in others (26, 55), it is often unknown. This leads to uncertainties in mutation rate estimates. For instance, in the case of poliovirus 1, the estimated rate per strand copying can vary by 10-fold depending on whether stamping machine or binary replication is assumed (27). Typically this difference in the unit of measurement has been overlooked in comparative studies. Here, we express published estimates in the same unit.
The other issue that we address is selection. In general, deleterious mutations tend to be eliminated and hence are less likely to be sampled than neutral ones, introducing a bias in mutation rate estimates. To avoid this problem, selective neutrality is sometimes enforced by the experimenter, such that the number of mutations increases linearly with time (58, 88). The opposite strategy is to focus on lethal mutations, which have necessarily appeared during the last cell infection cycle, thus establishing a direct and time-independent relationship between the observed mutation frequency and the underlying mutation rate (13, 37). In between these two special cases, an explicit correction for selection is needed. Even if the effect of each individual mutation on viral fitness is unknown, the effect of selection can be statistically accounted for as long as the number of mutations sampled for estimating mutation rates is large. We do this here using empirical information about the distribution of mutational fitness effects previously obtained for several viruses (6, 23, 73, 80). Importantly, the basic properties of this distribution appear to be well conserved (78), and hence the proposed method should be applicable to a wide variety of viruses.
Using the resulting mutation rate data, we retest some previously accepted general patterns, suggest new ones, infer the mode of replication of some viruses, and compare the rates of mutation to substitutions with those to insertions/deletions (indels).
more...

As you can see, there's adequate study from multiple, reliable sources to temper our impulse towards malevolent intervention. On the other hand, there's an excellent post by Switchback in the TB2K Q thread which addresses many preventative and preparedness considerations here...
 
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COelf

Contributing Member
Humidify the room with a sick person. Keep alcohol and bleach water handy to wipe surfaces often. If possible remove everything you can from the sick room so you don't have to clean it or worry about there being germs on it. Wear gloves to clean surfaces. Make sure any respiratory equipment (CPAPs, nebulizers, etc) are cleaned several times a day and wear gloves to do this. If medical gloves are not available to use a new pair of kitchen gloves and either bleach them or use alcohol after use. I like honey to soothe my throat and help with coughing. Hot toddies may be good for adults. I am sure everyone knows not to give children aspirin and use Tylenol. Have plenty because it seems fever is a common symptom.
98.6 is an average temperature for everyone and everyone is different. Know your temperature and if it increases slightly watch for signs of disease. A serious temperature in infants 3 months or younger is 100.4 rectally and 102.2 for 3-12 month- olds. Adults with a fever over 103 is a concern. Do not be quick to lower a fever if it is less than serious. Fever can help fight infections, just make sure the ill person is well hydrated. I would be concerned about allowing a fever in younger children and would probably lower the fever.
 

forpetesake

Contributing Member
I recall when the SARS epidemic was a concern that a nurse recommended keeping the patient "on the dry side". I took that to mean don't push the fluids. Maybe because of the potential for fluid perfusion to the lungs. Anyone have any thoughts on that?
 
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Old Gray Mare

Has No Life - Lives on TB
Warning: If you have masks that have been in storage for awhile you may want to check them. Back during the H5N1 scare I bought a case of containers of N95 masks. They were correctly stored in a cool dark place, a metal cabinet in the basement. Over time the glue holding the filter to the plastic failed. It was the plastic part that looks like a pigs nose.

Without that filter correctly attached those N95's were merely fashion statements, useless for their intended tasks as PPE's.
 

SouthernBreeze

Veteran Member
There seems to be some confusion as to what is an appropriate mask. Surgical mask vs N95. Here is a 5:36 video on the differences.
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jq6Lq0y_NDY&feature=emb_logo
Yes. That's my question. I'll have to watch the video later. Can't watch it on this computer. Thanks! DH brought home 10 or 12 N95 masks from where he worked a few years ago. We have those, but want to get more. I was wondering about the surgical masks, and if they were the same.
 

h_oder

Veteran Member
Ordered some masks through Amazon, but they won't be here for about a week. Looked at Home Depot website and ordered a couple more boxes that they will deliver by end of day :) N95s on the way...
 

