BRKG AUG 11 2021 Dr Cory and the FLCCC Ivermectin Team Recommended Bigger Dose of Ivermectin for Covid19 Delta Variant.

Krayola

Veteran Member
I know, but putting water up my nose just creeps me out. I will go buy Listerine though. They might have it at the Dollar Tree.
Mary I don't like getting water in my nose when I go swimming but I can do nasal irrigation just fine.
It's not just "putting water up your nose"......that would not go well.

Nasal irrigation is done with a special solution that contains salt. When you have the proper solution, it does not hurt at all. Trust me. You can buy little packets at pharmacy/walmart to add to your water (for safety, always use distilled, or if you must use tap water, boil for at least 5 mins then cool)

If you don't want to buy the little salt packets, you make your own. I don't have a recipe handy but they are on the net. Just search for nasal rinse recipe. You will need to use either a neti pot or a Neil med bottle. I prefer the Neil med personally.
 

Mary Contrary

Veteran Member
You tilt your head back and pour into your nose, or you use a squeeze bottle with a wide tapering nozzle that makes a nice seal with your nose. I recommend the squeeze bottle, but many people use a ceramic pot. If you use the squeeze bottle you can lean over a sink, put it on one nostril, and the water flows through and out the other nostril. Works great.

The reason for distilling everything is that there are bacteria that can infect your brain from your nose. Major danger in some river systems. Could be in your well or tap water, depending on wheroe you are.
Oh ok I see now. I drink distilled water so have some.
 

Krayola

Veteran Member
My ENT says distilled water not necessary.

I was using distilled until he told me this
Well it is rare but there have been a few people who died and they traced it back to tap water used in a neti pot (brain eating amoeba or something) so even though rare, it is suggested that people boil tap water before using it in their sinuses.
 

summerthyme

Administrator
_______________
Well it is rare but there have been a few people who died and they traced it back to tap water used in a neti pot (brain eating amoeba or something) so even though rare, it is suggested that people boil tap water before using it in their sinuses.
Yeah, the risk is tiny, but the results so dire I'd use either distilled water or filtered water from a good filter.

Summerthyme
 

Rebel_Yell

Contributing Member
Just thought that I would throw this in the pot. I saw this health alert from the MS State Dept. of Health.

Increased Poison Control Calls due to Ivermectin Ingestion and Potential Toxicity





https://s3.documentcloud.org/documents/21046538/health-alert-for-ivermectin.pdf#page=1
https://s3.documentcloud.org/documents/21046538/health-alert-for-ivermectin.pdf#page=2
https://s3.documentcloud.org/documents/21046538/health-alert-for-ivermectin.pdf#page=3
570 East Woodrow Wilson ● Post Office Box 1700 ● Jackson, MS 39215-1700

601-576-8090 ● 1-866-HLTHY4U ● www.HealthyMS.com
Equal Opportunity in Employment/Services
This is an official
MS Health Alert Network (HAN) Alert




Dear Colleagues,

• The Mississippi Poison Control Center has received an increasing number of calls from
individuals with potential ivermectin exposure taken to treat or prevent COVID-19
infection.

• At least 70% of the recent calls have been related to ingestion of livestock or animal
formulations of ivermectin purchased at livestock supply centers.

• 85% of the callers had mild symptoms, but one individual was instructed to seek further
evaluation due to the amount of ivermectin reportedly ingested.

• No hospitalizations due to ivermectin toxicity have been directly reported to the
Mississippi Poison Control Center or the Mississippi State Department of Health.

• There are approved uses for ivermectin in both people and animals. Patients should be
advised to not take any medications intended to treat animals and should be instructed to
only take ivermectin as prescribed by their physician.

• Animal drugs are highly concentrated for large animals and can be highly toxic in
humans. Some of the symptoms associated with ivermectin toxicity include rash, nausea,
vomiting, abdominal pain, neurologic disorders, and potentially severe hepatitis requiring
hospitalization.

• Mississippi physicians, providers and hospitals that identify patients with illness
related to the ingestion of ivermectin, either prescribed or livestock formulations,
should report to the Mississippi Poison Control Center at 1-800-222-1222.
Additional Resources

• FAQ: COVID-19 and Ivermectin Intended for Animals | FDA
• Why You Should Not Use Ivermectin to Treat or Prevent COVID-19 | FDA

Regards,

Paul Byers, MD
State Epidemiologist
 

magnetic1

Veteran Member
I found ivermectin at a Mills Fleet Farm Store today and it was anywhere from 4.99 to 10 something a tube, depending on brand, and they had lots! Although, they have less now…and will have less tomorrow after I make another road trip…
 

John Green

Senior Member
Just thought that I would throw this in the pot. I saw this health alert from the MS State Dept. of Health.

