CORONA Main Coronavirus thread

jward

passin' thru
I tell you, it's getting pretty ugly out there- so many krazy Karens out there that I'm now as likely to cross the street to avoid old white gals as I am young folk :: shake head :: who's winding these witches up? Madcow? CNN? Facebook group think groups? The source is toxic mold, and need be eliminated with extreme prejudice.

Karlyn Borysenko - on Parler/Minds/Gab @Karlyn

@DrKarlynB

11m

Today on
@glennbeck
's show, I talked about how the masks are dehumanizing people. Case in point: Grown woman wishes death upon two young children because they aren't wearing masks and seems to think this is completely normal.
View: https://twitter.com/DrKarlynB/status/1288270774747443202?s=20
 

Issy

Senior Member
Father, son with COVID-19 forced into facility after breaking quarantine

In a first, 2 detained in McCully are forced into mandatory COVID-19 quarantine

By HNN Staff | July 28, 2020 at 11:46 AM HST - Updated July 28 at 3:55 PM

HONOLULU, Hawaii (HawaiiNewsNow) - A father and son who have tested positive for COVID-19 were ordered into quarantine at a facility on Tuesday after being detained at a strip mall in McCully.

Hawaii News Now has learned the two are from Florida but have been staying in Hawaii.

Authorities say the son, a teenager, was detained after being spotted at McCully Shopping Center about 7:30 a.m. Tuesday.

State Health Department Director Bruce Anderson told Hawaii News Now the teen “refused to comply with the isolation order and was out with his friends and exposing lots of people."

He called the situation “an imminent threat to public health.”

Shortly after the teen was taken into custody, the boy’s father ― who is also positive for COVID-19 ― showed up at the shopping center. At that point, the father was also detained.

A short time later, Anderson signed an order forcing the two into a designated COVID-19 isolation facility. It’s the first order of its kind in Hawaii since the pandemic began.

Anderson said the order is based on a rarely-used authority he has to protect public health.

“The last order I signed 20 years ago, had to deal with an individual with tuberculosis who was non-compliant and would not isolate.”

After the order was complete, Emergency Medical Services personnel transported the father and son from the shopping center to the designated COVID-19 facility on Kaaahi Street.

HNN cameras spotted the ambulance surrounded by a dozen Honolulu police cars. The two were screened before being taken to a room.

Law enforcement will be posted outside their door at the facility, which was intended for homeless people who are positive or exposed to the virus.

The state’s order is good for 10 days. At that point, Anderson said, the two would be evaluated and possibly tested again to determine if they need to be isolated further.

If they do, DOH would need permission from the court.

 

marsh

TB Fanatic
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e9kIj_B8iLU
26:09 min
Wuhan lab signs deal to expand potential bio-warfare abilities; Regime takeover shows CCP infighting
•Premiered 97 minutes ago


China in Focus - NTD

China denied knowing about a case involving a Singapore spy, who pleaded guilty in the US to working for China. He had access to the F-35B fighter jet program.

The Wuhan Lab has signed an agreement with Pakistan to expand potential bio-warfare capabilities, including several research projects related to deadly bacterias.

China's largest online travel company C-trip is in talks to delist from the American stock market.

The University of Hong Kong fired a leading pro-democracy activist from his tenured position. And Hong Kong’s financial and political spheres are starting to feel the impact of the new law.

And in a rare case of public defiance, a Chinese conglomerate criticized the authorities and made an accusation of corruption. Why does the company dare to do so? Its background reveals escalated infightings between factions of the Chinese Communist Party.
 

Heliobas Disciple

Has No Life - Lives on TB
(fair use applies)

Even mild coronavirus cases can cause lasting cardiovascular damage, study shows
Kathryn Krawczyk
July 28 2020 1:27 p.m.

If you needed another reason to avoid coronavirus at all costs, here's one.

Skeptics of the disease and the necessity of shutting down the economy to stop its spread have focused on the fact that most coronavirus cases have been mild or even asymptomatic, mistakenly comparing COVID-19 to "just the flu." But a recent study of 100 recovered coronavirus patients reveals 78 of them now have lasting cardiovascular damage even though a vast majority of them had mild cases of COVID-19 in the first place.

The study published Monday in JAMA Cardiology details the results of cardiac MRI exams of 100 recovered coronavirus patients. Twenty-eight of them required oxygen supplementation while fighting the virus, while just two were on ventilators. But 78 of them still had cardiovascular abnormalities after recovery, with 60 of them showing "ongoing myocardial inflammation," the study shows. These conditions appeared to be independent of case severity and pre-existing conditions, though JAMA researchers note these findings need a larger study.

President Trump and his administration have tried to say America's low coronavirus mortality rate proves the country is beating the virus. But not only is COVID-19's mortality rate not as low as Trump has claimed; this study proves there are far more consequences of catching coronavirus than just dying of it.

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Heliobas Disciple

Has No Life - Lives on TB
More on COVID and the heart.

(fair use applies)

Covid-19's impact on the heart: Two new studies suggest 'the plot thickening'
By Jacqueline Howard
Updated 8:45 PM ET, Tue July 28, 2020

Since the coronavirus pandemic first began, evidence has emerged showing that Covid-19 can damage more than the lungs.

The disease caused by the novel coronavirus can harm other organs in the body -- including the heart -- and now two separate studies, published in the journal JAMA Cardiology on Monday, provide more insight into how Covid-19 may have a prolonged impact on heart health in those who have recovered from illness and may have caused cardiac infection in those who died.

"We've understood for a few months now that Covid-19 is not only a respiratory infection but a multi-system infection," said cardiologist Dr. Nieca Goldberg, medical director of the NYU Women's Heart Program and senior adviser for women's health strategy at NYU Langone Health in New York, who was not involved in either study.

"There is an acute inflammatory response, increased blood clotting and cardiac involvement. And the cardiac involvement can either be due to direct involvement of the heart muscle by the infection and its inflammatory response. It could be due to blood clots that are formed, causing an obstruction of arteries," Goldberg said.

"Sometimes people have very fast heart rates that can, over time, weaken the heart muscle, reduce the heart muscle function. So there are multiple ways during this infection that it can involve the heart."

Inflammation of the heart

One of the JAMA Cardiology studies found that, among 100 adults who recently recovered from Covid, 78% showed some type of cardiac involvement in MRI scans and 60% had ongoing inflammation in the heart.

The study included patients ages 45 to 53 who were from the University Hospital Frankfurt Covid-19 Registry in Germany. They were recruited for the study between April and June. Most of the patients -- 67-- recovered at home, with the severity of their illness ranging from some being asymptomatic to having moderate symptoms.

The researchers used cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, blood tests and biopsy of heart tissue. Those data were compared with a group of 50 healthy volunteers and 57 volunteers with some underlying health conditions or risk factors.

The MRI data revealed that people infected with coronavirus had some sort of heart involvement regardless of any preexisting conditions, the severity or course of their infection, the time from their original diagnosis or the presence of any specific heart-related symptoms.

The most common heart-related abnormality in the Covid-19 patients was myocardial inflammation or abnormal inflammation of the heart muscle, which can weaken it.

This type of inflammation, also called myocarditis, is usually caused by a viral infection, Goldberg said, adding that she was not surprised by these study results.

"What they're saying in this study is that you can identify myocardial involvement or heart involvement by magnetic resonance imaging," Goldberg said.

The study has some limitations. More research is needed to determine whether similar findings would emerge among a larger group of patients, those younger than 18 and those currently battling coronavirus infection instead of just recovering from it.

"These findings indicate the need for ongoing investigation of the long-term cardiovascular consequences of COVID-19," the researchers wrote.

'This infection does not follow one path'

In the other JAMA Cardiology study, an analysis of autopsies found that coronavirus could be identified in the heart tissue of Covid-19 patients who died.

The study included data from 39 autopsy cases from Germany between April 8 and April 18. The patients, ages 78 to 89, had tested positive for Covid-19 and the researchers analyzed heart tissue from their autopsies.

The researchers found that 16 of the patients had virus in their heart tissue, but did not show signs of unusual sudden inflammation in the heart or myocarditis. It's not clear what this means, the researchers said.

The sample of autopsy cases was small and the "elderly age of the patients might have influenced the results," the researchers wrote. More research is needed whether similar findings would emerge among a younger group of patients.

"I think both of these studies are important," Goldberg said.

"One pretty much shows that the MRI scan can help diagnose the myocardial injury that occurs due to Covid and it was confirmed on biopsy," she said. "The autopsy study showed us something else that's interesting -- that you can have viral presence but not the acute inflammatory process. So this infection does not follow one path."

'An increasingly complex puzzle'

Both studies "add to an increasingly complex puzzle" when it comes to the novel coronavirus named SARS-CoV-2, Dr. Dave Montgomery, founding cardiologist at the PREvent Clinic in Sandy Springs, Georgia, said in an email on Tuesday.

"Taken together the studies support that SARS-CoV-2 does not have to cause clinical myocarditis in order to find the virus in large numbers and the inflammatory response in myocardial tissue. In other words, one can have no or mild symptoms of heart involvement in order to actually cause damage," said Montgomery, who was not involved in the studies.