Old Gray Mare

Has No Life - Lives on TB

Old Gray Mare

Has No Life - Lives on TB
Yes. That's my question. I'll have to watch the video later. Can't watch it on this computer. Thanks! DH brought home 10 or 12 N95 masks from where he worked a few years ago. We have those, but want to get more. I was wondering about the surgical masks, and if they were the same.
All disposable masks are not created equal. IMHO those square gause masks are fashion statements offering little if any protection from air borne disease. They may help keep others from getting sick when someone infected coughs or sneezes, by containing some particles that would otherwise go airborne.

N95's, last time I checked were recommended as PPE's by the CDC against Flu virus. The virus itself is small enough to get thru the N95 mesh but it is the nature of the flu virus to clump together and the mask is designed to shield against those clumps.

N100 masks are available. They filter finer particles than the N95's.

Some disposable masks are designed not only to shield against airborne virus but fluid spater as well. They're more expensive.

It's been years since I've done any research on masks. At the time there weren't N95 masks for kids. The best I could get were some 3M N95's designed for: small adults.

For infants there was a infant smoke hood/evacuation mask but I'm not sure it was NIOSH certified. Also don't know if it would be safe to keep an infant in the hood for an extended period of time. It wasn't designed for that.

Just found out there are now N95's designed for welders with flame retardant layers in the masks.

Again I'm not a healthcare professional. My information is dated. YMMV.
 
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SouthernBreeze

Veteran Member
All masks are not created equal. IMHO those square gause masks are fashion statements offering little if any protection from air borne disease.

N95's, last time I checked were recommended as PPE's by the CDC against Flu virus. The virus itself is small enough to get thru the N95 mesh but it is the nature of the flu virus to clump together and the mask is designed to shield against those clumps.

N100 masks are available. They filter finer particles than the N95's.

Some disposable masks are designed not only to shield against airborne virus but fluid spater as well. They're more expensive.
Yes, thanks! DH is looking into ordering more N95's as I type this.
 

jward

passin' thru
What can an average person do to be prepared?
The basics for preparing for a pandemic is similar to preparing for a regional disaster, such as hurricane or ice storm, except for a few added precautions:
  • Have at least two weeks worth of stored food that does not need refrigeration. Don’t forget to store enough for kids, pets and other special diets. Increase your supplies if you have the means or the space.
  • Store enough water for your family for at least two weeks- the recommended amount is at least one gallon per person per day.
  • Have a power outage kit, which means backup lighting, cooking and communications, in case of power disruptions, Your car survival kit should also be fully stocked.
  • Have some emergency cash.
  • Keep a fully stocked first aid kit, complete with backup prescriptions
  • Make sure you also have toilet and sanitation provisions
  • Be aware – pay attention to the news, both mainstream and alternate sources.
Stock up on additional supplies including:
  • N-95 face masks
  • goggles
  • gloves
  • hand soap and antibacterial wipes
  • bleach – a good standby when in comes to disinfect surfaces. According to the Clorox website, use 2 tbsp bleach to one gallon of water, to sanitize a surface. Bleach loses its potency so always mix a fresh batch for cleaning.
  • garbage bags for disposal of waste
Bolster your Immune System
Strengthening your immune system is always good to do, whether there is a risk or pandemic or not:
  • Get enough sleep and rest.
  • Relax and avoid stress.
  • Exercise at least three to four days a week.
  • Eat a healthy diet. Take vitamin supplements if you feel you don’t eat well enough.
A few other tips:
Have a plan Decide in advance under what circumstances you would start keeping kids home from school, staying home from work or creating a sick room in your house.
Discuss your plan with family members and plan care giving tasks ahead of time.
Avoid crowds Being among lots of people increases your chances of getting contaminated. If you live in a condo or apartment complex, you would need to avoid common areas, possibly take the stairs that are used less frequently than elevators. If you must be around others, you’d need to wear a mask
Wash your hands Get everyone in the family in the habit of washing their hands as they come home from public places and before eating. If you cannot wash your hands right away, use antibacterial wipes.
Cover your mouth when you cough or sneeze Use tissues or a handkerchief to cover up and avoid spreading germs.
Stop touching your eyes and face Once you touch something with germs, and you touch near your eyes or mouth, you can instantly catch a disease. Be aware of this and if you cannot wash your hands right away, at least keep your hands away from your face.
Disinfect surfaces around you Droplets from coughing and sneezing travel several feet. These germ filled droplets can last for hours on surfaces such as paper, steel or plastic. For this reason, keep a box of antibacterial wipes and clean door knobs, light switches and other commonly touched items around you.
Learn basic first aid and herbal remedies If there is a pandemic, hospital emergency rooms and doctors’ office would be overwhelmed, and also filled with contagious people. If you had a minor issue such as a cut or a cold, and can take care of it at home using first aid or over the counter remedies, you are better off avoiding these places.
Recommended reading: If you are interested in finding out about the time when the Ebola virus made it all the way to Reston, VA, read The Hot Zone, a nonfiction story that is all the more scary because it really happened.
Preparing for a pandemic is similar to being prepared for other disasters. There is no need to panic or live in fear – being prepared will help you sleep better at night.