Increased Poison Control Calls due to Ivermectin Ingestion and Potential Toxicity





https://s3.documentcloud.org/documents/21046538/health-alert-for-ivermectin.pdf#page=1
https://s3.documentcloud.org/documents/21046538/health-alert-for-ivermectin.pdf#page=2
https://s3.documentcloud.org/documents/21046538/health-alert-for-ivermectin.pdf#page=3
570 East Woodrow Wilson ● Post Office Box 1700 ● Jackson, MS 39215-1700

601-576-8090 ● 1-866-HLTHY4U ● www.HealthyMS.com
Equal Opportunity in Employment/Services
This is an official
MS Health Alert Network (HAN) Alert




Dear Colleagues,

• The Mississippi Poison Control Center has received an increasing number of calls from
individuals with potential ivermectin exposure taken to treat or prevent COVID-19
infection.

• At least 70% of the recent calls have been related to ingestion of livestock or animal
formulations of ivermectin purchased at livestock supply centers.

• 85% of the callers had mild symptoms, but one individual was instructed to seek further
evaluation due to the amount of ivermectin reportedly ingested.

• No hospitalizations due to ivermectin toxicity have been directly reported to the
Mississippi Poison Control Center or the Mississippi State Department of Health.

• There are approved uses for ivermectin in both people and animals. Patients should be
advised to not take any medications intended to treat animals and should be instructed to
only take ivermectin as prescribed by their physician.

• Animal drugs are highly concentrated for large animals and can be highly toxic in
humans. Some of the symptoms associated with ivermectin toxicity include rash, nausea,
vomiting, abdominal pain, neurologic disorders, and potentially severe hepatitis requiring
hospitalization.

• Mississippi physicians, providers and hospitals that identify patients with illness
related to the ingestion of ivermectin, either prescribed or livestock formulations,
should report to the Mississippi Poison Control Center at 1-800-222-1222.
Additional Resources

• FAQ: COVID-19 and Ivermectin Intended for Animals | FDA
• Why You Should Not Use Ivermectin to Treat or Prevent COVID-19 | FDA

Regards,

Paul Byers, MD
State Epidemiologist
In other words safer then the jab. Sounds good to me.
 

Weft and Warp

Senior Member
Just thought that I would throw this in the pot. I saw this health alert from the MS State Dept. of Health.

Increased Poison Control Calls due to Ivermectin Ingestion and Potential Toxicity





https://s3.documentcloud.org/documents/21046538/health-alert-for-ivermectin.pdf#page=1
https://s3.documentcloud.org/documents/21046538/health-alert-for-ivermectin.pdf#page=2
https://s3.documentcloud.org/documents/21046538/health-alert-for-ivermectin.pdf#page=3
570 East Woodrow Wilson ● Post Office Box 1700 ● Jackson, MS 39215-1700

601-576-8090 ● 1-866-HLTHY4U ● www.HealthyMS.com
Equal Opportunity in Employment/Services
This is an official
MS Health Alert Network (HAN) Alert




Dear Colleagues,

• The Mississippi Poison Control Center has received an increasing number of calls from
individuals with potential ivermectin exposure taken to treat or prevent COVID-19
infection.

• At least 70% of the recent calls have been related to ingestion of livestock or animal
formulations of ivermectin purchased at livestock supply centers.

• 85% of the callers had mild symptoms, but one individual was instructed to seek further
evaluation due to the amount of ivermectin reportedly ingested.

• No hospitalizations due to ivermectin toxicity have been directly reported to the
Mississippi Poison Control Center or the Mississippi State Department of Health.

• There are approved uses for ivermectin in both people and animals. Patients should be
advised to not take any medications intended to treat animals and should be instructed to
only take ivermectin as prescribed by their physician.

• Animal drugs are highly concentrated for large animals and can be highly toxic in
humans. Some of the symptoms associated with ivermectin toxicity include rash, nausea,
vomiting, abdominal pain, neurologic disorders, and potentially severe hepatitis requiring
hospitalization.

