INSANITY Why would SO MANY Japanese women dress and act like prepubescent schoolgirls

ainitfunny

Saved, to glorify God.
i am watching a lot of NHK JAPANESE Tv and it is unsettling to see grown women dress and act like a 10 year old child. They wear 1930's childrens styles. It is mostl⁹y confined to women under 30 and they even say "when I was in University"!

They had reporter dressed like that, like she was wearing a costume rather than clothes, to report on a train trip in Japan. it was a distraction from the story and the train engineer was obviously uncomfortable as she was supposed to be grown woman reporter.

it isn't sexy unless you are into fantasizing child sex. I think that should be kept in your bedroom. What woman would dress like that who hoped to find A normal male boyfriend?

it is over represented in people who have any connection to "ART" but is a style a lot of ordinary young women affect after work. It goes along with a tortured outlook of poor me, i'm so lonely, nobody sees me. They depict themselves crying bloody tears, they call it "anime."

i see so many who have never suffered ANYTHING wanting to magnify every little emotional "boo boo" they have ever had so they can say they were bullied, or unloved, or discriminated agaInst. i guess you aren't anybody unless you are one of the oppressed.

I am just tired of it. Not of REAL suffering, but the kind that is an affectation like the ragged jeans you pay $90. for to go with the homeless look.
 
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ainitfunny

Saved, to glorify God.
I was wrong, it is a culture called Kawaii.


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Kawaii


Not to be confused with Hawaii, Kauai, Kawaiisu, or Kawai.
Kawaii (Japanese: かわいい or 可愛い, IPA: [kaɰaiꜜi]; 'lovely', 'loveable', 'cute', or 'adorable')[1] is the culture of cuteness in Japan.[2][3][4] It can refer to items, humans and non-humans that are charming, vulnerable, shy, and childlike.[2] Examples include cute handwriting, certain genres of manga, and characters including Hello Kitty and Pikachu.[5][6]
Silver roadside fence with clean, well-maintained pink bunny-shaped posts for support


Clockwise from top left: a temporary guard rail in Narita, Chiba Prefecture; Hello Kitty on a sign in Ikebukuro, Tokyo; a shelf of decorated tea kettles
The cuteness culture, or kawaii aesthetic, has become a prominent aspect of Japanese popular culture, entertainment, clothing, food, toys, personal appearance, and mannerisms.[7]

Etymology

History

Aesthetics

Influence upon other cultures

Controversy

See also

References

Further reading


Last edited 1 month ago by Meters


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China Connection

TB Fanatic
https://content.ngv.vic.gov.au/col-images/api/Cf103082/1920
26 FEB 20
Moga: the audacity of being a modern girl
By Mariko Nagai
Japan in 1920s and 1930s was a time when traditional art and aesthetics merged with European life and culture. The result was a pulsating era of Japanese modernism and the creation of Asian Art Deco architecture, paintings, prints, design and fashion. Investigating the socially liberated status of young Japanese women known as moga (modern girls), a 2020 exhibition at NGV, Japanese Modernism, included two major works by young contemporary female creators of the era. These women changed tradition by seeking financial and emotional independence and adopting Western fashion styles and behaviours.
They cut their long black hair, symbolic of a traditional Japanese woman’s beauty. They removed their conservative kimonos, the very clothes that defined the upper class, and put on vibrant kimono designs and Western dresses that gave lightness to their steps. These girls took it all in and made it all their own: bobbed hair, knee-length dresses, stockings, painted eyebrows and dark rouge. All of the things their mothers would disapprove of and maybe, they thought, all the things that some boys would frown upon, but who cared about those boys anyway?

In the 1930s, they strutted down the streets of Tokyo, Osaka and Kobe, arm in arm, without chaperones, defiantly, boldly, as if they owned the streets – no, they owned the entire city and its future. They flirted with boys and men and sometimes other girls, they ignored hisses from the old, they danced and danced until their feet hurt in their pumps, but they could have danced even more if they hadn’t had to go to work the next day. They drank. They smoked. They held on tight to boys, swaying their bodies languidly to the music. The media loved to hate them, calling them ‘loose’ and ‘immoral’ and ‘independent’.

A modern girl, moga, laughed at people bound to tradition; she laughed at conventions and modesty; she laughed at being bound to men (like their mothers and some of their friends were), working from sunrise to sunset, all for their families. This was the time of the Taisho and early Showa democracy; a liberalism movement coinciding with the reign of Emperor Taisho between 1912 and 1926, and the young Emperor Showa up to the late 1930s. Following the Russo-Japanese War of 1904 and 1905, and after the First World War of 1914 to 1918, Japan became an international entity rivalling the West. Just as Japan was audacious, so were these girls.

