SITUATIONAL AWARENESS 101

Grammytomany

Inactive
I am always aware but I am not afraid. You cannot be safe if you are always afraid. I do look at people...straight on. You can tell an awful lot that way and know how to change gears if need be. Also, be aware when leaving a pharmacy, do not have a bag that screams (I just came from a pharmacy). You are looking to get hit hard if they think you have drugs. Carry a shopping bag that just says I bought some groceries or clothes, etc. In fact I am going to ask our pharmacy to stop using those "look what I have bags". Also, I learned by being stalked on a walk with my dog to leave my gorgeous rings home!!! Car with two nasties in it paced me ...for a mile...waiting for me to get to a wooded and very private area. I just turned around and went home and called the cops. I was bull......! My only day off and I wanted to walk with my dog but I forgot that I had what looked like the hope diamond on my left hand (my fault) and I never did that again. Sad, but jewelry stays in the box. Hope this will help some of you. As we age, we become bigger targets cuz the bad guys think we can't fight back. Surprise!! GTM
 

Garryowen

TB Fanatic
Grammy,

If you're north of Canada, you must be in Alaska, so you should be able to pack a weapon. I think dogs and guns are excellent deterrents to crime. It seems we have recently had some burglaries in our area. Hopefully, they will find that watch out for each other around here.

regards,

Garryowen
 

L.A.B.

Has No Life - Lives on TB
Enhancing Situational Awareness- Witnessing 101.

It's funny, in a strange sort of way, recalling details vs. real-time situational awareness; both are skill sets of observation. One relies on the individuals power of recall on top of a managed situation; the other simply taking in all the information of action from an atagonist and responding or allocating contingencies in real time.

In my time I have had the opportunity to test myself on several occasions; both in real time situational awareness and recalling specific details of events witnessed. I have found my strong point is real-time delegating of multiple antagonist moves; yet recalling specifics of singular events can task my power of recall after an event...

Does anyone know how to enhance the power of recall?

There must be specific training for this skill-set. I'm game for the discipline *if* there is a protocol.

Just trying to enhance a new skill-set, that's all.
 

MaureenO

Another Infidel
Enhancing Situational Awareness- Witnessing 101.

It's funny, in a strange sort of way, recalling details vs. real-time situational awareness; both are skill sets of observation. One relies on the individuals power of recall on top of a managed situation; the other simply taking in all the information of action from an atagonist and responding or allocating contingencies in real time.

In my time I have had the opportunity to test myself on several occasions; both in real time situational awareness and recalling specific details of events witnessed. I have found my strong point is real-time delegating of multiple antagonist moves; yet recalling specifics of singular events can task my power of recall after an event...

Does anyone know how to enhance the power of recall?

There must be specific training for this skill-set. I'm game for the discipline *if* there is a protocol.

Just trying to enhance a new skill-set, that's all.
As you know, eye-witness testimony is the most unreliable tool unless the eye-witness is a trained observer. Your personal skills are excellent, as are mine, but there's always something new we can (and should) learn.

As a rule, when observing a subject I begin at the top of their head--hat; hair colour and length; facial features--dark, light, glasses, complexion irregularities; facial hair; ears; teeth; eye colour if visible, etc. Then work downwards to size, age, clothing, baggage, etc.

Observational skills can be learned. I'll check for some on-line information.

MAC :dstrs:
 

L.A.B.

Has No Life - Lives on TB
Thanks FarOut and MaureenO. I will check out the links provided.

ETA: Maureen, I actually saw the moon walking bear and then I lost count of the white team passes. Oh well.
 

MaureenO

Another Infidel
Thanks FarOut and MaureenO. I will check out the links provided.

ETA: Maureen, I actually saw the moon walking bear and then I lost count of the white team passes. Oh well.
LOL! You ninny! :lkick: I saw this first a year or so ago and I did NOT observe the bear...

MAC :dstrs:
 

MaureenO

Another Infidel
Be particularly aware of any unusual circs around "soft targets." Schools, malls, theatres, restaurants, nightclubs, bars, etc.