• Mississippi physicians, providers and hospitals that identify patients with illness
related to the ingestion of ivermectin, either prescribed or livestock formulations,
should report to the Mississippi Poison Control Center at 1-800-222-1222.
Additional Resources

• FAQ: COVID-19 and Ivermectin Intended for Animals | FDA
• Why You Should Not Use Ivermectin to Treat or Prevent COVID-19 | FDA

Regards,

Paul Byers, MD
State Epidemiologist
Yeah, I believe people are panicking.... I wonder if these ones believed "If a little is good, then more is better"? Not a good thing when dealing with medicine!
 

Mary Contrary

Veteran Member
So I am still confused. Dr. Kory says to take Ivermectin more often now cuz of Delta? Once a wk? I take the horse paste once a month. Do I now take it once a wk?
 

summerthyme

Administrator
_______________
So I am still confused. Dr. Kory says to take Ivermectin more often now cuz of Delta? Once a wk? I take the horse paste once a month. Do I now take it once a wk?
I've settled on 2x a month as the best balance between efficacy and safety. If we will be exposed (like the family wedding two weeks ago) to large crowds, and it's been more than a week since we took a dose, we'll take one before leaving. But at this point, in our personal situation, I'm not taking it weekly.

Summerthyme
 

Mary Contrary

Veteran Member
I've settled on 2x a month as the best balance between efficacy and safety. If we will be exposed (like the family wedding two weeks ago) to large crowds, and it's been more than a week since we took a dose, we'll take one before leaving. But at this point, in our personal situation, I'm not taking it weekly.

Summerthyme
Ok thanks!! So I will do 2x a month then. Took on the 11th so will wait for very end of July then I can do the 15th and then 30th of the month. Easier to remember that way.
 

BuffaloJo

Member
Hey Guys, read post # 1 on dose frequency!
Edit to add the Out patient / Home care dosing Sorry.... my meds are running low.

I hope this isn't a dup... Im not an MD, Not medical advice,

FLCCC = "Frontline Covid Critical Care"

Edited to add correct link:


View attachment 282570View attachment 282573

Pierre Cory, MD, a director of the "Frontline Covid Critical Care" team, has sacrificed 2 jobs at Major Hospitals, to make this information available to the public. The Big Pharmaceutical Companies would like the FLCCC to be destroyed, blocked on all Public websites.

Please pay attention. And bookmark this Thread for the lives of you families.
 

lanningro

Senior Member
Couple of nights ago we were at an impromptu geetar and fiddle session. Lots of folks have cattle so quart bottles of 1% Ivermectin are very common.
Was told 2cc in orange juice is fine but do that in a bottle of beer and you have a beer fountain.
Go figure, cows drink beer.
 

Countrymouse

Country exile in the city
HOT OFF THE PRESS: IVERMECTIN TOXICITIES in ANIMALS and DOSES that are Safe. In English, just the Title of the Journal is in Spanish??

PARASITIPEDIA.net
Parásitos del Ganado, Caballos, Perros y Gatos: Biología y Cont


Acute Toxicity of Ivermectin (LD50 = lethal dose in 50% of the subjects/ animals)
  • LD50 acute, mice, p.o. 25 mg/kg WOW
  • LD50 acute, rat, p.o. 50 mg/kg
  • LD50 acute, rat: dermal >600 mg/kg WOW WOW
  • LD50 acute, dog without MDR-1 gene defect: p.o. 80 mg/kg
  • LD50 acute, dog with MDR-1 gene defect: p.o. 0.2 mg/kg (sad, but they are not humans)

Edited to add by OP: Are you a Dog with a genetic defect or are you a Pig

Yes Yes Yes..... be very careful giving Ivermectin to any dog that has a very specific genetic mutation, see below.





IVERMECTIN: SAFETY SUMMARY for VETERINARY use in Dogs, Cats, Cattle, Sheep, Goats, Swine, Horses &Poultry.

Poisoning, intoxication, overdose, antidote


WHO Acute Hazard classification: Not listed

Mechanism of Action of Ivermectin
As all macrocyclic lactones, ivermectin acts as agonist of the GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) neurotransmitter in nerve cells and also binds to glutamate-gated chloride channels in nerve and muscle cells of invertebrates. In both cases it blocks the transmission of neuronal signals of the parasites, which are paralyzed and expelled out of the body, or they starve. It also affects the reproduction of some parasites by diminishing oviposition or inducing an abnormal oogenesis.
In mammals the GABA receptors occur only in the central nervous system (CNS), i.e. in the brain and the spinal chord. But mammals have a so-called blood-brain barrier that prevents microscopic objects and large molecules to get into the brain. Consequently macrocyclic lactones are much less toxic to mammals than to parasites without such a barrier, which allows quite high safety margins for use on livestock and pets. A notable exception to this are dog breeds that carry the MDR-1 gene defect (see later).