© Apartment Prepper 2014









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1 COMMENT ON HOW AN AVERAGE PERSON CAN PREPARE FOR A PANDEMIC
  1. Rhys APRIL 26, 2014 AT 8:45 AM
    Not a new book but if you are looking for an interesting and factual read on pandemics I strongly recommend “The Coming Plague – Newly emerging diseases in a world out of balance” by Laurie Garrett. Its from the 90’s but still relevant
 

Shooter

Veteran Member
went back to amazon, and looked at 3M N95 masks, a couple more are sold out, and others are saying will ship in 2 to 3 weeks, wich means right now they are out to,
 

nomifyle

Veteran Member
I added another jar of manuka honey, Amazon was having a sale on the brand I use. The sale is probably because they are changing the label. We use this product at the first sign of anything. I also have elderberry syrup and collital silver (all from ST when I bought the pain oil). Honestly, I have no clue on how to use the collital silver though. I'm short on water, it was raining pretty hard yesterday when I went to walmart, I'll make another trip tomorrow to stock back up on water.

Now if I could just remember to take my apple cider vinegar, diatomacheos earth and that yeast stuff recommended by Shane several years ago. I keep forgetting to do this when my IF window.

Judy
 

forpetesake

Contributing Member
I added another jar of manuka honey, Amazon was having a sale on the brand I use. The sale is probably because they are changing the label. We use this product at the first sign of anything. I also have elderberry syrup and collital silver (all from ST when I bought the pain oil). Honestly, I have no clue on how to use the collital silver though. I'm short on water, it was raining pretty hard yesterday when I went to walmart, I'll make another trip tomorrow to stock back up on water.

Now if I could just remember to take my apple cider vinegar, diatomacheos earth and that yeast stuff recommended by Shane several years ago. I keep forgetting to do this when my IF window.

Judy
No elderberry for this virus!! It might make your immune system ramp up too much, worsening a cytokine storm. YMMV
 

SouthernBreeze

Veteran Member
,I have to say that we're pretty much as prepared as we can be for any outbreak. Medical supplies, up to date OTC meds, cleaning supplies, and a stocked pantry. We're waiting for masks, but our safest bet when it comes to this new virus is to self quarantine. Given our age and my crazy immune system, it scares me! I don't think I want to rely on any type of mask to keep us safe were we to have to go out.
 

Old Gray Mare

Has No Life - Lives on TB
,I have to say that we're pretty much as prepared as we can be for any outbreak. Medical supplies, up to date OTC meds, cleaning supplies, and a stocked pantry. We're waiting for masks, but our safest bet when it comes to this new virus is to self quarantine. Given our age and my crazy immune system, it scares me! I don't think I want to rely on any type of mask to keep us safe were we to have to go out.
Can't argue with common sense.