Mo
 

bluetick

Veteran Member
Thanks Mo! Would this suggestion be aimed at a particular part of the country, or is it nationwide? Any particular "group" of people who we should be most wary about?
 

BigFootsCousin

Molon Labe!
Everyone should 'bump-up' their level of S.A. again, due to the current events unfolding with the asassination of OBL. I know that I'm already doing it.

BFC
 

Shacknasty Shagrat

Has No Life - Lives on TB
Sadly, it is time to bump this thread.
What happened in Oslo and the youth camp can happen here.
Look around. Pay attention to someone/something that seems out of place or does not belong.
Establish at least one escape route.
This thread has many good suggestions and is worth a review.
SS
 

Garryowen

TB Fanatic
Yes, SS, that is kinda what I was thinking also. Maybe some of our police types could give us some hints as to what might give an imposter away. Generally, we can't know all of the police force on a personal basis, so what mannerisms, etc, might tip us off?

MO? Timbo, TP? Help us out if you can.

regards,

Garryowen
 

Siskiyoumom

Veteran Member
Bump....

With the increasing amount of ows - and possibility of getting in the way of those who are protesting, you may need to rethink your driving and walking routes.

The closest little town near us has ows folks encamped on the plaza.

This means I do not go near there.
 

Be Well

may all be well
Good idea, Siskyoumom. In that regard, read the article I just now posted on the ongoing OWSer thread. They want violence and are inciting it and it would be dangerous to be around any of these "protests".
 

MaureenO

Another Infidel
Yes, SS, that is kinda what I was thinking also. Maybe some of our police types could give us some hints as to what might give an imposter away. Generally, we can't know all of the police force on a personal basis, so what mannerisms, etc, might tip us off?

MO? Timbo, TP? Help us out if you can.

regards,

Garryowen
Hey Garry!

I wish I could say more than "watch your back," but I can't. What I can say is to be exceptionally aware of all of your surroundings and understand that "things" are kicking into second gear way to fast. IOW, events can unfold fully tomorrow, or next year. There is no way to tell due to some sec. issues on their end.

Mo
 

Witness

Deceased
I am always aware but I am not afraid. You cannot be safe if you are always afraid. I do look at people...straight on. You can tell an awful lot that way and know how to change gears if need be. Also, be aware when leaving a pharmacy, do not have a bag that screams (I just came from a pharmacy). You are looking to get hit hard if they think you have drugs. Carry a shopping bag that just says I bought some groceries or clothes, etc. In fact I am going to ask our pharmacy to stop using those "look what I have bags". Also, I learned by being stalked on a walk with my dog to leave my gorgeous rings home!!! Car with two nasties in it paced me ...for a mile...waiting for me to get to a wooded and very private area. I just turned around and went home and called the cops. I was bull......! My only day off and I wanted to walk with my dog but I forgot that I had what looked like the hope diamond on my left hand (my fault) and I never did that again. Sad, but jewelry stays in the box. Hope this will help some of you. As we age, we become bigger targets cuz the bad guys think we can't fight back. Surprise!! GTM
You make a real good point. One day while I was driving, the glint of my ring
caught my eye. It is a fake diamond. I immediately removed it. I imagine that
would be a beacon to draw unwanted attention to me.


Grammy,

If you're north of Canada, you must be in Alaska, so you should be able to pack a weapon. I think dogs and guns are excellent deterrents to crime. It seems we have recently had some burglaries in our area. Hopefully, they will find that watch out for each other around here.

regards,

Garryowen
Garryowen,
You are assuming she is in Alaska, I bet she lives in the continental United States.
 
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Warthog

Has No Life - Lives on TB
Situational Awareness Can Save Your Life


Just as Smoke Manifests Risk of Fire., so Does Out of Place Human Behavior

Situational awareness can save your life. It can also make your life more interesting and fulfilling. Is situational awareness a magical thing that can protect you and enhance your life? Is situational awareness driven by Zen or depends divine intervention? Not so much. Situational awareness means that you are in tune with your environment. It means that you can spot danger before stepping into it. Let's look at the essentials of situational awareness and how you can employ simple rules to keep one step ahead, or away from danger.