Ivermectin Dosing

  • Click here to view the article on Ivermectin dose for Dogs
  • Click here to view the article on Ivermectin Dose for Cats
  • Click here to view the article on Ivermectin dose for Horses, Cattle, Sheep, Goats, Swine, Poultry, etc.
Acute Toxicity of Ivermectin (LD50 = lethal dose in 50% of the subjects/ animals)
  • LD50 acute, mice, p.o. 25 mg/kg WOW
  • LD50 acute, rat, p.o. 50 mg/kg
  • LD50 acute, rat: dermal >600 mg/kg WOW WOW
  • LD50 acute, dog without MDR-1 gene defect: p.o. 80 mg/kg
  • LD50 acute, dog with MDR-1 gene defect: p.o. 0.2 mg/kg (sad, but they are not humans)
Ivermectin Tolerance

Dogs without MDR-1 gene defect
  • Safety margin: ~4
  • After single dose delivery, oral
    • 2.0 mg/kg: usually without neurotoxic symptoms
    • 2.5 mg/kg: mydriasis (dilatation of the pupils)
    • 5.0 mg/kg: mydriasis, tremor (uncoordinated trembling or shaking movements)
    • 10 mg/kg: mydriasis, serious tremor, ataxia (uncoordinated movements)
    • 40 mg/kg: coma (persistence unconsciousness), death possible
  • Daily oral administration during 14 days
    • 0.5 mg/kg/day: usually without symptoms
    • 1.0 mg/kg/day: mydriasis (dilatation of the pupils)
  • Single subcutaneous injection
    • 4.7 mg/kg: mydriasis (dilatation of the pupils), salivation
    • 9.7 mg/kg: ataxia (uncoordinated movements), depression, death
Dogs with MDR-1 gene defect
  • Lowest single oral dose without symptoms: 0.06 mg/kg (= 60 mcg/kg)
  • Doses > 0.1 mg/kg (= 100 mcg/kg) cause massive neurological symptoms: mydriasis (dilatation of the pupils), tremor (uncoordinated trembling or shaking movements), ataxia (uncoordinated movements), vomit
  • Doses > 0.15 mg/kg (= 150 mcg/kg) cause comatose state and possible death
Cats
  • Cats, including exotic breeds (e.g. Siamese, Persian) usually tolerate well doses up to 1 mg/kg. But cat intoxications have also been reported.
  • Oral pastes for horses are not recommended at > 0.5 mg/kg.
Cattle
  • Cattle tolerate ivermectin very well.
  • The therapeutic margin or index is ~30.
  • Well tolerated doses:
    • Single subcutaneous injection: up to 6 mg/kg
    • Single oral administration: up to 2 mg/kg
    • Daily oral administration: up to 1.2 mg/kg x 3 days
  • Doses that cause neurological symptoms:
    • Single oral dose: 4 mg/kg
    • Single subcutaneous injection: 8 mg/kg
Sheep
  • Sheep tolerate ivermectin very well.
  • The safety margin is ~30.
  • Doses of up to 4.0 mg/kg do not cause clinical symptoms.
Swine
  • Swine tolerate ivermectin very well.
  • Doses 10 a 50 times higher than the therapeutic dose of 0.3 mg/kg (single subcutaneous injection) caused no toxic symptoms.
  • A single subcutaneous injection of 30 mg/kg (100 times the therapeutic dose) causes lethargy, ataxia (uncoordinated movements), mydriasis (dilatation of the pupils) and tremor (uncoordinated trembling or shaking movements).
Horses
  • Horses tolerate ivermectin very well.
  • The safety margin is ~10.
  • Orals doses of 1.2 and 1.8 mg/kg were well tolerated.
  • Oral doses of 2 mg/kg during 2 consecutive days causes slight ataxia (uncoordinated movements), depression and apparent blindness.
  • Oral doses from 3 to 6 mg/kg (15 to 30 x the therapeutic dose of 0.2 mg/kg) caused mydriasis (dilatation of the pupils) and loss of ocular reflexes.
Birds
  • Most poultry species tolerate ivermectin quite well.
  • However, some birds (parakeets, parrots, canaries, finches, etc.) do not tolerate ivermectin. Ivermectin spot-ons are particularly dangerous.