"Viruses in general have a way of making their way to organs that are quite remote from the original site of infection. SARS-CoV-2 is no different in this regard," he said. "What is different is that this virus seems to preferentially affect cardiac cells and the surrounding cells. These studies suggest that the heart can be infected with no clear signs. Personally, in my practice, we have seen similar signs of inflammation, including pericardial effusions," or fluid around the sac of the heart.

Dr. Clyde Yancy of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and Dr. Gregg Fonarow of the University of California, Los Angeles, co-authored an editorial that accompanied the two new studies in the journal JAMA Cardiology on Monday.

"We see the plot thickening and we are inclined to raise a new and very evident concern that cardiomyopathy and heart failure related to COVID-19 may potentially evolve as the natural history of this infection becomes clearer," Yancy and Fonarow wrote in the editorial.

"We wish not to generate additional anxiety but rather to incite other investigators to carefully examine existing and prospectively collect new data in other populations to con- firm or refute these findings," they wrote.

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Heliobas Disciple

Has No Life - Lives on TB
(fair use applies)

Scientists identify 21 drugs that show promise for treating COVID-19 - including four that might be used with remdesivir to combat the virus

By Natalie Rahhal
Published: 20:35 EDT, 28 July 2020 | Updated: 21:54 EDT, 28 July 2020

  • Researchers at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute in California screened 12,000 drugs for potential to fight coronavirus
  • They found 21 - including remdesivir, which had not yet been given emergency approval - that showed antiviral activity when tested in a cell-like fluid in the lab
  • Of those, there were 13 that could likely be given at safe doses to COVID-19 patients
  • Four drugs were especially promising because they could be used in combination with remdesivir, which has now been shown to fight coronavirus
Scientists have identified 21 compounds that could help treat coronavirus, including everything from an already-approved leprosy drug to a failed allergy drug and experimental cancer treatments, recent study reveals.

And 13 of those drugs have already proven safe at doses that are unlikely to pose dangers to coronavirus patients in trials for other purposes, according to the study published in Nature.

The researchers from Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute in California are particularly encouraged by finding that four of the drugs might work well in combination with remdesivir, which the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has already given emergency approval to treat COVID-19.

Now, they're using miniature lung 'organoids' grown in labs to further test the drugs' potential to treat the infection that's killed more than 140,000 Americans since January.

Currently, the only drug with emergency use authorization (EUA) from the FDA is remdesivir, an antiviral that failed to treat Ebola but has been shown to reduce the risk that a patient will die of COVID-by 30 to 62 percent.

After winning the same designation from the FDA, the controversial, Trump-backed drug hydroxychloroquine was stripped of its EUA.

Blood plasma from coronavirus survivors is also approved as an experimental treatment for COVID-19 and has been deemed safe, but how well it works is still under investigation.

The cheap steroid dexamethasone has proven perhaps the most promising drug to treat coronavirus in studies in the UK and is already approved for other uses in the US, but studies on its efficacy for treating coronavirus are in progress there.

Dozens more drugs have been tried and failed to save lives from the devastating respiratory infection.

That leaves the field wide open for additional treatments - and thousands of patients badly in need of them.

In an effort to identify the drugs with the most potential, the Sanford scientists screened an exhaustive database of over 12,000 drugs, called the ReFrame drug repurposing collection.

The library consists of drugs that have been approved by the FDA for some uses but could have others, drugs that failed to treat the condition they were developed to address, and those still in trials.

Senior study author Dr Sumit Chanda partnered with the Hong Kong scientists who discovered the first known SARS virus to expedite the process of screening the exhaustive list of drugs against viruses like SARS-CoV-2.

They narrowed the list of 12,000 down to 21 compounds or already fully developed drugs with promise for treating coronavirus.

After putting the drugs in a petri dish with SARS-CoV-2, the researchers discovered:

FOUR DRUGS THAT MAY WORK HAND-IN-HAND WITH REMDESIVIR AT SAFE DOSES FOR COVID-19 PATIENTS

1. CLOFAZIMINE

What was it made to treat?

Clofazimine fights the bacteria that cause leprosy, a disease that was long untreatable, disfiguring and often deadly. The drug isn't exactly a sniper for the bacteria but can gradually kill it off, slowing the growth of the infection.

Is it FDA approved?

Yes. Clofazimine was approved in the US in 1986, but is no longer commercially sold there.

How might it fight coronavirus?

Scientists don't yet know why the antibacterial drug seems to combat the virus, but it's currently in clinical trials in combination with other drugs.

2. HANFANGCHIN A (TETRANDRINE)

What was it made to treat?

Hanfangchin A is actually a derivative of chloroquine, an older form of the controversial malaria drug hydroxychloroquine. It's shown promise for treating malaria that's resistant to its parent-compound and cancer.

Is it FDA approved?

No. Tetrandrine is in phase 3 trials for treating both illnesses.

How might it fight coronavirus?

In the Sanford petri dish tests, it seemed to block SARS-CoV-2 from entering cells - but it's worth noting that hydroxychloroquine appeared similarly promising in lab tests, but those results have not been repeated reliably when the drug was given to actual COVID-19 patients.

3. APILIMOD

What was it made to treat?

Apilimod is under development to treat autoimmune diseases and cancer. It was made to treat Crohn's disease and rheumatoid arthritis, but has also shown potential to work against cancer and viruses (aside from the one that causes COVID-19).

Is it FDA approved?

No. The drug is phase II trials.

How might it fight coronavirus?

Like Tetrandrine, the drug shows promise for keeping the virus from entering cells. It seems to prevent a process by which cells take in other matter from occurring.

4. ONO 5334

What was it made to treat?

ONO 5334 is an experimental osteoporosis drug made to keep bone from being reabsorbed.

Is it FDA approved?

No. It's currently in phase 2 trials to test how safely it can treat patients with the bone deterioration condition.

How might it fight coronavirus?

ONO 5334 also seems to prevent SARS-CoV-2 from entering human cells. It blocks the activity of an enzyme that may be involved in how a virus infects cells.


DRUGS IDENTIFIED BY LAB TESTS THAT ARE ALREADY APPROVED OR AUTHORIZED BY THE FDA

5. REMDESIVIR

The Sanford study began before results of the NIH's remdesivir trial were released and independently identified its potential for treating COVID-19.

6. ASTEMIZOLE

Astemizole was granted FDA approval to treat allergies, but has since been withdrawn over concerns it may cause dangerous heart arrhythmias - the same side effect that eventually led the agency to revoke authorization for hydroxychloroquine to treat COVID-19.

15 ADDITIONAL DRUGS IN EARLY PHASES OF RESEARCH THAT SHOWED PROMISE FOR TREATING COVID-19

7. MLN-3897 - An experimental drug for treating bone and inflammatory diseases, the compound had mysteriously antiviral effects.

8. ELOPIPRAZOLE - An antipsychotic drug in phase 2 tests, it's unclear why it had antiviral effects.

9. SDZ-62-434 - A cancer drug in phase 1 studies, the drug had showed potential benefits against the virus, but the mechanism is unclear.

10. YH-1238 - Being tested in phase 1 studies, the compound is designed to treat stomach ulcers.

11. DS-6930 - A drug in early phases of development for treating diabetes mellitus.

12. N-TERT-BUTYLISOQUINE (GSK369786) - Yet another malaria drug in development, but only in its first phase of testing.

13. R 82913 - A compound in development for the treatment of HIV in phase 1 trials. Several HIV drugs have shown promise for treating COVID-19, but failed in trials

14. VBY-825 - Scientists are working on the compound for the treatment. It's in phase 0 testing for that purpose, but seemed to block coronavirus from entering cells.

15. 8-(3-CHLORROSTYRYL)CAFFEINE - Another antipsychotic, the drug is still in lab tests and has not begun clinical trials.

16. AMG-2674 - Scientists are still working on the compound in the lab, but believe it could be an alternative pain treatment to drugs like NSAIDS or opioids

17. KW 8232 - Like ONO 5334, the compound is being investigated to treat osteoporosis, but is in earlier stages of development.

18. MDL 28170 - Scientists hope this molecule may treat Alzheimer's disease based on lab testing, but it also appears to prevent coronavirus from invading cells.

19. SB-616234-A - It's unclear how the drug might work against coronavirus, but it's still in preclinical development for mood disorders.

20. SL-11128 - This compound shows anticancer qualities in the lab, but hasn't entered clinical trials.

21. Z LVG CHN2 - Although it is being designed for treating bacterial infections, the preclinical drug also seemed to block coronavirus from entering cells.

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Heliobas Disciple

Has No Life - Lives on TB
(fair use applies)

Florida reports its highest single-day spike in deaths while infections in Texas surpass grim 400,000 milestone - despite a plateau in cases across the rest of the country

Emily Crane
Published: 17:38 EDT, 28 July 2020 | Updated: 23:50 EDT, 28 July 2020

  • The death toll in Florida increased by 186 on Monday, bringing the total number of deaths in the third-most populous US state to 6,117, according the state's health department
  • Texas, the second-most populous state, added more than 6,000 new cases on Monday, pushing its total to 401,477
  • Only three other states - California, Florida and New York - have more than 400,000 total cases
  • The surges came as new COVID-19 cases across the US have started to decline for the first time in five weeks and the average daily toll of 66,000 infections is now the lowest it has been in 10 days
  • Infections have been surging since early June when COVID-19 started spreading rapidly throughout the Sunbelt states and the US recorded single daily highs of more than 77,000 infections
  • The downward trend in cases is prominent in the hotspot states of Florida, Texas, Arizona and California where governors and local officials rolled back reopenings to curb the infection rate
  • But even as cases start to plateau in those hard-hit states, 22 other states are currently seeing an increase in new infections
Florida has reported its highest single day spike for COVID-19 deaths and the number of infections in fellow hotspot state Texas has now surpassed 400,000, prompting fears the United States has lost control of the outbreak despite a plateau in cases across the country.