Situational awareness calls on you to use your sense to scan your environment and seek out anything that's out of place. Situational awareness calls on your sense to focus on things around you instead of your inner thoughts, iPhone conversation, iPod track of the day or the flavor of your bubblegum. In essence you pay attention to things around you. Situational awareness allows you to spot things, both beautiful or dangerous that you'd otherwise ignore. It can enhance your life by allowing you to see the beauty of the world around you. If can save your life by spotting potential danger, thus allowing you to steer away from it.

Danger comes in many form, on dark city street, a quite country road or large and mostly empty parking lot. Since danger typically comes from other humans, detecting out of place human activity will be key to staying safe. A group of people that look suspicious ought to be avoided. Someone who seems to take particular interest in you and then appear more than once in your peripheral vision, ought to light a danger light in your brain. A car that seems to follow you, even when you make a few unusually moves, such as drive much slower or take a few turns, ought to flag possible danger. A cigarette light that hangs next to you car in an empty parking lot, that faces and focuses on you while you walk toward your park car is unusual you. In all of these examples, the common theme is something that's out of place—something that ought not happen in a standard setting. Situational awareness will flag these to your attention. As you well know, being aware of a problem goes a long way in solving it.

Whether on the streets or away from them, be aware of what's around you. Be aware that danger typically comes from humans and that humans are creatures of habit. Look around, enjoy what's around you and stay alert for potential danger. This can increase your quality of life and save you too. There's nothing more important than the reality that surrounds you at all times. Just as smoke signals risk of fire, so does out of place human behavior—situational awareness is critical and you ignore it at your own peril.

Until next time, stay safe by staying alert.
http://rationalselfdefense.com/Tactics/Street/Situational_Awarness_Can_Save_Your_Life.htm
 

whataday

Inactive
Thanks for the Great Info

New member. Been lurking a while. Thanks for all the great info here.

I have learned to never ignore that "uneasy", or "just not quite right" feeling. Even if drastic action is not needed, increased caution/awareness is a must.
 

MaureenO

Another Infidel
New member. Been lurking a while. Thanks for all the great info here.

I have learned to never ignore that "uneasy", or "just not quite right" feeling. Even if drastic action is not needed, increased caution/awareness is a must.
That has probably been instrumental in keeping you safe more times than you know.

Maureen :dstrs:
 

Shacknasty Shagrat

Has No Life - Lives on TB
MaureenO.

LEOs have training but if you are a regular civilian, or doing something important or knowing something important or around high value targets, this is an introduction to situational awareness.
This is a good STRATFOR series of articles on situational awareness. Some of the comments specifically agree with the thoughts posted here.
Surveillance and counter surveillance are covered in depth, as are the levels and reasons for the levels of situational awareness.
SS

http://www.stratfor.com/weekly/practical-guide-situational-awareness?utm_source=freelist-f&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20120315&utm_term=sweekly&utm_content=readmore&elq=8319797bab6c47a9a989d4b29a5da1db
 

Housecarl

On TB every waking moment
Here's the Stratfor article....

For links see article source....
Posted for fair use....
http://www.stratfor.com/weekly/practical-guide-situational-awareness

A Practical Guide to Situational Awareness

March 14, 2012 | 2147 GMT
By Scott Stewart

For the past three weeks we have been running a series in the Security Weekly that focuses on some of the fundamentals of terrorism. First, we noted that terrorism is a tactic not exclusive to any one group and that the tactic would not end even if the jihadist threat were to disappear. We then discussed how actors planning terrorist attacks have to follow a planning process and noted that there are times during that process when such plots are vulnerable to detection.

Last week we discussed how one of the most important vulnerabilities during the terrorism planning process is surveillance, and we outlined what bad surveillance looks like and described some basic tools to help identify those conducting it. At the end of last week's Security Weekly we also discussed how living in a state of paranoia and looking for a terrorist behind every bush not only is dangerous to one's physical and mental health but also results in poor security. This brings us to this week, where we want to discuss the fundamentals of situational awareness and explain how people can practice the technique in a relaxed and sustainable way.