Toxic Symptoms caused by Ivermectin Poisoning

General symptoms
  • The symptoms of ivermectin poisoning are the consequence of an excessive concentration of the molecule in the CNS (Central Nervous System) and the subsequent increase of GABA activity. Ivermectin stimulates the release of the GABA neurotransmitter (gamma-Aminobutyric acid) in the presynaptic neurons and enhances its postsynaptic binding to its receptors. This increases the flow of chloride ions in the neurons, which causes hyperpolarization of the cell membranes. This on its turn disturbs normal nervous functions and causes a general blockage of the stimulus mechanisms in the CNS. The resulting cerebral and cortical deficits include mainly
    • Ataxia (uncoordinated movements)
    • Hypermetria (excessive or disproportionate movements)
    • Disorientation
    • Hyperesthesia (excessive reaction to tactile stimuli)
    • Tremor (uncoordinated trembling or shaking movements)
    • Mydriasis (dilatation of the pupils); in cattle and cats also myosis (contraction of the pupils)
    • Recumbency (inability to rise)
    • Depression
    • Blindness
    • Coma (persistence unconsciousness)
  • As a general rule, young animals are more sensitive to overdosing, react stronger and prognosis is worse than for adult animals.
  • Besides erroneous dosing, overdosing can occur due to excessive licking after pour-on delivery to livestock (usually licking of other animals in the same herd) or spot-on delivery to dogs and cats (particularly in cats due to intense grooming).
  • Frequent administration errors in livestock include intramuscular or intravenous instead of subcutaneous injection. This results in excessive blood levels. Another frequent error is repeated unintended treatment in short intervals due to animal mistaking.
  • A frequent administration error in dogs is partial administrating to small dogs of tablets or spot-ons approved for large animals.
  • A frequent administration error in cats is partial administration to cats of tablets or spot-ons approved only for dogs.
Poisoning Symptoms in Dogs
  • In dogs without the MDR-1 gene defect, the dominant poisoning symptom is extreme mydriasis (dilatation of the pupils) together with incomplete and deregulated pupillary reflex. Mydriasis in both eyes is the most sensitive indicator of ivermectin intoxication and the most frequent symptom in dogs.
  • At higher doses and in dogs with the MDR-1 gene defect other symptoms have been observed as well: weakness, lethargy, hypothermia (too low body temperature), hypersalivation (drooling), vomit, difficult breathing, behavioral disturbances, confusion, seizure, death.
  • Symptoms develop usually 5 to 24 hours after treatment and can last for several days until coma. As a general rule, poisoning is more serious and prognosis is worse if the symptoms develop faster.
Poisoning Symptoms in Cats
  • Poisoning symptoms in cats resemble those in dogs. Additional symptoms reported are diarrhea, anorexia (lack of appetite), posterior paralysis, disturbed or lacking reflexes.
  • As a general rule neurological symptoms in cats tend to recede in the days following poisoning and most cats recover within 2 to 4 weeks.
Poisoning Symptoms in Cattle
  • Most frequent symptoms in cattle are general depression of the CNS (Central Nervous System), including deafness and ataxia (uncoordinated movements).
  • Calves can show poisoning symptoms at doses only 3 x the therapeutic dose. They include ataxia (uncoordinated movements), hypermetria (excessive or disproportionate movements) and tremor (uncoordinated trembling or shaking movements). Colics have also been reported. Deaths cannot be excluded.
Poisoning Symptoms in Sheep, Swine, Goats and Horses
  • Those general symptoms previously described.
Birds
  • In birds intoxicated with ivermectin lethargy and anorexia (lack of appetite) have been reported.