The death toll in Florida increased by 186 on Monday, bringing the total number of deaths in the third-most populous US state to 6,117, according the state's health department.

It is the the highest single-day spike since the start of the coronavirus pandemic.

Texas, the second-most populous state, added more than 6,000 new cases on Monday, pushing its total to 401,477.

Only three other states - California, Florida and New York - have more than 400,000 total cases.

The widening outbreak has pushed the US death toll from COVID-19 closer to the 150,000 mark. The national death toll rose to 148,298 on Monday, with more than 4.3 million confirmed cases.

The surge in cases in Florida prompted President Donald Trump last week to cancel his Republican Party's nominating convention events in Jacksonville in late August.

Major League Baseball has also postponed some games in its truncated delayed season after a number of Miami Marlins members tested positive for the virus.

There is, however, a glimmer of hope in the data from Texas, where the state health department reported that current hospitalizations due to COVID-19 fell on Monday.

The surges came as new COVID-19 cases across the US have started to decline for the first time in five weeks and the average daily toll of 66,000 infections is now the lowest it has been in 10 days.

Infections have been surging since early June when COVID-19 started spreading rapidly throughout the Sunbelt states and the US recorded single daily highs of more than 77,000 infections.

The US is now showing early signs that surging case numbers may be leveling out with week-over-week tallies showing infections have dropped two percent for the first time after rising steadily for five weeks.

The seven-day average for daily infections this week is now just under 66,000.

The downward trend in cases is prominent in the hotspot states of Florida, Texas, Arizona and California where governors and local officials rolled back reopenings to curb the infection rate. But even as cases start to plateau in those hard-hit states, 22 other states are currently seeing an increase in new infections.

Twenty states are seeing steady case numbers and eight states saw decreases in the number of infections in the last week.

Cases are mostly rising in the Midwest, which public health officials say is a sign the virus is spreading north from the Sunbelt states.

Infections also surged this week in some Northeastern states, like New Jersey, where infections fell after peaking in April.

The states that saw the highest increases compared to the previous week are Hawaii (87.6%), New Jersey (67%), Alaska (64%), Mississippi (52%), Connecticut (45.7%), Nebraska (44%) and Missouri (38.7%).

Meanwhile, deaths across the US have risen for the third straight week with 15 states reporting weekly increases in fatalities for at least two consecutive weeks, according to a Reuters tally of state and county reports.

In Texas, more than 1,000 people died in the last seven days, or 20 percent of the state's more than 5,000 total deaths.

Deaths increased in the last week in Georgia (89%), Missouri (85%), Kansas (80%), South Carolina (73%), Louisiana (73%), New Mexico (65%) and Nevada (61%).

Even those deaths are rising across the US, they remain well below levels seen in April when an average of 2,000 people a day were dying from the virus.

Health experts have indicated the death toll may not be as bad this time around possibly because a large share of the current cases are younger people, who are less likely to die, and because of advances in treatment and knowledge of the virus.

Deaths are a lagging indicator and can continue to rise weeks after new infections drop. A coronavirus death, when it occurs, typically comes several weeks after a person is first infected.

Dr Deborah Birx, the head of the White House COVID-19 taskforce, has continued to urge states with rising infections to close bars, cut back on indoor dining and to mandate face masks in order to stop the spread of the virus.

She said the surge in cases that has plagued Sunbelt states since Memorial Day is now being seen elsewhere, which is a sign that the virus is now spreading North.

The states with rising cases should be closing bars, cutting back on indoor restaurant capacity and limiting social gatherings to 10 people, Dr Birx warned.

She also said all Americans should be wearing masks when out in public or around other people.

'We can see what is happening in the South moving North,' Dr Birx said. 'We do believe there are states that do need to close their bars.'

Dr Anthony Fauci, a fellow task force member, said there were signs the recent surge could be peaking in hard-hit states like Florida and Texas while other parts of the country may be on the cusp of growing outbreaks.

'They may be cresting and coming back down,' Fauci, head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, told ABC's Good Morning America regarding the state of the outbreak in several Sunbelt states.

Fauci said there was a 'very early indication' that the percentage of coronavirus tests that were positive was starting to rise in other states, such as Ohio, Indiana, Tennessee and Kentucky.

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Heliobas Disciple

Has No Life - Lives on TB
(fair use applies)

DeSantis considering nursing home visits as Florida death toll rises
by: The Associated Press
Posted: Jul 28, 2020 / 07:41 PM EDT / Updated: Jul 28, 2020 / 07:48 PM EDT

Gov. Ron DeSantis is thinking of relaxing his assisted living facility visitation ban even as Florida’s death count from the coronavirus has spiked to a new height with 191 reported fatalities.

DeSantis made his comments after a discussion with doctors at an Orlando hospital on Tuesday. He said there are rapid tests that can ensure visitors are not infected with the virus and loneliness is one of the costs of the virus.

“It’ll be a 15 minute test. If you have the ability to do that, then I think that we need to start to talk about visitation again,” DeSantis said. “I really, really worry about the toll that the isolation has had on people in long-term care facilities.”

The total number of coronavirus deaths in Florida more than 6,100, according to the latest report from the health department’s website.

Data shows Florida reported an additional 9,230 lab-confirmed COVID-19 cases on Tuesday, bringing the total number of cases to 441,977.

Statistics show the number of patients treated in hospitals statewide for the coronavirus was steady over the past 24 hours at just over 9,000. That’s down from about 9,500 a week ago.

Florida has banned nursing home visits since mid-March, and barred the return of patients testing positive for the virus to nursing homes that lack an isolation ward.

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Heliobas Disciple

Has No Life - Lives on TB
(fair use applies)

Central Florida high school graduation may have been source of coronavirus exposure
July 28 2020

Graduating seniors of a Central Florida high school have been asked to quarantine because they may have been exposed to coronavirus during their commencement ceremony.


Officials said seniors from Bayside High School in Palm Bay may have been exposed to COVID-19.

The commencement ceremony was held on Saturday.

The district sent out a letter to families on Monday letting them know about the potential exposure.

"An individual who attended the Bayside High School graduation ceremony tested positive shortly after attending. The Florida Department of Health was notified about the positive case by Brevard Public Schools and we confirmed the positive result in our lab reporting system," a letter from the health department said.

Those who were at the graduation have been asked to quarantine for 14 days.

Further details were not immediately available.

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Heliobas Disciple

Has No Life - Lives on TB
(fair use applies)

Data shows COVID-19 cases continue to rise in Florida children
Carolyn Cerda
Tuesday, July 28th 2020

The Florida Department of Health's latest data from July 24 shows more than 31,000 children under the age of 18 have tested positive for coronavirus.

On July 16, the state had a little more than 23,000. That makes about 8,000 more cases of kids with COVID-19 in the past week - or a 34% increase in new cases among children in eight days.

And more children in Florida are requiring hospitalization.

During that same time frame, the amount of children being hospitalized with coronavirus increased from 246 kids to 303. That's a 23 percent increase in eight days.

But Northwest Florida health leaders say we're not seeing that same surge in the panhandle.

The Florida Department of Health in Escambia County reports, as of July 28, there have been 389 hospitalizations of children in the county.

Locally, there have not been any cases of the severe and rare multi-inflammatory syndrome associated with COVID-19 in children. The state has had a total of 15 cases -- most in Dade County.

The death toll among children in Florida now stands at five.

The test positivity rate among children has gone up, too, from 13.4% to 14.4% between July 16 and 24, according to the state health department.

Escambia County's positivity rate among children currently stand at 10.5%.

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Heliobas Disciple

Has No Life - Lives on TB
(fair use applies)

Georgia Governor, Atlanta Mayor Make Headway in Fight Over Coronavirus Restrictions, Mask Mandate
Gov. Brian Kemp withdraws request for emergency court hearing as mediation continues

By Sabrina Siddiqui
Updated July 28, 2020 3:49 pm ET

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp withdrew a request for an emergency court hearing in his lawsuit against Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms over the city’s mask mandate and other coronavirus restrictions.

The cancellation of the hearing, which was to take place Tuesday, marked a potential thaw in virus-related negotiations between Mr. Kemp and Ms. Bottoms, after a Georgia judge ordered them into mediation last week.

In a statement Monday, a spokesman for Mr. Kemp said the governor was standing down from the hearing “to continue productive, good faith negotiations with city officials.” Mr. Kemp’s office said he wasn’t withdrawing the underlying lawsuit and signaled their attorneys were preparing for a future hearing if necessary.

Mr. Kemp, a Republican, filed the lawsuit against the Democratic mayor earlier this month after she issued a requirement that people wear face coverings in public and rolled back plans to reopen the city amid a wave of new coronavirus cases in Georgia.