Also; viruses seem to like to gain entry via mucus membranes. Those are not limited to the nose and mouth. Remember eye protection if this thing develops. Personally I'm not getting anything expensive or elaborate, not on my budget. Swim goggles will have to do.
 

Pinecone

Veteran Member
This is a little off the wall with the other discussions here, but for those who have family members on warfarin, we all know that the INR numbers are dependent on keeping a consistent diet. I'm stocking up on frozen broccolli in case we decide we just can't/won't go out or that supplies get scarce. Fresh only lasts so long. I'll also be starting lettuce in a window sill. Good luck to us all!
 

Old Gray Mare

Has No Life - Lives on TB
This is a little off the wall with the other discussions here, but for those who have family members on warfarin, we all know that the INR numbers are dependent on keeping a consistent diet. I'm stocking up on frozen broccolli in case we decide we just can't/won't go out or that supplies get scarce. Fresh only lasts so long. I'll also be starting lettuce in a window sill. Good luck to us all!
Pinecone have you thought about sprouts? Beans aren't the only edible sprouts: radish, beet and broccoli to name a few. Just a thought.
 

Krayola

Veteran Member
I worry now that we will get regular flu and won't know if we should take elderberry at first symptoms because we won't know if it is flu or new virus. If regular flu, we may miss early window to take the elderberry and this is supposed to be one of the worst flu seasons on record. :(

Regarding the masks, my understanding is that N95 or above is recommended. However, I was recently looking into this and saw some info on PubMed.

Info said that in the lab, N95 was the best for influenza but in the clinical setting, didn't seem to make much difference. Some studies have shown that when healthcare workers just wear a regular mask (not N95) that there was no statistical difference in how many got sick. So get the N95 if you can but use the other mask if you can't get N95.
 

Krayola

Veteran Member
Article from New York Times:



Do Face Masks Really Keep You Healthy?

By Richard Klasco, M.D.

March 23, 2018

Q. How effective are antimicrobial “courtesy masks” at preventing the spread of contagious airborne illnesses?

A.
The best evidence suggests that, when sick, wearing a mask can help to protect others from getting sick. And when well, wearing a mask around those who are sick will probably decrease your own chances of becoming infected. But the masks are far from foolproof.

Courtesy masks, or what we doctors refer to as surgical masks, were introduced into the operating room in the late 1800s. They quickly became popular among a public eager to protect itself against the influenza pandemic of 1918.

A century later, the advent of modern molecular techniques confirmed that surgical masks can indeed provide good protection against flu. In a 2013 study, researchers counted the number of virus particles in the air around patients with flu. They found that surgical masks decreased the exhalation of large viral droplets 25-fold. The masks were, however, less effective against the fine viral droplets that can remain suspended in the air longer and are therefore more infectious, cutting them by 2.8 times.

Surgical masks also afford fairly good protection for the worried well. In an oft-cited study of 446 nurses, researchers found surgical masks were as good, or nearly as good, at protecting the wearer against flu as respirators, a somewhat more high-tech, masklike device used in hospitals.

The work of Australian investigators provides further support for the value of the simple surgical mask. They estimate that in a home setting, wearing a surgical mask decreases a well person’s risk of getting sick by 60 percent to 80 percent.

Unfortunately, most people fail to wear a mask faithfully enough to achieve this degree of protection, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention remains equivocal about the use of masks outside of health care settings. “No recommendation can be made at this time for mask use in the community by asymptomatic persons, including those at high risk for complications, to prevent exposure to influenza viruses,” the agency concludes on its website.

If you don’t have a mask, or don’t want to wear one, standing at least six feet from an infected person will increase your chances for staying healthy. The air surrounding sick people, even if they aren’t coughing or sneezing, is loaded with small infectious aerosolized particles, and the farther you are from them, the better.

Washing your hands frequently, of course, is also critical for staying healthy, since touching infected fingers to the eyes, nose or mouth can transmit infection.