Ivermectin Side Effects, Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs) and Warnings
  • Due to lack of data and the higher susceptibility in young animals it is advisable not to administer cattle and horses younger than 4 months, as well as puppies and kittens younger than 6 weeks.
  • Due to lack of date it is also advisable not to administer ivermectin to pregnant sows before the 40th day of gestation, and to pregnant mares before the 45th day of gestation.
  • After ivermectin injection a painful and rather large swelling may develop at the injection site. It usually recedes in a few days.
  • In horses, the risk of Chlostridium infection after injection is particularly high. If left untreated such infections are fatal. However it is not related to ivermectin, but to the use of contaminated needles. For this reason in most countries ivermectin for horses is usually available only as oral paste and not as an injectable.
  • In dogs and cats administration of spot-ons can cause a reversible skin irritation. Alopecia (hair loss) and squamation (appearance of skin scales) have also been reported.
  • Never use spot-ons or tablets for dogs on cats, and never use spot-ons or tablets for large dogs on small dogs. It happens that some users want to save money buying large tablets or spot-ons for treating smaller dogs (or even cats!) twice or more times. The risk of overdosing is considerable, either due to erroneous calculations or to unskilled manipulation. In addition, dog medicines may sometimes contain ingredients that are toxic to cats.


  • . The breeds more affected by this mutation are (% frequency): Collie (70%), Long-haired Whippet (65%), Australian Shepherd (50%, also mini), McNab (30%), Silken Windhound (30%), English Shepherd (15%), Shetland Sheepdog (15%), English Shepherd (15%), German Shepherd (10%), Herding Breed Cross (10%). Other less affected breeds are: Old English Sheepdog, Border Collie, Berger Blanc Suisse, Bobtail, Wäller. The only way to be sure that a dog is affected or not is to test for it. As more dogs are tested it is likely that the mutation is discovered in other breeds, or that the frequencies change.
  • Complications in dogs, cats and horses due to Dirofilariasis
    • Most products with ivermectin and other macrocyclic lactones are effective against heartworm larvae in the blood. Heartworm infection (Dirofilaria spp) is a common disease in dogs in regions with hot or mild weather. The disease is called dirofilariasis and is transmitted by mosquitoes. It is less frequent in cold regions but can occur there as well. Cats and horses can be affected too. Heartworm preventatives hinder larvae (microfilariae) in the pet's blood to develop to adult worms. The sudden death of microfilariae releases enormous amounts of allergens that can cause an allergic shock. The following symptoms may develop about 5 hours after treatment: pale mucosae, tachypnea (rapid breathing), dispnea (difficult breathing), vomit, weak and accelerated pulse, weakness, fever and ataxia (uncoordinated movements). Therapy requires shock treatment, including administration of corticosteroids and fluid supply.
    • Another possible complication is that treatment at the therapeutic dose against microfilariae can also kill some adult worms, if not all. Now, dead adult worms or their rests in the heart or in the pulmonary artery can physically obstruct the pulmonary blood vessels with the consequent damage to the lungs, which can be fatal. This means that any dog that is treated with a macrocyclic lactone should be checked for already existing heartworm infection. If the check is positive, the heartworm infection has to be treated with other specific heartworm products under strict supervision of a veterinary doctor.
  • It has been reported that off-label administration of micellar formulations of ivermectin can cause anaphylactic reactions in dogs. Ivermectin is not the cause of such reactions but polysorbate 80 (= Tween 80) one of the formulation ingredients.
  • In horses, allergic reactions with ventral midline pruritus (=itching) and edema (swelling) are often reported. They are mostly due to the sudden death of microfilariae of Onchocerca spp after treatment. Left untreated swelling recedes in 5 to 10 days and itching in about 3 weeks.
  • Unless prescribed by a veterinary doctor, never use on dogs or cats products for livestock that are not explicitly approved for such use. There is a high risk of overdosing or of adverse drug reactions due to ingredients that are not tolerated by pets or are even toxic to them.
Antidote and Treatment of Ivermectin Intoxication
  • There is no antidote for ivermectin poisoning.
  • Treatment consists in supportive and symptomatic measures.
  • Most patients recover in 7 to 10 days, but recovery of comatose patients usually needs longer.
Possible measures for dogs (application to other animals is left at the discretion of the veterinary doctor)
  • Administration of supplemental electrolytic solutions (intravenously if required)
  • Keeping the animals warm
  • Frequent turning of recumbent patients
  • Corneal protection with adequate ocular ointment
  • Artificial feeding (intravenous or with feeding tube)
  • Mechanical respiration in case of severe breathing disturbance.
  • If intoxication followed oral administration induce vomiting, gastric lavage, and charcoal administration are often indicated.
  • In case of bradycardia (low resting heart rate) administration of glycopyrrolate (0,01 mg/kg s.c.). Glycopyrrolate is a muscarinic antagonist. It is preferred over atropine because it does not cross the blood-brain barrier.
  • Physostigmine improves the condition of affected dogs very quickly, already 1 minute after injection of 1 mg. It is a reversible acetylcholinestrase inhibitor but is not an ivermectin antidote and must not be the only measure for treating ivermectin intoxication.
Pharmacokinetics of Ivermectin

Edited for length... see the article for the rest of the details.
Written by P. JunqueraLast Updated: July 08 2021




©

Interesting you'd mention this, about ANIMAL rare gene mutations that make Ivermectin deadly to animals with that gene defect.