Japan during the interwar period was a complicated space where modernity clashed with the deeply rooted Ie seido (the ideal Japanese family structure, as determined by law). Moga girls walked the sunny streets of Ginza in Tokyo, while factory girls in Gunma and Nagano worked ten-hour shifts reeling silk in humid windowless factory rooms for the good of the nation, their fingers red and senseless from scalding water. It was also a time when politicians lived in fear of assassination attempts, when anarchists and socialists shared the same temporal and intellectual space with nationalists and imperialists, and when Tokyo lay in waste from the Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923 and, as quickly as the city was destroyed, began to rebuild itself with buildings seemingly reappearing overnight.

From this landscape emerged Taniguchi Fumie, a young artist, creator of the work Preparing to go out (Yosoou hitobito), 1935. Taniguchi was a graduate of the prestigious Joshibi University of Art and Design, Tokyo, an all-female art school established in 1900 that sought ‘to empower the self-reliance of women through the arts’ and ‘to improve the social status of women’.1 In some sense, Joshibi encouraged girls to be bad, to have agency over themselves. Taniguchi was a rising star, collecting major art awards in the 1930s, becoming somewhat of a darling of the art world. Her other works from this period, such as Farming woman, 1932; Inside the car, 1933; and Obi, 1935 (private collection), also feature empowered women (though not necessarily moga), who often stand, their eyes averted to something outside of the frame, as if they are looking at their possible future, readying themselves for the next movement. In the artist’s own words:
Girls I know who are so full of life and so masculine; they’ve all spurned the outdated common-sense and try to live their lives in a new way … [They are] unique artists born out of the fearful time period of today.2
In Preparing to go out, Taniguchi presents six moga girls, four of them standing and two sitting. They are full of life and are not dictated by the male gaze, but by their own stance, as if to say, ‘This is who we are. We are audacious. We are artists of our own lives’. There is no artificiality in their postures. They are in repose. They are there. Simple as that. This is also reflected in Negishi Ayako’s work Waiting for makeup, 1938, which was acquired through the generous support of Jennifer and Brian Tymms. The work on paper features two young women dressed in Western-style clothing and sporting popular 1930s hairstyles made famous by French hair stylist, Marcel Grateau. Taniguchi and Negishi completed these works during a time when Japan, and the rest of the world, were becoming increasingly nationalistic and militaristic. In 1938, the Japanese government would encourage women to wear kokubo-fuku (national uniform), meaning that luxuriant women’s fashions were replaced with more functional clothing in line with an increasing nationalistic culture of austerity. Kimonos with bright colours of light yellow, pink and blue, and created from luxurious fabrics such as silk and laces would appear less frequently on the streets, as Japan became increasingly involved in a war in China. Women’s lives were no longer theirs but part of the nation, intimately bound to the war effort.

In a few years’ time, the moga parties, independence, agency, defiance, art and uniqueness would all but disappear. Taniguchi, herself, would be taken by nationalistic fever, founding the Women Artists’ Volunteer Corps (Joryu Bijutsuka Houkoutai) in 1943, her works – and other artist’s works such as Léonard Tsuguharu Foujita – reflecting the militarism of the time. Though she tried to regain her artistic fame after the war, it never reached the brilliance of the interwar period, and when she divorced her husband and moved to the US to remarry to a Japanese-American man in 1955, she disappeared from the art world altogether.3 Moga, like Fumie herself, emerged from a particular landscape of a historical moment, and then disappeared. For now, though, here they are: women as the subjects of their own lives, fully themselves.
Mariko Nagai is a Japanese-born poet and author. This article was originally commissioned for and published in the Jan–Feb 2020 issue of NGV Magazine.
Notes
1
Joshibi University of Art and Design, Joshibi University of Art and Design, www.joshibi.ac.jp/english, accessed 29 Nov. 2019.
2
Taniguchi Fumie, ‘About women’s beauty’, Kuni, 14 Mar. 1938, pp. 42–3.
3
Megumi Kitahara, ‘Modern to Dento ni Ikita Nihongaka Taniguchi Fumiko’ (‘Living Between Modernity and Tradition: Fumie Taniguchi, a Japanese Painter (1910–2001)’), Machikaneyamaronso, Osaka University, 48 Mar. 2015, pp. 1–25.