Situational awareness is very important, not just for personal security but as a fundamental building block in collective security. Because of this importance, Stratfor has written about situational awareness many times in the past. However, we believe it merits repeating again in order to share these concepts with our new readers as well as serve as a reminder for our longtime readers.
More Mindset than Skill

It is important to note that situational awareness -- being aware of one's surroundings and identifying potential threats and dangerous situations -- is more of a mindset than a hard skill. Because of this, situational awareness is not something that can be practiced only by highly trained government agents or specialized corporate security teams. Indeed, it can be exercised by anyone with the will and the discipline to do so. Situational awareness is not only important for recognizing terrorist threats, but it also serves to identify criminal behavior and other dangerous situations.

The primary element in establishing this mindset is first to recognize that threats exist. Ignorance or denial of a threat make a person's chances of quickly recognizing an emerging threat and avoiding it highly unlikely. Bad things do happen. Apathy, denial and complacency can be deadly.

A second important element of the proper mindset is understanding the need to take responsibility for one's own security. The resources of any government are finite and the authorities simply cannot be everywhere and cannot stop every potential terrorist attack or other criminal action. The same principle applies to private security at businesses or other institutions, like places of worship. Therefore, people need to look out for themselves and their neighbors.

Another important facet of this mindset is learning to trust your "gut" or intuition. Many times a person's subconscious can notice subtle signs of danger that the conscious mind has difficulty quantifying or articulating. I have interviewed many victims who experienced such feelings of danger prior to an incident but who chose to ignore them. Trusting your gut and avoiding a potentially dangerous situation may cause you a bit of inconvenience, but ignoring such feelings can lead to serious trouble.

The discipline part of practicing situational awareness refers to the conscious effort required to pay attention to gut feelings and to surrounding events even while you are busy and distracted. At such times even obvious hostile activity can go unnoticed, so individuals need to learn to be observant even while doing other things.
Levels of Awareness

People typically operate on five distinct levels of awareness. There are many ways to describe these levels ("Cooper's colors," for example, which is a system frequently used in law enforcement and military training), but perhaps the most effective way to illustrate the differences between the levels is to compare them to the different degrees of attention we practice while driving. For our purposes here we will refer to the five levels as "tuned out," "relaxed awareness," "focused awareness," "high alert" and "comatose."

The first level, tuned out, is similar to when you are driving in a very familiar environment or are engrossed in thought, a daydream, a song on the radio or even by the kids fighting in the backseat. Increasingly, cellphone calls and texting are also causing people to tune out while they drive. Have you ever arrived somewhere in your vehicle without even really thinking about your drive there? If so, then you've experienced being tuned out.

The second level of awareness, relaxed awareness, is like defensive driving. This is a state in which you are relaxed but are also watching the other cars on the road and are looking at the road ahead for potential hazards. For example, if you are approaching an intersection and another driver looks like he may not stop, you tap your brakes to slow your car in case he does not. Defensive driving does not make you weary, and you can drive this way for a long time if you have the discipline to keep yourself from slipping into tuned-out mode. If you are practicing defensive driving you can still enjoy the trip, look at the scenery and listen to the radio, but you cannot allow yourself to get so engrossed in those distractions that they exclude everything else. You are relaxed and enjoying your drive, but you are still watching for road hazards, maintaining a safe following distance and keeping an eye on the behavior of the drivers around you.

The next level of awareness, focused awareness, is like driving in hazardous road conditions. You need to practice this level of awareness when you are driving on icy or slushy roads -- or the pothole-infested roads populated by erratic drivers that exist in many developing countries. When you are driving in such an environment, you need to keep two hands on the wheel at all times and have your attention totally focused on the road and the other drivers around you. You don't dare take your eyes off the road or let your attention wander. There is no time for cellphone calls or other distractions. The level of concentration required for this type of driving makes it extremely tiring and stressful. A drive that you normally would not think twice about will totally exhaust you under these conditions because it demands prolonged and total concentration.