Last night on the news it became clear the MSM has now awakened to awareness that some HUMANS (those NASTY anti-vaxxers!) are turning to Ivermectin.

The FIRST thing they said about it was "it's a HORSE de-wormer!"---failing to mention its other medical uses in humans.

SECOND thing they said about it was that for some humans with certain "rare auto-immune genetic conditions" the administration of Ivermectin was fatal.

They didn't--of course--say WHAT those "rare auto-immune genetic conditions" in humans, WERE.

Would you happen to know, Paul Bunyan? Or anyone?

thanks in advance!
 

paul bunyan

Frostbite Falls, Minnesota
Who would have thunk that Mississippi would go full retard on Ivermectin usage......hahahahah YOU ARE NOT a Cow or a horse, with a few exceptions. Easy boy, Dobbin.
 

paul bunyan

Frostbite Falls, Minnesota
Interesting you'd mention this, about ANIMAL rare gene mutations that make Ivermectin deadly to animals with that gene defect.

Last night on the news it became clear the MSM has now awakened to awareness that some HUMANS (those NASTY anti-vaxxers!) are turning to Ivermectin.

The FIRST thing they said about it was "it's a HORSE de-wormer!"---failing to mention its other medical uses in humans.

SECOND thing they said about it was that for some humans with certain "rare auto-immune genetic conditions" the administration of Ivermectin was fatal.

They didn't--of course--say WHAT those "rare auto-immune genetic conditions" in humans, WERE.

Would you happen to know, Paul Bunyan? Or anyone?

thanks in advance!
sorry for the late reply... I am not aware of any genetic mutation, in humans, that causes death if patient is treated with Ivermectin.

Please refer to the World Health Organizations list of critical drugs needed for humans...
you will see....wait for it....Ivermectin

this is not medical advice, I am not a Doctor
 

CathyC

Senior Member
What doses have you been taking? If the standard 1 mg/110#, there shouldn't be any problem continuing for a few more days. We discontinued it when the fever broke and stayed down for 24 hours.

Summerthyme
What doses have you been taking? If the standard 1 mg/110#, there shouldn't be any problem continuing for a few more days. We discontinued it when the fever broke and stayed down for 24 hours.

Summerthyme
I thought it was only supposed to be taken once weekly. Or is that only if you don’t have an active case?
 

WTSR

Veteran Member
All Day Chemist is charging $1.80 USD per tablet !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Bad price gouging.... best stick to Veterinary drug sources, Farm and feed stores...
I am currently out of the US in Asia and I can purchase a box of Ivermectin Qty 20 of 6 mg tablets without a perscription for about $1.20 each BOX.

IT is sold under the name Scabo 6.


Dosage & Administration

For Treatment (If COVIO Positive): 2 Tablets of Ivermectin 6 mg once daily for 5 days. (2+0+0 for 5 days).
For Prophylaxis: Single-dose as mentioned below to be taken on Day 1 & same dose on Day 7.
  • Body Weight 15-24 kg: 1 Tablet of Ivermectin 3 mg
  • Body Weight 25-35 kg: 1 Tablet of Ivermectin 6 mg
  • Body Weight 36-50 kg: 1 Tablet of Ivermectin 6 mg + 1 Tablet of Ivermectin 3 mg
  • Body Weight 51-65 kg: 2 Tablets of Ivermectin 6 mg
  • Body Weight 66-79 kg: 2 Tablets of Ivermectin 6 mg + 1 Tablet of Ivermectin 3 mg
  • Body Weight >80 kg: 3 Tablets of Ivermectin 6 mg

Strongyloidiasis: The recommended dosage of Ivermectin for the treatment of strongyloidiasis is a single oral dose designed to provide approximately 200 mcg/kg of body weight. Patients should take tablets on an empty stomach with water. In general, additional doses are not necessary. However, follow-up stool examinations should be performed to verify eradication of infection.