Signs of a potential settlement first emerged last week after Ms. Bottoms told reporters she was engaged in discussions with Mr. Kemp over how to iron out their differences.

Ms. Bottoms said reopening guidance she reinstated urging restaurants and retailers to revert to phase 1 was voluntary. Under those guidelines, businesses are encouraged to operate with to-go options and curbside pickup.

In its statement about the hearing, Mr. Kemp’s office said that Ms. Bottoms’s comments around reopening guidelines were a concession and that those restrictions were the primary reason behind the litigation. Ms. Bottoms has said the rollback to Phase 1 was always voluntary.

The lawsuit claimed that Ms. Bottoms lacks the authority to enforce mandates that are “more or less restrictive” than those issued by the governor. Mr. Kemp, who has urged the public to take voluntary steps to curb the spread of the virus, also signed an executive order this month banning cities and counties from requiring that masks be worn in public.

“While we all agree that wearing a mask is effective, I’m confident that Georgians don’t need a mandate to do the right thing,” Mr. Kemp said at a news conference this month.

Ms. Bottoms has said the governor’s lawsuit was driven by personal retaliation. She decried it as a waste of resources and accused Mr. Kemp of responding to the pandemic “in a reckless manner.”

Tensions have also flared between the two leaders over a wave of protests in Atlanta against police brutality and an increase in violence. On Friday, Mr. Kemp renewed an emergency order that deployed as many as 1,000 National Guard troops to Atlanta. Ms. Bottoms has criticized the move as unnecessary.

In a court filing on Monday, lawyers for Ms. Bottoms said Mr. Kemp’s legal challenge is prohibited under sovereign immunity, a legal doctrine barring lawsuits against government officials. Briefs were also filed by Georgia’s House and Senate Democratic caucuses and several labor unions opposing Mr. Kemp’s lawsuit.

The case could carry implications for several cities and municipalities across the state with similar mask mandates in place.

Georgia was one of the first states to reopen amid the pandemic, drawing a rebuke from President Trump and public-health officials. The state has experienced a recent surge of new infections, bringing its total to more than 170,000 confirmed cases and more than 3,500 deaths, according to the Georgia Department of Public Health.

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Heliobas Disciple

Has No Life - Lives on TB
(fair use applies)

CDC: One-third of COVID-19 patients who aren't hospitalized have long-term illness
One patient whose symptoms have lingered for months called the report "monumental."

By Erika Edwards
July 24, 2020, 1:39 PM EDT

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention acknowledged Friday that a significant number of COVID-19 patients do not recover quickly, and instead experience ongoing symptoms, such as fatigue and cough.

As many as a third of patients who were never sick enough to be hospitalized are not back to their usual health up to three weeks after their diagnosis, the report found.

"COVID-19 can result in prolonged illness even among persons with milder outpatient illness, including young adults," the report's authors wrote.

The acknowledgement is welcome news to patients who call themselves "long-haulers" — suffering from debilitating symptoms weeks and even months after their initial infection.

"This report is monumental for all of us who have been struggling with fear of the unknown, lack of recognition and many times, a lack of belief and proper care from medical professionals during our prolonged recovery from COVID-19," Kate Porter, who is on day 129 of her recovery, wrote in an email to NBC News.

Porter, 35, of Beverly, Massachusetts, has had low-grade fevers, fatigue, rapid heart beat, shortness of breath and memory and sleep issues since her diagnosis March 17.

"This gives me hope that we will gain access to more resources throughout our recovery and hopefully, get our lives back to what they once were," Porter wrote.

The CDC report is based on telephone surveys of 274 COVID-19 patients. Ninety-five of those patients, or 35 percent, said they "had not returned to their usual state of health" when they were surveyed, which was at least two to three weeks after their first test.

Many with long-term symptoms are otherwise young and healthy: Among those surveyed between ages 18 and 34, about 20 percent experienced lasting symptoms.

"This report indicates that even among symptomatic adults tested in outpatient settings, it might take weeks for resolution of symptoms and return to usual health," the CDC authors wrote.

The report also pointed out that in contrast, "over 90 percent of outpatients with influenza recover within approximately two weeks" after a positive flu test.

Among the patients who experienced lasting symptoms in the CDC report, 71 percent reported fatigue, 61 percent had lasting cough, and 61 percent reported ongoing headaches.

The CDC added that preventative measures, such as physical distancing, face masks and frequent hand-washing, continue to be important to slow the spread of COVID-19.

.
 

Heliobas Disciple

Has No Life - Lives on TB
(fair use applies)

These women's coronavirus symptoms never went away. Their doctors' willingness to help did.
“‘Gaslighting’ is the word I’ve been using repeatedly,” said one COVID-19 survivor. “I’m so ill and some people are telling me this is a figment of my imagination."

By Elizabeth Chuck
July 28, 2020, 3:19 PM EDT

The frightening symptoms began in early March, when Ailsa Court of Portland, Oregon, suspects she caught the coronavirus from someone at work. More than four months later, she still has shortness of breath, achiness in her lungs, and a strange tingling in her calves.

But doctors have downplayed Court’s concerns as her health problems have dragged on. At one point, her primary care doctor suggested that perhaps she was just “stressed because of the economy,” she said.

And during a visit to an urgent care center in May — when she feared she might be having a stroke or other neurological problem because she was having memory loss and a crippling migraine, in addition to chest tightness and numbness in her legs — a physician rolled his eyes at her, Court, 35, said. Her issues were nothing more than acid reflux, he told her in a dismissive tone, plus maybe a vitamin deficiency.

The doctor’s diagnosis infuriated Court, a commercial makeup artist, who felt a male patient who went to urgent care with the same set of health concerns would have been taken more seriously.

“‘Gaslighting’ is the word I’ve been using repeatedly,” she said, referring to the psychological tactic of making a person second-guess whether something they know to be true is real. “I’m so ill and some people are telling me this is a figment of my imagination. It truly feels like a nightmare.”

Court is not alone. Across the country, many coronavirus survivors with long-lasting symptoms, particularly women, are dealing with dual frustrations: debilitating health conditions that won’t go away, and doctors who tell them the issue might be all in their heads.

Despite their oath to do no harm, medical professionals’ judgment can be inadvertently altered by deeply ingrained unconscious biases, experts say, and the “hysterical female” patient has long been a dangerous stereotype in medicine.

While there are no studies on how female coronavirus patients are treated compared to male ones, past research reveals a disturbing pattern. Women who are in pain are more likely than men to receive sedatives instead of pain medication; women with the same type of pain as men who go to an emergency department have to wait longer to be seen; and women are up to three times more likely to die after a heart attack than men as a result of unequal care.

In addition to gender, race and ethnicity are major contributors in the type of medical care people receive: Data show that Black patients in acute pain are 40 percent less likely than white patients to receive medication, and Latino patients are 25 percent less likely than white patients.

And while income, education and other socioeconomic factors explain some differences in health outcomes for minorities, experts believe those alone don’t account for all disparities — including the significantly higher rate of maternal mortality among Black women in the United States. They point to implicit biases on the part of health care providers as one explanation.

Dismissed as a ‘mental issue’ or anxiety

Alisa Valdés, 51, an Albuquerque, New Mexico, novelist who, along with her 19-year-old son, Alexander, has been sick since mid-March, has been told by doctors that her problems were a “mental issue,” despite very real physical complications of her illness, including emergency surgery to remove her gallbladder. The doctors, she says, have been “minimizing me as a woman, minimizing me as a Latina.”

“Nobody is going to come right out and say that they’re discriminating against you for those reasons,” she said. “So what do I have to go by? Intuition, instinct, past experience. The attitude of certain providers. The way they look at you. The way they don’t look at you. The way they shrug you off.”

Valdés’ symptoms have included extreme burning in her digestive tract, unbearable pain in her sternum and upper back, and a loss of appetite. She feels doctors’ biases have influenced the way they treat her son, too: When she took him into the emergency room two months ago because his heart was racing, she said she was stunned when doctors automatically assumed his heart rate must be elevated because he was on drugs, which he has never taken.

Other coronavirus survivors say it is hard to parse out whether their gender or race factored into the response they got from doctors. All they know is they have had their symptoms written off.

Adrienne Crenshaw, 38, of Houston, who is Black, says she has not witnessed explicit racism or sexism during the multiple trips to the emergency room that she has made since she got the coronavirus in mid-June. She has had shooting pains around her heart, skyrocketing blood pressure and tingling in her arms and legs, and has gone to the hospital several times worried she might be having a heart attack.

Doctors have prescribed anti-anxiety medications to Crenshaw, a bartender and former fitness competitor, despite her insistence that her symptoms are not a result of anxiety. Her father died of the coronavirus July 10 — but she has learned not to mention that to her medical providers, since it usually prompts them to suggest her problems are a manifestation of grief and stress.

On one trip earlier this month, she overheard a doctor talking about her to his team with disdain, but she didn’t know why.

“He said, ‘The girl’s perfectly normal, there’s nothing wrong with her,’” she said. “And in my head, I’m like, ‘I’m not perfectly fine. I don’t just go in the ER to take a room up.’”