The fourth level of awareness is high alert. This is the level that induces an adrenaline rush, a prayer and a gasp for air all at the same time. This is what happens when that car you are watching at the intersection ahead doesn't stop at the stop sign and pulls out right in front of you. High alert can be scary, but at this level you are still able to function. You can hit your brakes and keep your car under control. In fact, the adrenaline rush you get at this stage can sometimes aid your reflexes.

The last level of awareness, comatose, is what happens when you literally freeze at the wheel and cannot respond to stimuli, either because you have fallen asleep or, at the other end of the spectrum, because you are petrified. It is this panic-induced paralysis that concerns us most in relation to situational awareness. The comatose level is where you go into shock, your brain ceases to process information and you simply cannot react to the reality of the situation. Many times when this happens, a person can go into denial, believing that "this can't be happening to me," or the person can feel as though he or she is observing the event rather than actually participating in it. Often, the passage of time will seem to grind to a halt. Crime victims frequently report experiencing this sensation and being unable to act during an unfolding crime.
Finding the Right Level

Now that we've discussed the different levels of awareness, let's focus on identifying what level is ideal at a given time. The body and mind both require rest, so we have to spend several hours each day at the comatose level while asleep. When we are sitting at our homes watching a movie or reading a book, it is perfectly fine to operate in the tuned-out mode. However, some people will attempt to maintain the tuned-out mode in decidedly inappropriate environments (e.g., when they are out on the street at night in a Third World barrio), or they will maintain a mindset wherein they deny that criminals can victimize them. "That couldn't happen to me, so there's no need to watch for it." This results in their being tuned out to any potential threats.

If you are tuned out while you are driving and something happens -- say, a child runs out into the road or a car stops quickly in front of you -- you will not see the problem coming. This usually means that you either do not see the hazard in time to avoid it and you hit it, or you totally panic, freeze and cannot react to it -- neither is good. These reactions (or lack of reactions) occur because it is very difficult to change mental states quickly, especially when the adjustment requires moving several steps, say, from tuned out to high alert. It is like trying to shift your car directly from first gear into fifth and it shudders and stalls. Many times, when people are forced to make this mental jump and they panic (and stall), they go into shock and will actually freeze and be unable to take any action -- they go comatose. This happens not only when driving but also when a criminal catches someone totally unaware and unprepared. While training does help people move up and down the alertness continuum, it is difficult for even highly trained individuals to transition from tuned out to high alert. This is why law enforcement and military personnel receive so much training on situational awareness.

It is critical to stress here that situational awareness does not mean being paranoid or obsessively concerned about security. In fact, people simply cannot operate in a state of focused awareness for extended periods, and high alert can be maintained only for very brief periods before exhaustion sets in. The "fight-or-flight" response can be very helpful if it can be controlled. When it gets out of control, however, a constant stream of adrenaline and stress is simply not healthy for the body and mind, and this also hampers security. Therefore, operating constantly in a state of high alert is not the answer, nor is operating for prolonged periods in a state of focused alert, which can also be demanding and completely enervating. The human body was simply not designed to operate under constant stress. All people, even highly skilled operators, require time to rest and recover.

Because of this, the basic level of situational awareness that should be practiced most of the time is relaxed awareness, a state of mind that can be maintained indefinitely without all the stress and fatigue associated with focused awareness or high alert. Relaxed awareness is not tiring, and it allows you to enjoy life while rewarding you with an effective level of personal security. When people are in an area where there is potential danger (which, in reality, is almost anywhere), they should go through most of the day in a state of relaxed awareness. Then if they spot something out of the ordinary that could be a threat, they can "dial up" to a state of focused awareness and take a careful look at that potential threat (and also look for others in the area). If the possible threat proves innocuous, or is simply a false alarm, they can dial back down into relaxed awareness and continue on their way. If, on the other hand, the potential threat becomes a probable threat, seeing it in advance allows a person to take actions to avoid it. In such a case they may never need to elevate to high alert, since they have avoided the problem at an early stage.