A version of this article appears in print on March 27, 2018, Section D, Page 5 of the New York edition.

Do Face Masks Really Keep You Healthy?
 

Krayola

Veteran Member
Sorry I just don't have time to copy and paste these...but here is a list of studies I found about masks that relates to my prior posts in this thread:

Face mask use and control of respiratory virus transmission in households.
Face mask use and control of respiratory virus transmission in households. - PubMed - NCBI

Surgical mask vs N95 respirator for preventing influenza among health care workers: a randomized trial.
Surgical mask vs N95 respirator for preventing influenza among health care workers: a randomized trial. - PubMed - NCBI


N95 Respirators vs Medical Masks for Preventing Influenza Among Health Care Personnel: A Randomized Clinical Trial
N95 Respirators vs Medical Masks for Preventing Influenza Among Health Care Personnel: A Randomized Clinical Trial. - PubMed - NCBI

Effectiveness of N95 respirators versus surgical masks in protecting health care workers from acute respiratory infection: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
Effectiveness of N95 respirators versus surgical masks in protecting health care workers from acute respiratory infection: a systematic review and ... - PubMed - NCBI


A cluster randomized clinical trial comparing fit-tested and non-fit-tested N95 respirators to medical masks to prevent respiratory virus infection in health care workers.
A cluster randomized clinical trial comparing fit-tested and non-fit-tested N95 respirators to medical masks to prevent respiratory virus infection... - PubMed - NCBI
 
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summerthyme

Administrator
_______________
No elderberry for this virus!! It might make your immune system ramp up too much, worsening a cytokine storm. YMMV
I strongly disagree. I'm not really seeing indications of cytokine storm *so far* in the reporting, and one hint that it isn't a major feature is the fact that fatalities so far have been mostly elderly or people with co-morbidities. Cytokine storm is generally a problem for the young and healthy... the reason so many young adults in the prime of their lives died in the 1918 flu epidemic.

Taken *early*, it should prevent the virus from reproducing, which is the key to keeping the viral load low... which is one of the main keys to preventing a cytokine storm.

Here are some links to an effective disinfectant, at a very good price. Sorry, I don't want to retype the whole thing again..

Summerthyme
 

Heliobas Disciple

Has No Life - Lives on TB
I posted this on the main thread, copying it here too.

I Always keep a lot of hydrogen peroxide on hand and have it in spray bottles and spray everything down at home and in my car.

I found this product on Amazon a while back and saved the link. The product is the same in all the bottles, the spray mechanism is the only thing that's different. Some are a stream, some are a mist. You'd have to read the description. i'm not a doctor so this isn't a medical recommendation, and I don't know if it really works or the manufacturer is just hyping it, but the description says it works on colds and conavirus (not this one specifically of course). So may be a good thing to buy as well. I especially like that it's not toxic and can be used around children and pets.





HD
 

forpetesake

Contributing Member
I strongly disagree. I'm not really seeing indications of cytokine storm *so far* in the reporting, and one hint that it isn't a major feature is the fact that fatalities so far have been mostly elderly or people with co-morbidities. Cytokine storm is generally a problem for the young and healthy... the reason so many young adults in the prime of their lives died in the 1918 flu epidemic.

Taken *early*, it should prevent the virus from reproducing, which is the key to keeping the viral load low... which is one of the main keys to preventing a cytokine storm.

Here are some links to an effective disinfectant, at a very good price. Sorry, I don't want to retype the whole thing again..

Summerthyme
I see what you're saying Summerthyme. I was assuming since it is similar to SARS that it would incite a cytokine storm. That may not be the case. I guess I'm a little jumpy :)
 

Old Gray Mare

Has No Life - Lives on TB
It might or might not be a good time for some preventive maintenance. The family recently went to the Dentist and each member got a clean bill of health. Eye glass scripts and eye ware were also updated. It's nice to have spares! I don't want the family or me in a waiting room full of sick, contagious people if we can avoid it.