 

ainitfunny

Saved, to glorify God.
there wasnt anything sexy in what they were showing, but i did learn the look is called "Lolita" and gothic Lolita for the 1800's styles. The reporter was wearing something like this and had the pig tails too. a grown woman college grad.
71Pe6jf7oAL._AC_UY1000_.jpg
 

Magdalen

Veteran Member
I have a friend who designs clothing for the EGL (elegant Gothic Lolita) community (Yes, I have a varied collection of friends.) I think she once said that it has been suggested that the whole mouthless, nose-less "cute" design element (Think Hello Kitty) overlay in Japanese culture may have its roots in the culture wide unresolved emotional response to the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. It's an interesting idea.
 

TidesofTruth

Veteran Member
Don't know why but asian women of any kind were never appealing to me anyway. In fact I am very vanilla in what I find attractive. Don't know why but can't help it.
 

Masterchief117

I'm all about the doom
Kawaii culture. I watch NHK World some too. One of my favorite music groups is a Kawaii Metal group. Japan can be very weird yet beautiful. I want to go visit there, hopefully after this virus shit is calmed down and the world hasn't imploded.
 

FaithfulSkeptic

Carrying the mantle of doubt
i am watching a lot of NHK JAPANESE Tv and it is unsettling to see grown women dress and act like a 10 year old child. They wear 1930's childrens styles. It is mostl⁹y confined to women under 30 and they even say "when I was in University"!

They had reporter dressed like that, like she was wearing a costume rather than clothes, to report on a train trip in Japan. it was a distraction from the story and the train engineer was obviously uncomfortable as she was supposed to be grown woman reporter.

it isn't sexy unless you are into fantasizing child sex. I think that should be kept in your bedroom. What woman would dress like that who hoped to find A normal male boyfriend?

it is over represented in people who have any connection to "ART" but is a style a lot of ordinary young women affect after work. It goes along with a tortured outlook of poor me, i'm so lonely, nobody sees me. They depict themselves crying bloody tears, they call it "anime."

i see so many who have never suffered ANYTHING wanting to magnify every little emotional "boo boo" they have ever had so they can say they were bullied, or unloved, or discriminated agaInst. i guess you aren't anybody unless you are one of the oppressed.

I am just tired of it. Not of REAL suffering, but the kind that is an affectation like the ragged jeans you pay $90. for to go with the homeless look.
I think people who have imagination, can think for themselves, and generally have a rational mind have neither the need nor desire to have others notice them. Irrational lemmings, on the other hand, feel the need for more attention to compensate for their deficiencies. Either that or money means more to them than self respect.
 

Dystonic

Contributing Member
Japan has strange laws regarding sex. The official age of consent is 13, but it breaks down into categories such as a 13-14 year old ok with only another 13-14 year old. But that’s ignored a lot from what I have read. Their is a lot more craziness you can find with them in a five minute google search.

I remember reading they had a young consent law back when their was an uproar about Mexico changing the age of consent to 12. That really shed light on human trafficking from Mexico. I never thought how much I probably saw in a week and didn’t realize it as prostitutes have never been on my danger radar.
 

Faroe

Un-spun
there wasnt anything sexy in what they were showing, but i did learn the look is called "Lolita" and gothic Lolita for the 1800's styles. The reporter was wearing something like this and had the pig tails too. a grown woman college grad.
View attachment 280510
Yeah, but as someone else pointed out, we've got Miley, and that wet ass pussy singer. If this is the best Japan can do in the race for degeneracy, they've got some catching up to do. I've seen documentaries on the penis festival. It is remarkably sedate, nothing like our gay pride parades, and is a traditional celebration of fertility. Japan IS different.

Recently ran into a bunch of academic bs on our Western Cottage Core aesthetic, and the above pic is close to the look of gal lecturing her YT audience about the subtilities of that (just incase any of her viewers should get a key detail wrong?). I'll try to find the video. Came up on a feed with Abby Cox (women's clothing historian, who tends to get on my nerves with know-it-all over analysis and Woke). Same pinafore, babydoll type ruffles, and braids (dyed pink).

I guess my point is - plenty of grown, graduate Western women roaming around here in weird get-ups, we are just accustomed, and don't really notice it.

(eta - apologies for the spelling. Have to be somewhere, and don't have time to Google and get back to insert all the corrections.)

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5odKiL7jRW0

I may be missing some key points here... just don't get it, but here is one woman's synopsis on cottage core. There is also the related "dark academia" style, and stuff inbetween, too. Whatever. Run time is about half an hour. Listened to this a few months ago. Relates to nostalgia. The original Cox video on victorian dress might be a better place to start, for an historical context. Will try to get back to this later - am late for leaving the house.
 
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Millwright

Knuckle Dragger
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