However, once a person is in a state of focused awareness they are far better prepared to handle the jump to high alert if the threat does change from potential to actual -- if the three guys lurking on the corner do start advancing and look as if they are reaching for weapons.

Of course, when a person knowingly ventures into an area that is very dangerous, it is only prudent to practice focused awareness while in that area. For example, if there is a specific section of highway where a lot of improvised explosive devices detonate and ambushes occur, or if there is a part of a city that is controlled (and patrolled) by criminal gangs -- and the area cannot be avoided for whatever reason -- it would be prudent to practice a heightened level of awareness when in those areas. An increased level of awareness is also prudent when engaging in common or everyday tasks, such as visiting an ATM or walking to the car in a dark parking lot. When the time of potential danger has passed, it is then easy to shift back to a state of relaxed awareness.

People can hone their situational awareness ability by practicing some simple drills. For example, you can consciously move your awareness level up to a focused state for short periods of time during the day. Some examples of this can include identifying all the exits when you enter a building, counting the number of people in a restaurant or subway car, or noting which cars take the same turns in traffic. One trick that many law enforcement officers are taught is to take a look at the people around them and attempt to figure out their stories, in other words, what they do for a living, their mood, what they are focused on and what it appears they are preparing to do that day, based merely on observation. Employing such simple focused-awareness drills will train a person's mind to be aware of these things almost subconsciously when the person is in a relaxed state of awareness.

This situational awareness process also demonstrates the importance of people being familiar with their environment and the dangers that are present there. Such awareness permits some threats to be avoided and others to be guarded against when you must venture into a dangerous area.

Not everyone is forced to live in the type of intense threat environment currently found in places like Mogadishu, Juarez or Kandahar. Nonetheless, average citizens all over the world face many different kinds of threats on a daily basis -- from common thieves and assailants to criminals and mentally disturbed individuals intending to conduct violent acts to militants wanting to carry out large-scale attacks.

As we noted two weeks ago, some of the steps required to conduct these attacks must be accomplished in a manner that makes the actions visible to the potential victim and outside observers -- if people are looking for such actions. It is at these junctures that people practicing situational awareness can detect these attack steps, avoid the danger themselves and alert the authorities to protect others.

As the jihadist threat continues to devolve from one based on al Qaeda the group to one based on grassroots cells and lone wolves, grassroots defenders -- ordinary citizens practicing good situational awareness -- become more important than ever before.

Read more: A Practical Guide to Situational Awareness | Stratfor
 

jehu

Mapper of Landmarks
This was discussed at one point, and upon watching the attached video, thought of this thread.

 

Rustic Rose

Contributing Member
I hope this isn't thread drift, Maureen, but I just have to comment on something that I very often see when I go into town for one thing or another. Almost without exception, women shoppers will leave their purse in the kiddy carrier of their shopping basket, sitting there wide open, while they wander off trying to find the right color of toilet seat cover. They have absolutely no situational awareness. None. Anyone could just walk by, grab either the whole purse or the wallet and keys sitting visible in it, and keep on going. It'd be quite some time before Suzy Shopper discovered what had happened. I've once or twice suggested to some of these people that they are making themselves highly vulnerable to loss, but have stopped doing so as the general reaction is haughty indignation.

Just had to get that off my chest...wake up, ladies!
I put my purse in the kiddy carrier, but I use the seatbelt to strap it in and always have it closed, and always know who is around me, and how far I am from my cart.
 

Helpful

Contributing Member
I can't believe, after ALL I HAVE BEEN TAUGHT, I actually became a victim of unawareness today.