The cars have recently been gone over by the mechanic and had an oil change.

The fire extinguisher is charged and in date.
 

Pinecone

Veteran Member
Pinecone have you thought about sprouts? Beans aren't the only edible sprouts: radish, beet and broccoli to name a few. Just a thought.
Thanks OGM. It's a great idea. I would be leary of doing that though, unless it was an emergency as we don't have a baseline idea of how that would work with the current INR numbers. Everything affects it. I'll keep it in mind though!
 

jward

passin' thru
I see what you're saying Summerthyme. I was assuming since it is similar to SARS that it would incite a cytokine storm. That may not be the case. I guess I'm a little jumpy :)
With older, infirm folks being the ones subcoming, there's good reason to believe cytonic storm is not presently a problem. Always a decision one need make for oneself, but I am loaded up on elderberry tincture and plan to use it.

What i wonder about is using olive leaf extract as an antiviral?
 

nomifyle

Veteran Member
No elderberry for this virus!! It might make your immune system ramp up too much, worsening a cytokine storm. YMMV
Thanks I'd forgotten about that, what about goldenseal echinessa? We just usually don't go out and about, and I'm sure that's due to that we didn't catch all the crud that went around late fall, most that got sick had had their flu shots.

Judy
 

forpetesake

Contributing Member
Thanks I'd forgotten about that, what about goldenseal echinessa? We just usually don't go out and about, and I'm sure that's due to that we didn't catch all the crud that went around late fall, most that got sick had had their flu shots.

Judy
Judy,

I think echinacea would do the same thing, but if there's no tendency for a cytokine storm, I think it would be good. Also, I'm not a doctor, just trying to come up with ideas for at home care :)
 

forpetesake

Contributing Member
With older, infirm folks being the ones subcoming, there's good reason to believe cytonic storm is not presently a problem. Always a decision one need make for oneself, but I am loaded up on elderberry tincture and plan to use it.

What i wonder about is using olive leaf extract as an antiviral?
I'm not a doctor, but I would consider any antiviral. I think I would add olive leaf extract to my arsenal. We're all just punting at this point!
 

summerthyme

Administrator
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Don't forget resveratrol. Pinot noir wine, or a good purple grape juice are decent sources. Japanese knotweed root (it's an invasive weed on the roadside around here) is very high in resveratrol. Or you can buy it in capsule form at a herb shop. It's a potent antiviral.

Echinacea is an immune system booster... good *unless* you're worried about cytokine storm. However, it's not a "treatment"... it should be taken before exposure, to help optimize your immune response. If you take it daily, your body essentially stops responding to it, so make sure you take a week's "vacation " from taking it every month to 6 weeks...

Summerthyme
 

Illini Warrior

Veteran Member

The researchers studied naproxen's antiviral activity against influenza A and influenza B. It had previously been reported that naproxen had some effect against influenza A. What was found in this study is that naproxen inhibited virus replication both in the culture medium (in vitro) as well as in mice (in vivo). And as you know, mice and rats are common guinea pigs for medical experiments.

Not only that, the researchers also found that naproxen was better than oseltamivir (Tamiflu) in mice. And naproxen is more effective against influenza B than influenza A. (If the flu viruses would now just identify themselves when they infect, that would be super helpful.)

The authors conclude, "If naproxen is an effective anti-influenza drug for humans, it could be implemented into influenza treatment protocols more quickly than other antivirals in development."

In a nutshell, their preliminary research shows that Aleve is more effective than Tamiflu. In mice. Like the disclaimer above says, I'm not a doctor and this isn't medical advice. You need to talk to your doctor before using any medication.
 

forpetesake

Contributing Member
Why don't we all discuss what possible herbs/home treatments we might be able to use? Here's my list, in no particular order. I would welcome feedback:

Resveratrol
Vitamin C
Green tea
Garlic capsules
St John's Wort
Skullcap tea
Quercin/bromelain
Curcumin/bioperine (I think Summertime said take this late in the infection)
Shiitake mushroom capsules
Mint tea
 
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