An effort to help coronavirus ‘long-haulers’

The medical community as a whole has not ignored these so-called coronavirus long-haulers. Health care providers throughout the United States have been working to figure out why they are not getting better, and a handful of post-COVID clinics have sprung up across the country for patients who are having neurological and physical difficulties months after they first got sick.

And in recent weeks, to the relief of long-haulers, top public health officials have recognized that COVID-19 symptoms can last for lengthy periods of time. On Friday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention acknowledged in a report that as many as a third of individuals who were never sick enough to be hospitalized are not entirely better up to three weeks after their diagnosis. Meanwhile, Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s top infectious diseases doctor, has said more research is needed on individuals who appear to be suffering from a post-viral syndrome.

Experts say there are many reasons why doctors do not have solutions for patients experiencing prolonged complications from the coronavirus, starting with the obvious: The virus has not been seen before, and they are learning about it in real time.

Dr. Jessica Dine, director of the advanced consultative pulmonary section at Penn Medicine and a pulmonologist who has been treating patients whose symptoms have not let up, said even if a clinician has not seen a set of symptoms associated with the coronavirus before, there are ways to show patients they are still being heard.

“The first step is to recognize that these symptoms are real,” said Dine, who along with her colleagues, has seen patients with ongoing respiratory issues, as well as many of the problems cited by the women interviewed in this story: tingling and numbness in their hands and feet, heart rate and blood pressure fluctuations, and extreme fatigue and dizziness.

“The frustrating part for the patient and the clinician is, we don’t know if this is going to get better and when,” she said.

Carrianne Ekberg, 37, a social media consultant in Gig Harbor, Washington, said she has not received that kind of sensitivity from her health care providers. She tested positive for the coronavirus April 1 and still has times when the shortness of breath and back pain she experienced when she first tested positive return. She also still has days where she is so fatigued, she can’t get out of bed. But doctors have said there is nothing they can do for her and have suggested perhaps she caught another virus on top of the coronavirus or is suffering from anxiety.

“I know they’re probably under a lot of stress and seeing a lot of patients, but it’s so easy to just write, ‘You’re probably going to be okay, this seems to be normal, don’t worry about it, let’s talk again in a few months, keep me posted,’” she said. “That is the type of response I think COVID survivors want to hear, not ‘you have another virus’ or ‘you need to seek mental health help because you’re probably crazy.’”

Avoiding implicit bias

To combat unconscious biases that can affect treatment, clinicians typically are given protocols to follow — checklists to run through to make sure they don’t miss a diagnosis, said Dr. Melissa Simon, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology and the director of the Center for Health Equity Transformation at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. When someone goes into the emergency room with chest pains, for example, there is an exhaustive list of laboratory tests that need to be ordered and vital signs that need to be checked to run through possible diagnoses.

With the coronavirus, and the problems it is causing long term, there is not yet a protocol to follow, Simon said.

“We are constructing that list and that differential as we are literally flying the airplane,” she said.

Still, it is within a patient’s rights to ask a doctor why they arrived at the conclusion they did, or to inquire what other diagnoses were ruled out, she added.

Simon said it did not surprise her that women with long-term coronavirus symptoms were having a hard time getting doctors to believe them.

“There are long-standing biases that are omnipresent,” she said.

And while it’s hard when a coronavirus patient is already stressed from being sick, “we have to acknowledge that what the patient is telling us is real, and we have to seek to understand how best to address it,” she said.

Court, the Oregon makeup artist, has been hesitant to contact doctors again after they dismissed so many of her symptoms. Her situation has been compounded by the fact that she never got a positive COVID-19 test: When she first got sick in March, several days after close contact with a woman at work who was sneezing and coughing and had just returned from Italy, then a coronavirus hot spot, her doctor repeatedly refused to give her a test, saying the state did not have the testing capacity. By the time Court arranged to pay for one out of pocket from a private company one month later, the result was negative; she is still certain that she, as well as her husband and two kids, had the coronavirus nonetheless.

The rest of Court’s family has since recovered, but she lives in a state of unknown with her health. Some days, she loses her breath doing household activities, or gets a fever that tops 100 F; on other days, she feels OK. This makes it difficult for her to commit to work. A runner, she is no longer training for a half-marathon like she was before she got sick, and now finds herself panting even from a walk in the woods with her family.

But what has been most frustrating to her is that doctors have doubted her so many times that she has started to doubt herself. Her husband, a former Army combat medic, has been a reality check, reminding her how severe her symptoms are and how many nights she has feared she will die in her sleep.

“I have to remind myself I’m not making this up,” Court said.

She feels the political debates across the U.S. over the coronavirus are making it even harder for patients to be believed.

“Everybody is in this state of questioning reality,” she said. “From the get-go, this country has been gaslit about COVID, and now on an individual level, patients are being gaslit.”

.
 

Heliobas Disciple

Has No Life - Lives on TB
I tell you, it's getting pretty ugly out there- so many krazy Karens out there that I'm now as likely to cross the street to avoid old white gals as I am young folk :: shake head :: who's winding these witches up? Madcow? CNN? Facebook group think groups? The source is toxic mold, and need be eliminated with extreme prejudice.

Karlyn Borysenko - on Parler/Minds/Gab @Karlyn @DrKarlynB
11m

Today on @glennbeck's show, I talked about how the masks are dehumanizing people. Case in point: Grown woman wishes death upon two young children because they aren't wearing masks and seems to think this is completely normal.
View: https://twitter.com/DrKarlynB/status/1288270774747443202?s=20
The woman is obviously over stressed and completely out of line. But I also can't stand these peeping-Tom videos made by strangers trying to 'out' people's behavior. They are ALL Karens - the ones screaming and the ones recording and posting it to shame them. Everyone should just mind their own business. Stop recording strangers and posting it, stop yelling at strangers. They're all unhinged, they're all destroying the fabric of our society.

But a thought came to me today after a discussion with a younger friend who thinks this is an old person's disease and if you are at risk, stay home and let everyone else get on with it. This seems like an appropriate place place to post it.

First, to get it out of the way - it's not an old person's disease. Anyone can get it, any age can get a serious case of it.

But - here's my what-if for consideration.

If COVID were a young person's disease. Or is a new virus is unleashed upon the world from some other lab - but the difference is it effects young people only - and in this hypothetical - anyone over the age of 50 will not get sick from the virus. They can catch it and spread it, but they don't even know when they have it, they are asymptomatic carriers. On the other hand, the younger you are, the more deadly it is. Kids everywhere are dying. They are closing schools left and right because of the clusters they are having. The funeral homes are full, the hospitals are full. And the medical community asks everyone to wear masks to stop the spread and save the children who were dying.

In that scenario - how many older people would refuse to wear a mask? How many would say - "this is a problem for kids, I'm not a kid, I hate that piece of cloth on my face, and you are coming after my liberties and civil rights. If this is effecting kids, keep your kids home and leave me to my freedom. Oh, and btw grieving parent - it's all a hoax and you are just a sheeple and buying into fear to control you. I don't believe kids are dying, the tests are fake, the reports are fake."?

And in that scenario - how many young women (and men) who are parents of young kids would yell at the old people they came upon in the stores who refused to wear a mask? And when the videos were posted of the young people yelling at the old people, don't you think it would be the ones yelling at the selfish old ladies refusing to mask up who would be the "good guys", and the ones without the mask who would be shamed by the social media world?