Let me back up. This morning I went to the grocery store, one I don't frequent, however, today I decided to go there. There was one item I needed and I found it, put it in the basket and proceeded to look around. The meat section had some very good prices. While I was looking through the selection, I heard the lady from the meat department (whom I have never met) ask a gentleman who was standing about 6 feet to the left of me, if he needed any help finding anything to which he shook his head no. After this she came over to me and said, "Watch out for this guy." I thought she meant that he might be trying to steal some meat or something. Then she continued, "He has been following you all around the store and staring at you." I responded, "WHAT?" She kept her voice low and ushered me into another aisle to continue to talk to me. She told me that she had noticed him following me and decided to watch him. Everywhere I went, he went and she said he just kept staring at me. She had asked him on three separate occasions (according to her) if he needed assistance finding something or if she could help him and each time he just responded with a no. He didn't have a cart or basket, and he never purchased anything. She asked me if I was aware that he was following me and I told her I had no idea. This is when it hit me. I felt so vulnerable and stupid! I am ALWAYS preaching about being aware of one's surroundings and being alert. How could I have had this happen to ME? As she went on to talk to me, he appeared again. She said, I am going to go tell the manager. I just said that I had finished shopping and wanted to check out. She told me just to continue shopping if I wanted. They had cameras and she was watching him and would have the manager aware of the situation as well. Needless to say, I left.
I guess the bottom line is, you can NEVER let your guard down. How fortunate I was for her to have seen him and warn me (I really think it was one of GOD's good angels who intercepted on my behalf :) ) In any case, lesson learned.
 

Tennessee gal

Veteran Member
I can't believe, after ALL I HAVE BEEN TAUGHT, I actually became a victim of unawareness today.

Let me back up. This morning I went to the grocery store, one I don't frequent, however, today I decided to go there. There was one item I needed and I found it, put it in the basket and proceeded to look around. The meat section had some very good prices. While I was looking through the selection, I heard the lady from the meat department (whom I have never met) ask a gentleman who was standing about 6 feet to the left of me, if he needed any help finding anything to which he shook his head no. After this she came over to me and said, "Watch out for this guy." I thought she meant that he might be trying to steal some meat or something. Then she continued, "He has been following you all around the store and staring at you." I responded, "WHAT?" She kept her voice low and ushered me into another aisle to continue to talk to me. She told me that she had noticed him following me and decided to watch him. Everywhere I went, he went and she said he just kept staring at me. She had asked him on three separate occasions (according to her) if he needed assistance finding something or if she could help him and each time he just responded with a no. He didn't have a cart or basket, and he never purchased anything. She asked me if I was aware that he was following me and I told her I had no idea. This is when it hit me. I felt so vulnerable and stupid! I am ALWAYS preaching about being aware of one's surroundings and being alert. How could I have had this happen to ME? As she went on to talk to me, he appeared again. She said, I am going to go tell the manager. I just said that I had finished shopping and wanted to check out. She told me just to continue shopping if I wanted. They had cameras and she was watching him and would have the manager aware of the situation as well. Needless to say, I left.
I guess the bottom line is, you can NEVER let your guard down. How fortunate I was for her to have seen him and warn me (I really think it was one of GOD's good angels who intercepted on my behalf :) ) In any case, lesson learned.
I am thankful you are ok.

I would have probably ask a manager to walk me to the car and if the guy followed in his car I would have headed to the police station.
One night after I had put my geocery bags in the trunk, I was opening the door and a young guy ran past me and tried to snatch my purse. The only reason he didn't get it was it had two straps. He broke one but the other held. I was parked close to the store under a flood light, and the only thing I heard as he rushed past me was the swishing sound of his tennis shoes but I didn't react fast enough . Lesson learned ! I sometimes wonder how many gardian angels I have worn out !lol
 

Helpful

Contributing Member
I am thankful you are ok.

I would have probably ask a manager to walk me to the car and if the guy followed in his car I would have headed to the police station.
One night after I had put my geocery bags in the trunk, I was opening the door and a young guy ran past me and tried to snatch my purse. The only reason he didn't get it was it had two straps. He broke one but the other held. I was parked close to the store under a flood light, and the only thing I heard as he rushed past me was the swishing sound of his tennis shoes but I didn't react fast enough . Lesson learned ! I sometimes wonder how many gardian angels I have worn out !lol
Thanks Tennessee Gal. I still can't believe how oblivious I was and how fortunate to have had that lady watching. You sure had a close call too! Wow. I guess between the two of us we really DO keep those angels busy.
 

judykks

Inactive
Having lived through lengthy power outages due to ice storms, we have become quite attached to our old rotary dial phone. It does work when nothing else does.
 