Dosage Guidelines for Ivermectin for Strongyloidiasis:
  • Body Weight (kg) 15-24: Dose 3 mg/kg
  • Body Weight (kg) 25-35: Dose 6 mg/kg
  • Body Weight (kg) 36-50: Dose 9 mg/kg
  • Body Weight (kg) 51-65: Dose 12 mg/kg
  • Body Weight (kg) 66-79: Dose 15 mg/kg
  • Body Weight (kg) >80: Dose 200 mcg/kg
 

155 arty

Veteran Member
That's the 1st measurement on the horse paste injector type ivermectin, you would get 4 doses total out of one like that. I weigh 120, so I would get 8 doses out of one. When you open it up, you'll see how it works. Any other thing, I don't know.
ok I know this has been covered but, I have durvet apple horsey paste ,there is a 250 lb mark on the stem of the plunger if I weigh 250 that is what to go by if I was hypothetically taking it correct?
 

bw

Fringe Ranger
ok I know this has been covered but, I have durvet apple horsey paste ,there is a 250 lb mark on the stem of the plunger if I weigh 250 that is what to go by if I was hypothetically taking it correct?
Yes, but it's wildly incorrect. The first shove of the plunger may have a void in front of the paste, and the plunger isn't real accurate. If you want the correct dose, get a little electronic scale on Amazon and weigh it out. Half a gram per hundred lbs. Rest a spoon on the scale, zero it, and push the plunger to get your dose.
 

155 arty

Veteran Member
Yes, but it's wildly incorrect. The first shove of the plunger may have a void in front of the paste, and the plunger isn't real accurate. If you want the correct dose, get a little electronic scale on Amazon and weigh it out. Half a gram per hundred lbs. Rest a spoon on the scale, zero it, and push the plunger to get your dose.
just got exposed how many times a week
 

1911user

Veteran Member
Per FLCCC after exposure, take one heavy dose now and one heavy dose in 48 hours. A heavy dose is double or triple a normal dose. A normal dose is 0.2mg per Kg of body weight however that translates into the form of ivermectin you are planning to take.

Go to flccc to verify the latest protocol.
 

155 arty

Veteran Member
Per FLCCC after exposure, take one heavy dose now and one heavy dose in 48 hours. A heavy dose is double or triple a normal dose. A normal dose is 0.2mg per Kg of body weight however that translates into the form of ivermectin you are planning to take.

Go to flccc to verify the latest protocol.
thank you
 

Mary Contrary

Veteran Member
Liver enzymes and bilirubin are the biggies. Anyone who is taking anticlotting meds needs to watch their clotting times (prothrombin, etc). That is definitely something you'd want to discuss with your doctor...

Summerthyme
I take Mukta Vati which thins the blood too. So is it dangerous taking Ivermectin with it?
PB has dug up a lot of good reference material.

He agreed to not lock it yet.



Summerthyme's recommendations are conservative and cautious. Not a bad thing, IMO.



Everybody here should be digesting all the available info before making decisions.


My vet, who is an older and very pragmatic type, said of using ivermec for canine heartworm preventative..."Meh, you should be OK. It's hard to overdose with it". He said that knowing that I would apply a modicum of common sense.
I've been taking it once a month since Dec 2020. Will do twice a month now.
You tilt your head back and pour into your nose, or you use a squeeze bottle with a wide tapering nozzle that makes a nice seal with your nose. I recommend the squeeze bottle, but many people use a ceramic pot. If you use the squeeze bottle you can lean over a sink, put it on one nostril, and the water flows through and out the other nostril. Works great.

The reason for distilling everything is that there are bacteria that can infect your brain from your nose. Major danger in some river systems. Could be in your well or tap water, depending on where you are.
I bought a cheap one. Not bad. Gonna open and put in a drop of iodine.
Mary I don't like getting water in my nose when I go swimming but I can do nasal irrigation just fine.
It's not just "putting water up your nose"......that would not go well.

Nasal irrigation is done with a special solution that contains salt. When you have the proper solution, it does not hurt at all. Trust me. You can buy little packets at pharmacy/walmart to add to your water (for safety, always use distilled, or if you must use tap water, boil for at least 5 mins then cool)

If you don't want to buy the little salt packets, you make your own. I don't have a recipe handy but they are on the net. Just search for nasal rinse recipe. You will need to use either a neti pot or a Neil med bottle. I prefer the Neil med personally.
I will use the squeeze bottle then.
 
Top