(btw, in that scenario, I believe ALL the old people would mask for the young people. That's how we're wired. I don't think you'd find one boomer or silent generation refusing to put a mask on to save the children.)

~~~~~~

Just some food for thought.


HD
 
Last edited:

Melodi

Disaster Cat
(fair use applies)

These women's coronavirus symptoms never went away. Their doctors' willingness to help did.
“‘Gaslighting’ is the word I’ve been using repeatedly,” said one COVID-19 survivor. “I’m so ill and some people are telling me this is a figment of my imagination."

By Elizabeth Chuck
July 28, 2020, 3:19 PM EDT

The frightening symptoms began in early March, when Ailsa Court of Portland, Oregon, suspects she caught the coronavirus from someone at work. More than four months later, she still has shortness of breath, achiness in her lungs, and a strange tingling in her calves.

But doctors have downplayed Court’s concerns as her health problems have dragged on. At one point, her primary care doctor suggested that perhaps she was just “stressed because of the economy,” she said.

And during a visit to an urgent care center in May — when she feared she might be having a stroke or other neurological problem because she was having memory loss and a crippling migraine, in addition to chest tightness and numbness in her legs — a physician rolled his eyes at her, Court, 35, said. Her issues were nothing more than acid reflux, he told her in a dismissive tone, plus maybe a vitamin deficiency.

The doctor’s diagnosis infuriated Court, a commercial makeup artist, who felt a male patient who went to urgent care with the same set of health concerns would have been taken more seriously.

“‘Gaslighting’ is the word I’ve been using repeatedly,” she said, referring to the psychological tactic of making a person second-guess whether something they know to be true is real. “I’m so ill and some people are telling me this is a figment of my imagination. It truly feels like a nightmare.”

Court is not alone. Across the country, many coronavirus survivors with long-lasting symptoms, particularly women, are dealing with dual frustrations: debilitating health conditions that won’t go away, and doctors who tell them the issue might be all in their heads.

Despite their oath to do no harm, medical professionals’ judgment can be inadvertently altered by deeply ingrained unconscious biases, experts say, and the “hysterical female” patient has long been a dangerous stereotype in medicine.

While there are no studies on how female coronavirus patients are treated compared to male ones, past research reveals a disturbing pattern. Women who are in pain are more likely than men to receive sedatives instead of pain medication; women with the same type of pain as men who go to an emergency department have to wait longer to be seen; and women are up to three times more likely to die after a heart attack than men as a result of unequal care.

In addition to gender, race and ethnicity are major contributors in the type of medical care people receive: Data show that Black patients in acute pain are 40 percent less likely than white patients to receive medication, and Latino patients are 25 percent less likely than white patients.

And while income, education and other socioeconomic factors explain some differences in health outcomes for minorities, experts believe those alone don’t account for all disparities — including the significantly higher rate of maternal mortality among Black women in the United States. They point to implicit biases on the part of health care providers as one explanation.

Dismissed as a ‘mental issue’ or anxiety

Alisa Valdés, 51, an Albuquerque, New Mexico, novelist who, along with her 19-year-old son, Alexander, has been sick since mid-March, has been told by doctors that her problems were a “mental issue,” despite very real physical complications of her illness, including emergency surgery to remove her gallbladder. The doctors, she says, have been “minimizing me as a woman, minimizing me as a Latina.”

“Nobody is going to come right out and say that they’re discriminating against you for those reasons,” she said. “So what do I have to go by? Intuition, instinct, past experience. The attitude of certain providers. The way they look at you. The way they don’t look at you. The way they shrug you off.”

Valdés’ symptoms have included extreme burning in her digestive tract, unbearable pain in her sternum and upper back, and a loss of appetite. She feels doctors’ biases have influenced the way they treat her son, too: When she took him into the emergency room two months ago because his heart was racing, she said she was stunned when doctors automatically assumed his heart rate must be elevated because he was on drugs, which he has never taken.

Other coronavirus survivors say it is hard to parse out whether their gender or race factored into the response they got from doctors. All they know is they have had their symptoms written off.

Adrienne Crenshaw, 38, of Houston, who is Black, says she has not witnessed explicit racism or sexism during the multiple trips to the emergency room that she has made since she got the coronavirus in mid-June. She has had shooting pains around her heart, skyrocketing blood pressure and tingling in her arms and legs, and has gone to the hospital several times worried she might be having a heart attack.

Doctors have prescribed anti-anxiety medications to Crenshaw, a bartender and former fitness competitor, despite her insistence that her symptoms are not a result of anxiety. Her father died of the coronavirus July 10 — but she has learned not to mention that to her medical providers, since it usually prompts them to suggest her problems are a manifestation of grief and stress.

On one trip earlier this month, she overheard a doctor talking about her to his team with disdain, but she didn’t know why.

“He said, ‘The girl’s perfectly normal, there’s nothing wrong with her,’” she said. “And in my head, I’m like, ‘I’m not perfectly fine. I don’t just go in the ER to take a room up.’”

An effort to help coronavirus ‘long-haulers’

The medical community as a whole has not ignored these so-called coronavirus long-haulers. Health care providers throughout the United States have been working to figure out why they are not getting better, and a handful of post-COVID clinics have sprung up across the country for patients who are having neurological and physical difficulties months after they first got sick.

And in recent weeks, to the relief of long-haulers, top public health officials have recognized that COVID-19 symptoms can last for lengthy periods of time. On Friday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention acknowledged in a report that as many as a third of individuals who were never sick enough to be hospitalized are not entirely better up to three weeks after their diagnosis. Meanwhile, Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s top infectious diseases doctor, has said more research is needed on individuals who appear to be suffering from a post-viral syndrome.

Experts say there are many reasons why doctors do not have solutions for patients experiencing prolonged complications from the coronavirus, starting with the obvious: The virus has not been seen before, and they are learning about it in real time.

Dr. Jessica Dine, director of the advanced consultative pulmonary section at Penn Medicine and a pulmonologist who has been treating patients whose symptoms have not let up, said even if a clinician has not seen a set of symptoms associated with the coronavirus before, there are ways to show patients they are still being heard.

“The first step is to recognize that these symptoms are real,” said Dine, who along with her colleagues, has seen patients with ongoing respiratory issues, as well as many of the problems cited by the women interviewed in this story: tingling and numbness in their hands and feet, heart rate and blood pressure fluctuations, and extreme fatigue and dizziness.

“The frustrating part for the patient and the clinician is, we don’t know if this is going to get better and when,” she said.

Carrianne Ekberg, 37, a social media consultant in Gig Harbor, Washington, said she has not received that kind of sensitivity from her health care providers. She tested positive for the coronavirus April 1 and still has times when the shortness of breath and back pain she experienced when she first tested positive return. She also still has days where she is so fatigued, she can’t get out of bed. But doctors have said there is nothing they can do for her and have suggested perhaps she caught another virus on top of the coronavirus or is suffering from anxiety.

“I know they’re probably under a lot of stress and seeing a lot of patients, but it’s so easy to just write, ‘You’re probably going to be okay, this seems to be normal, don’t worry about it, let’s talk again in a few months, keep me posted,’” she said. “That is the type of response I think COVID survivors want to hear, not ‘you have another virus’ or ‘you need to seek mental health help because you’re probably crazy.’”

Avoiding implicit bias

To combat unconscious biases that can affect treatment, clinicians typically are given protocols to follow — checklists to run through to make sure they don’t miss a diagnosis, said Dr. Melissa Simon, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology and the director of the Center for Health Equity Transformation at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. When someone goes into the emergency room with chest pains, for example, there is an exhaustive list of laboratory tests that need to be ordered and vital signs that need to be checked to run through possible diagnoses.

With the coronavirus, and the problems it is causing long term, there is not yet a protocol to follow, Simon said.

“We are constructing that list and that differential as we are literally flying the airplane,” she said.

Still, it is within a patient’s rights to ask a doctor why they arrived at the conclusion they did, or to inquire what other diagnoses were ruled out, she added.

Simon said it did not surprise her that women with long-term coronavirus symptoms were having a hard time getting doctors to believe them.

“There are long-standing biases that are omnipresent,” she said.

And while it’s hard when a coronavirus patient is already stressed from being sick, “we have to acknowledge that what the patient is telling us is real, and we have to seek to understand how best to address it,” she said.

Court, the Oregon makeup artist, has been hesitant to contact doctors again after they dismissed so many of her symptoms. Her situation has been compounded by the fact that she never got a positive COVID-19 test: When she first got sick in March, several days after close contact with a woman at work who was sneezing and coughing and had just returned from Italy, then a coronavirus hot spot, her doctor repeatedly refused to give her a test, saying the state did not have the testing capacity. By the time Court arranged to pay for one out of pocket from a private company one month later, the result was negative; she is still certain that she, as well as her husband and two kids, had the coronavirus nonetheless.

The rest of Court’s family has since recovered, but she lives in a state of unknown with her health. Some days, she loses her breath doing household activities, or gets a fever that tops 100 F; on other days, she feels OK. This makes it difficult for her to commit to work. A runner, she is no longer training for a half-marathon like she was before she got sick, and now finds herself panting even from a walk in the woods with her family.

But what has been most frustrating to her is that doctors have doubted her so many times that she has started to doubt herself. Her husband, a former Army combat medic, has been a reality check, reminding her how severe her symptoms are and how many nights she has feared she will die in her sleep.

“I have to remind myself I’m not making this up,” Court said.

She feels the political debates across the U.S. over the coronavirus are making it even harder for patients to be believed.