Dphintias

Veteran Member
Having lived through lengthy power outages due to ice storms, we have become quite attached to our old rotary dial phone. It does work when nothing else does.
Couldn't agree more especially for country living. I wouldn't give mine up for anything. When the electricity goes out so, of course, does our cable, but for some reason our phone lines always stay intact. So I won't run my telephone land line through the cable lines either. Where I live, the power has been out sometimes for days on end but the phone stayed on.
 

Floratrek

Veteran Member
Thought you may be interested in this. Posted on the Indiana Sentinels Page on Facebook. I am working on verifying this, any help would be appreciated. GOD speed!

Indiana Sentinels
29 minutes ago ·
INTEL BRIEFING – 3/11/13
For dissemination throughout the Frontiersmen and to our friends
RE: Federal action against patriot groups in US
Today at 10AM there was a very large meeting at the FBI's Criminal Justice Information Services Division (CJIS) headquarters in Clarksburg, WV. The meeting was held in an auditorium and included everyone – from agents to the secretaries. The meeting was organized by the Director of the Biometric Identification Management Agency (BIMA), Colonel Bolo (ret.).
Bolo summarized the purchase of 24 new armored vehicles (each costing $400k) and the recent appearance of 20 mobile headquarters that are now present at the facility. The mobile units are semi-trailers with attached generators in the front; are of a shiny, mirrored-silver finish; and have no identifiable markings on them at all. There are 20 of them parked (visibly in front) at 1000 Cluster Hollow Rd, Clarksburg, WV as of today. Additionally, there are 24 armored cars (the same ones we have seen with DHS markings) parked in a different lot on this property, but they too may be visible.
The Colonel went into great detail on a list of patriot/constitutional groups. According to witnesses, this is a list that may be identical or very close to the one put out by the SPLC but had over 1000 groups on it. He explained that although groups may take advantage of the 2nd Amendment debate to garner followers now, at the heart of all these organizations is a racist core; one that poses a threat and will need to be dealt with soon. This is when he tied the armored cars and mobile command trailers to ‘the mission’.
The armored cars (those at the facility and nationwide) are to effect high-risk warrants on the ringleaders of the listed various groups with command centers being placed as necessary. The DHS and FBI are planning to move at one time against the listed groups; with SWAT teams being utilized against the more threatening ones. The colonel explained that all these groups have been successfully infiltrated and the leaders identified. He also explained that this is part of the new Internal Security Force that the president has been alluding to. In answering a question from an attendee regarding the mass purchase of ammo, he also stated that the buildup of arms and ammo was specifically for this ‘mission’.
The witness has told me that after the meeting, everyone they seen were against this. People were complaining, shaking their head in disbelief, and asking what the heck going on. According to them, NOBODY (including federal agents present) planned on going along with this and many even talked about how this will ignite a war.
The report I received can be verified through any personal contacts you may have at this center or connected to the agencies mentioned. You may also visibly inspect the lot for these trailers by driving to the location in Clarksburg. The witness was extremely bothered by the meeting and has said ‘it is coming and a hell of a lot sooner than people think’.
I used to think that mass roundups would never happen – but with this new information, I can clearly see that this is exactly what is going to happen (at least to a certain number of militia/patriot groups). And inevitably, any action this crazy will result in a reaction by others. The specter of Civil War in this country is a real and present danger folks – prepare.
NOTE: I did ask a whole bunch of additional questions which hopefully will be answered soon.
Views: 252
 

Garryowen

TB Fanatic
Floratrek,

I think that FB would be about the last place I would expect reliable information. Absolutely no opsec there, and it is heavily data-mined. All activity there is archived. Some of these meetings are most likely set up with the intent of finding leaks. (Anyone listening to SPLC and believing them, is seriously lacking in sense, common or otherwise.)
 

FarmerJohn

Has No Life - Lives on TB
Having lived through lengthy power outages due to ice storms, we have become quite attached to our old rotary dial phone. It does work when nothing else does.
I hope you've not been renting it for an outrageous price like so many were for so many years.
 
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