“Everybody is in this state of questioning reality,” she said. “From the get-go, this country has been gaslit about COVID, and now on an individual level, patients are being gaslit.”

.
This one really hits home and I have no doubt it is true, I had a different issue - for 30 years my extreme (to the point of codeine not always working - when I could get it) "women's problems" resulted in my simply not talking to doctors about it after years of: "are you under stress at work," or "that sort of pain you are describing is really a bit excessive you know," and "do you have an issue about being a woman?" and the every popular "if you just lost weight"....

Thankfully I was in the hospital with something else when the hemorrhaging started, the surgeon who took out "the works" told me that "I have never seen such a bad case of XYZ in 30 years or practice, especially one that was not staged 4 cancer!"

I told my Mother, horrifying as the whole experience was - I felt SO VINDICATED! All those years of what I can only call medical abuse because it was "only women's problems" and "you just don't want to go to work do you?" when in reality that entire part of my body was growing masses of stuff that shouldn't be there and until very recent times would simply have killed me horribly in my early 40s.

These women with what I suspect is eventually going to be called something like Post-COVID syndrome are the tip of the iceberg and ARE being pushed off because while recent medical school graduates are taught to NOT DO THIS (and many of them are women) doctors over 40 were usually "taught" or "encouraged to believe" the opposite - that when men say they are sick, they are sick; with women its probably "nothing," especially if you can't see immediately what is wrong.

Women are more likely to REPORT early symptoms than men, which is why it is important to listen to them them now - a lot of men will wait for the post-COVID heart attack.
 

PanBear

Veteran Member
Doctors Transcript found here
America’s Frontline Doctors SCOTUS Press Conference Transcript



Thanks to beDplorable for finding the video

Sergeant Major
Second Opionion Project on Covid19 – America's Frontline Doctors
video 49 minutes – July 28, 2020
 

PanBear

Veteran Member
CBS Evening News
Trump under fire for promoting false COVID-19 claims on Twitter
Twitter, Facebook and YouTube accused President Trump and his son, Donald Trump Jr., of peddling false information about the virus. Twitter is temporarily suspending Don Jr.'s account for sharing a video promoting hydroxychloroquine as a potential treatment for the coronavirus. Ben Tracy reports.

video 2 min - July 28, 2020
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=68BqCqlN3j8


:o
 

naturallysweet

Has No Life - Lives on TB
My last 2 medical providers were like evil twin and good twin. 2 women and both about the same age.
The first complained about having to wear a a mask and demanded that I accept allergies as the only explanation. She got mad and spoke in anger when I tried to ask about my low blood pressure spells. I swear the virus deniers are trying to kill people

The second had the mask and shield, because I was still fully symptomatic, right down to taste and smell being gone. She listened intently and explained that covid was a long recovery for many. I'm not her only long haul patient
Thanks to her, I'm going to get a heart test at the local hospital. Because apparently 80/50 to 70/40 are not good numbers for BP, and I feel really really bad when it happens. Last one was last night. Still feel like crap now, but not as bad as last night and BP Is in the normal range again.
.
I was healthy pre covid. Now, I'm not. It's not an old person disease! But most won't take it seriously until they or their family member rolls the bad covid dice. I know at least one child in my community's, aged 10, has bee continually sick with it for months.

Most people who got polio didn't need the iron lung. But no one is stupid enough now to say that most survived, so no precautions should be taken. Or we have treatments, so we should just let it burn through.
 

TorahTips

Veteran Member
My last 2 medical providers were like evil twin and good twin. 2 women and both about the same age.
The first complained about having to wear a a mask and demanded that I accept allergies as the only explanation. She got mad and spoke in anger when I tried to ask about my low blood pressure spells. I swear the virus deniers are trying to kill people

The second had the mask and shield, because I was still fully symptomatic, right down to taste and smell being gone. She listened intently and explained that covid was a long recovery for many. I'm not her only long haul patient
Thanks to her, I'm going to get a heart test at the local hospital. Because apparently 80/50 to 70/40 are not good numbers for BP, and I feel really really bad when it happens. Last one was last night. Still feel like crap now, but not as bad as last night and BP Is in the normal range again.
.
I was healthy pre covid. Now, I'm not. It's not an old person disease! But most won't take it seriously until they or their family member rolls the bad covid dice. I know at least one child in my community's, aged 10, has bee continually sick with it for months.

Most people who got polio didn't need the iron lung. But no one is stupid enough now to say that most survived, so no precautions should be taken. Or we have treatments, so we should just let it burn through.
I keep having strange post CV19 things happening. Yesterday I just felt horrible. Sore throat, runny nose. Temperature was strange ranging from 99 all the way to 96 in a matter of minutes. Has this now caused thyroid issues?

We have no idea where this will end. None. They say now that 33% of all people have lasting and significant covid-like symptoms that come and go. Crazy. But remember it's the sniffles....
 

Mixin

Veteran Member
(fair use applies)

CDC: One-third of COVID-19 patients who aren't hospitalized have long-term illness
One patient whose symptoms have lingered for months called the report "monumental."

By Erika Edwards
July 24, 2020, 1:39 PM EDT

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention acknowledged Friday that a significant number of COVID-19 patients do not recover quickly, and instead experience ongoing symptoms, such as fatigue and cough.

As many as a third of patients who were never sick enough to be hospitalized are not back to their usual health up to three weeks after their diagnosis, the report found.

"COVID-19 can result in prolonged illness even among persons with milder outpatient illness, including young adults," the report's authors wrote.

The acknowledgement is welcome news to patients who call themselves "long-haulers" — suffering from debilitating symptoms weeks and even months after their initial infection.

"This report is monumental for all of us who have been struggling with fear of the unknown, lack of recognition and many times, a lack of belief and proper care from medical professionals during our prolonged recovery from COVID-19," Kate Porter, who is on day 129 of her recovery, wrote in an email to NBC News.

Porter, 35, of Beverly, Massachusetts, has had low-grade fevers, fatigue, rapid heart beat, shortness of breath and memory and sleep issues since her diagnosis March 17.

"This gives me hope that we will gain access to more resources throughout our recovery and hopefully, get our lives back to what they once were," Porter wrote.

The CDC report is based on telephone surveys of 274 COVID-19 patients. Ninety-five of those patients, or 35 percent, said they "had not returned to their usual state of health" when they were surveyed, which was at least two to three weeks after their first test.

Many with long-term symptoms are otherwise young and healthy: Among those surveyed between ages 18 and 34, about 20 percent experienced lasting symptoms.

"This report indicates that even among symptomatic adults tested in outpatient settings, it might take weeks for resolution of symptoms and return to usual health," the CDC authors wrote.

The report also pointed out that in contrast, "over 90 percent of outpatients with influenza recover within approximately two weeks" after a positive flu test.

Among the patients who experienced lasting symptoms in the CDC report, 71 percent reported fatigue, 61 percent had lasting cough, and 61 percent reported ongoing headaches.

The CDC added that preventative measures, such as physical distancing, face masks and frequent hand-washing, continue to be important to slow the spread of COVID-19.

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It must be terribly scary to have this new virus and no one has a clue as to how to treat lingering symptoms. I hope the medical community all get together and collaborate on successful treatments. I wonder if the ongoing headaches are the result of the coughing? Would an Albuterol inhaler help?
 

Zagdid

Veteran Member

COVID-19 infections jump 33% in just 10 days among Tennessee children
By: Phil Williams
Posted at 11:07 AM, Jul 29, 2020 and last updated 12:07 PM, Jul 29, 2020

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WTVF) — The number of school-age children across Tennessee who have tested positive for COVID-19 has shot up by a third in just the last 10 days, the latest data from the Tennessee Department of Health shows.
On July 18, there were 6,827 children ages 5-18 who had tested positive for the coronavirus, the data shows.
By July 28, that number had risen to 9,085.

"Now that we are starting to see data on children because kids are actually starting to get sick, we are seeing very much an increase in the rates of infection among children," Dr. Nick Cote, a Murfreesboro physician, told NewsChannel 5 Investigates.

Cote, who specializes in internal and family medicine, appeared Tuesday night before the Rutherford County Board of Education, to argue against in-person schooling when COVID transmission rates are so high.

The physician told NewsChannel 5 that "we are seeing critically ill children with COVID-19 throughout the country."
"Even if they are not getting critically ill, the problem is they are bringing that infection home to the adults in their lives," Cote added.

"And they are able to infect the teachers who are in the classroom and the substitute teachers and administrators and janitors and all the other folks who have to work in the classroom."

That uptick in coronavirus cases among children comes as Gov. Bill Lee pushes schools to reopen. At the same time, almost every Tennessee county is showing what his own health department considers to be unacceptable rates of transmission.
Studies have shown that young people face a lower risk of being sickened by COVID-19, although at least three Tennessee children have died. Kids ages 10 and older can spread the virus just as readily as adults.

According to the state data, Metro Nashville-Davidson County led Tennessee with 266 new cases among school-age children in the last 10 days, an increase of 20 percent for the county.

That was followed by Shelby County with 247 additional cases, up 18 percent.

In Rutherford County, where the school board voted to resume in-person learning, there were 151 new cases among school-age children, an increase of 35 percent in just 10 days.

Sumner County had 94 new cases in the last 10 days (up 39%), Williamson had 81 (up 30%), Wilson had 53 (up 37%), and Maury had 46 (up 61%).

Experts say such counts of the number of infected children likely represent a significant undercount since kids are not routinely tested.

Cote said he expects those numbers will increase dramatically when kids return to the classroom, along with the normal jump in influenza and other respiratory infections associated with start of a new school year.

He had argued that Rutherford County Schools should not re-open until after Labor Day to give teachers more time to train on a new virtual learning platform. Even then, Cote suggested school should be online only for the first nine weeks to give the county more time to reduce the current high rate of spread of the virus.

During the school board meeting, board member Lisa Moore -- who was not wearing a face covering despite a county mask mandate -- drew jeers from the audience when she read a letter that she said showed there are "many, many different opinions" in the medical community.

The letter, which Moore said represented "another interesting perspective," was from a chiropractor who opposes a mask mandate.

"Quoting a chiropractor for outdated medical information is just completely irresponsible," Cote said.

"I don’t know if it was done because that person just doesn’t know better or if it was done entirely intentionally. Either way, it’s inexcusable -- especially when there’s two board-certified physicians sitting in the audience who just told you that this is dangerous."

In just-published guidance for school administrators, the Centers for Disease Control recommended last week that schools consider the rate of transmission within the community when deciding whether to bring students and teachers back into the classroom.

Asked why he was not considering transmission rates in his push to reopen schools, the governor said his plans weighed the need for mitigation with "the risks associated with children not being in school."

In addition, the CDC recommends that every person who was in the same classroom with someone infected with COVID-19 should be tested and/or quarantined.

Lee's plan would only require quarantine if it could be determined that individuals had been within six feet for more than 10 minutes.

The governor said his team was not following the CDC recommendation because of the turnaround time for testing.
"That weighs into that decision," he added.
 

Zagdid

Veteran Member

Car ride with asymptomatic woman leads to 10 new infections, 2 hospitalizations, 3 business closures, Ohio governor says
by: FOX8 Digital Desk
Posted: Jul 29, 2020 / 12:11 PM EDT / Updated: Jul 29, 2020 / 12:39 PM EDT

COLUMBUS, Ohio — One car ride led to 10 people getting infected with the coronavirus, three businesses getting shut down and two people in the hospital, Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine said according to WJW.

DeWine shared the story during a news conference Tuesday afternoon.

“Unbelievable,” he said. “Ten people got sick. Two people ended up in the ICU. Three businesses were temporarily closed.”
An Ohio woman had contracted the virus but was asymptomatic when she got in a car with three other people over Independence Day weekend.

That ride caused the virus to spread to a man and his daughter who were in the car with her, WJW reports.

That man then spread the virus to two of his co-workers before ending up in the ICU himself. The business had to temporarily close.

The virus also spread to a grandmother and two of her caregivers, one of whom carried the virus to another patient, the governor said.

The woman reportedly infected her husband as well, leading to both her place of work and his to temporarily close.
One of her husband’s co-workers was getting ready for her wedding, but her possible infection forced her to quarantine on her wedding day, according to WJW.

Health departments are monitoring the patients.
The governor says that car ride will likely lead to more infections.
 

Zagdid

Veteran Member

All state COVID testing to be halted Friday through Tuesday due to storm
By Pat Mueller
Published: Jul. 29, 2020 at 1:56 PM EDT|Updated: 2 hours ago

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WCTV) - The Florida Division of Emergency Management says all state-run COVID-19 testing sites will be closed Friday through Tuesday as the state prepares for the possible impact of a tropical system in the Atlantic.
In an email sent to testing site managers on Wednesday, FDEM wrote “ALL sites will be closed at close of business tomorrow.”
The email went on to say since the storm should be cleared from Florida on Monday evening, sites can begin setting back up on Tuesday.
“We expect most sites can reopen Wednesday, pending any damage and vendor timelines,” the email said.
 

marsh

TB Fanatic
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=szHJIO3AFw8
14:31 min
125 - How COVID-19 is Impacting Baltimore Youths Experiencing Homelessness
•Jul 29, 2020


Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Over 300 homeless youths ages 14-25 come to the Youth Empowered Society (YES) Drop-in Center every year. They come for food, clothing, mental health counseling, job training, housing and rental assistance, and many more basic services. But COVID-19 is presenting even greater challenges for clients and has forced the staff to rethink service delivery models. YES executive director Blair Franklin talks with Dr. Josh Sharfstein about these challenges, innovations in care provision, dealing with staff exhaustion and burnout, and the added impacts of racial violence and protests on clients and staff.
 

marsh

TB Fanatic
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DnNLDla19FY
58:47 min
War Room Pandemic Ep 305 - Hearings on the Hill
•Streamed live 7 hours ago


Bannon WarRoom - Citizens of the American Republic


Steve Bannon and Jack Maxey are joined by Dr. Li Meng Yan and Curt Mills to discuss the latest on the coronavirus pandemic as theres a lineup of hearings on Capitol Hill regarding AG Barr and Big Tech. Calling in is Bill McGinley and Darren Beattie call in to offer their insights on these hearings.

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View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WUXm0PepVUQ
58:21 min
War Room Pandemic Ep 306 - Fourth Turning Heroes (w/ Dr. Yan, and Lu De)
•Streamed live 6 hours ago


Bannon WarRoom - Citizens of the American Republic


Steve Bannon and Jack Maxey are joined by Dr. Li Meng Yan and Lu De to discuss the latest on the coronavirus pandemic as the Hong Kong defector shares her knowledge of what is going on China around COVID-19.
 

marsh

TB Fanatic
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gf-dGFbryho
29:22 min
COVID-19 and School Reopenings, with Katherine Auger, MD, MSc, and Julie Donohue, PhD
•Streamed live 104 minutes ago


JAMA Network

NOTE: Technical difficulties preempted this livestream. Watch it LIVE now at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gf-dG... Katherine Auger, MD, MSc of Cincinatti Children's Hospital and Julie Donohue, PhD of University of Pittsburgh's Graduate School of Public Health discuss K-12 school reopening policy options and the way forward for the 2020-21 school year.
 

marsh

TB Fanatic
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SlU2Z6AUkg0
13:42 min
CONNECTED: How a Global Plan to RESET Economy, Netflix Shows, & Sports are Targeting your Kids
•Jul 29, 2020


Glenn Beck

We are in the middle of the biggest, most well-funded, global coup. And COVID-19 gave its leaders the perfect, most convenient tool to destroy the Western economy and start anew. Because once the Western economy is destroyed, all things are possible. That's why the World Economic Forum is using today's coronavirus chaos as their chance to RESET the global economy, with targeted focus on fighting inequality, climate change, and...capitalism?! Meanwhile, BLM organizers are using shows on Netflix and social justice messages in sports to target your kids...Glenn explains what will happen next if we don't stand up and fight for liberty.
 

marsh

TB Fanatic
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r4wCCkTXhC8
10:30 min
As COVID-19 deaths rise, new controversy over hydroxychloroquine
•Jul 29, 2020


CBS News

Coronavirus cases and deaths keep rising in many states. CBS News' Laura Podesta reports on the latest, and Dr. Dara Kass, an ER doctor and Yahoo News medical contributor, joined CBSN to discuss the latest figures, concerns about COVID-19's impact on the heart, and the controversy surrounding the drug hydroxychloroquine.
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View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5phh5xKNgas
1:59 min
Philly students will receive online-only learning to begin new school year, officials say
•Jul 28, 2020


CBS News

In a reversal from the original Philadelphia schools reopening plan, the school district is proposing that students continue virtual learning at least through November amid the coronavirus pandemic. CBS Philadelphia's Natasha Brown reports.
 

marsh

TB Fanatic
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H5qtSBKVe6U
5:16 min
White House official on Trump’s plan for coronavirus relief l GMA
•Jul 29, 2020


Good Morning America

Trade adviser Peter Navarro speaks out on “GMA” about what the president is willing to do to help Americans out of work because of the pandemic.

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View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nankV-TbCmA
6:43 min
NBA Commissioner Adam Silver says league will ‘cease completely’ if COVID breaks out l GMA
•Jul 29, 2020


Good Morning America


Silver, who is heading to Orlando Thursday, talked about plans in case of an outbreak, why it’s important to continue the season and the league’s response to the Black Lives Matter movement.
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View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r0FyAGVFtPo
3:15 min
JetBlue to test UV cleaning inside its planes l GMA
•Jul 29, 2020


Good Morning America


JetBlue is the first major U.S. airline to test UV cleaning inside the cabin as airlines try to increase safety standards amid the coronavirus pandemic.
 

marsh

TB Fanatic
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4kg-vZnXNDk
8:43 min
20/20 | American Catastrophe | PART 1
•Jul 28, 2020


ABC News

U.S. health officials saw an email alert on New Year’s Eve that would become the nightmare they had all trained for. The government launched into action but the virus was already in Central China.

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View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1kq1BV3Coxk
7:29 min
20/20 | American Catastrophe | PART 2
•Jul 28, 2020


ABC News

The Trump administration took steps to keep COVID-19 from reaching the U.S., but the pandemic playbook -- developed by prior administrations -- remained unused without a pandemic-planning office.
 

marsh

TB Fanatic
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uJ4WogAatiE
2:38 min
New Concerns Over Large Gatherings As U.S. Coronavirus Death Toll Tops 150,000 | NBC Nightly News
•Jul 28, 2020


NBC News

With coronavirus cases surging across the U.S., there are new concerns about large gatherings taking place in multiple cities with no social distancing or masks, including a crowded concert in New York.

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View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c4B2vxzYdp0
2:54 min
LA Mayor Garcetti On Fighting Coronavirus In The Nation’s Second Largest City | NBC Nightly News
•Jul 28, 2020


NBC News

In an exclusive interview with Lester Holt, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti says a second stay-at-home order is “always a possibility,” but that “things are stabilizing” and he doesn’t have many regrets about how he handled the coronavirus crisis in his city.

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View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hbXWO8Hoyw4
2:19 min
New York EMS Captain’s Warning From The Pandemic Front Lines | NBC Nightly News
•Jul 28, 2020


NBC News

NBC News followed Captain AJ Briones for months, getting a dramatic and deeply personal look at efforts to save lives at the height of its coronavirus outbreak.
 

marsh

TB Fanatic
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fIjfP6Ioh-k
2:15 min
Teachers Union Authorizes Strikes Over School Reopening Plans | NBC Nightly News
•Jul 28, 2020


NBC News

The nation’s second-largest teachers union authorized its 1.7 million members to strike in districts and states where certain safety standards are not met. One Connecticut summer program thinks they figured out how to reopen safely with small classes, masks, outdoor learning and partitions between teachers and students.
 
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