Misc Who else is working on yarn projects to pass the Coronavirus shut-in time?

TerriHaute

Hoosier Gardener
One of my granddaughters has a birthday coming up at the end of the month and I realized that I might not get a chance to buy her a birthday gift, so I looked around online for a crochet pattern of something to make her. I settled on this dragon pattern. I think she'll like it and I can make it with yarn I have on hand but the colors will be different. Anyone else keeping busy this way?

 

Martinhouse

Veteran Member
Me, too. Still working on a plain shawl that unfortunately will probably be finished some time in June or July.

It is very plain. Just seed stitch for thickness, couple feet wide but will be five or six feet long. No fringe or fancy edges, just a narrow row of cuff on both ends. It's strictly utility but it's sort of a fern green and I really like how it looks!
 

PJM

Contributing Member
Me, too. Still working on a plain shawl that unfortunately will probably be finished some time in June or July.

It is very plain. Just seed stitch for thickness, couple feet wide but will be five or six feet long. No fringe or fancy edges, just a narrow row of cuff on both ends. It's strictly utility but it's sort of a fern green and I really like how it looks!
Seed stitch is one of my favourites, it is so tidy looking. I have one sock finished, but unfortunately the other one only has the cuff done. I have to put down the mouse and get it finished.

The dragon looks great, too. My mom used to make those knitted guys. Her penguin was always a hit.
 

Faroe

Veteran Member
Working on a triangle neck wrap in garter stitch. I'll be done when the yarn runs out. Works well for pod casts that require some attention, as it's totally mindless. Have a diamond lace shawl in the works, but that one requires full focus - lots of counting. Haven't felt like working on it for the last few days. A big cone of Falmouth Blue Frangipani gansey yarn is due to arrive tomorrow. Haven't decided exactly what I'll do with that yet.
 

Martinhouse

Veteran Member
Faroe, I also knit during podcasts that don't require any visual attention. Particularly Chris Martenson's since he reads aloud most of what he presents on the screen.

I still can manage only about eight rows at most, before my shoulders and neck tell me it's time to stop. Right now I've finished 18" and I figure that's about a quarter of the shawl. It's only 101 stitches wide and if that ends up stretching and narrowing, I'll just knit on a band along either side, possibly in the matching variegated yarn, next fall when the gardening is finished.

If I'd been able and inclined to, I could have been half done by now instead of one-fourth.
 
Last edited:

AlaskaSue

North to the Future
I'm attempting my first lace shawl...I love the color and the fine yarn is very soft, but not too fuzzy to work with. I wear shawls a lot at home and visiting because I live in a cold place and I love them...but you should see my scarf collection. I think I'm up to 30 now (not all made by me, I have talented friends!). But I'm looking at the fabric stash and about to hop over to the sewing machine for a bit.....many projects, many gifts to make :)
 

Martinhouse

Veteran Member
I've actually picked up the shawl and done more knitting the last few days. It is a little over 24 inches long now and I just tied on the yarn from the second 7 0z. skein and knitted one row. I'll wait until I've done a few rows before I pick out the knot and pull the ends of the join into the knitting to hide them. I actually ran out at the end of a row with about two inches of yarn left over.
 

Faroe

Veteran Member
Faroe, I also knit during podcasts that don't require any visual attention. Particularly Chris Martenson's since he reads aloud most of what he presents on the screen.

I still can manage only about eight rows at most, before my shoulders and neck tell me it's time to stop. Right now I've finished 18" and I figure that's about a quarter of the shawl. It's only 101 stitches wide and if that ends up stretching and narrowing, I'll just knit on a band along either side, possibly in the matching variegated yarn, next fall when the gardening is finished.

If I'd been able and inclined to, I could have been half done by now instead of one-fourth.
There is a guy (can't remember his name) who is both a physical therapist and a knitter. He has a website, and a published book. Might be helpful. Look up something like, "ergonomic knitting." Also, Portuguese knitting is used by some people who have pain issues. Very different technique, but traditional to Portugal and South America, and VERY fast. Blueprint/Craftsy has a couple of tutorials on it (paid, but you might find some tutorials on YT as well). I have also come across two books on Portugese knitting sold by Amazon.
 

Martinhouse

Veteran Member
Oh, Faroe! A physical therapist who knits is almost as remarkable as a big deal football player doing needlepoint! I can't remember the guy's name at the moment, but I saw him on Johnny Carson's late night show, with a sample of his needlepoint, more years ago than I care to imagine.
 

TerriHaute

Hoosier Gardener
Oh, Faroe! A physical therapist who knits is almost as remarkable as a big deal football player doing needlepoint! I can't remember the guy's name at the moment, but I saw him on Johnny Carson's late night show, with a sample of his needlepoint, more years ago than I care to imagine.
Rosey Grier
 

Martinhouse

Veteran Member
Roosevelt Grier!!!!! I thought that was the name but I just wasn't sure enough to say so! And I didn't know how to spell his last name. Hope I'm right about his first name.

He was really cool when I saw him on that show. And I may be remembering incorrectly, but I think it wasn't long into the interview before Carson lost the smart-alecky smirk and was regarding the talent a little more seriously.

Thanks, Terri!
 

Nana

Senior Member
Crocheting another afghan. Don't know what I'm going to do with them. Have given away about 25 of them and still have about 40 (haven't counted lately) left. Think I may be addicted? :)
 

Faroe

Veteran Member
Afghans turn up all the time in the local thrift shop, and also at yard sales around here. I kinda collect them. The price tends to be around $5, and I always feel like the pretty ones need *rescuing.* Don't ask, makes no sense. I would do the same for quilts, but most start at prices that are bit higher for my budget, and while old quilts usually need repair, those sweet acrylic afghans in cheery colors are quite sturdy. They make me happy.
 

Faroe

Veteran Member
Ok, so until the April stitching chat gets put up (not shirking, but Packy always does it, and I don't want to step on toes) I'll post here.

Had some yarn due to arrive today, per tracking. Hope it makes it here tomorrow.

Found a mistake a few inches down on the current shawl project, and haven't been motivated to rip it out. Normally, I'm not such a perfectionist on lace, but this problem is on the center spine yo's, and is very obvious. I also need about four more skeins ($10 each) for this project, and have to decide if I really want to commit to it and place an order.

I gave up on the pretty latice lace from the Lovick lace book. Nothing wrong with the pattern, clever actually how she put the charts together, and the integrated prairie point lace was nice to knit as you go rather than add on later (never happens - I end up delcaring "done," at that point.). But...it was tedious to knit, and I needed a firmer gage to show off the diamond lattice holes to good effect. Maybe I'll try that one again on smaller needles and with a more suitable yarn.

Was going through the stash, and FOUND a pretty lace fischou triangle I made maybe 2? years ago in some gorgeous heritage breed Hebrides lace weight. Only one skein was available, and I ended up binding off when the skein was done. Cat's paw sort of pattern, and IIRC, I worked out the stitch count myself to do it on point. This size will warm a neck nicely if the ends are wrapped and tied, so I'm going to block it.
 

packyderms_wife

Neither here nor there.
One of my granddaughters has a birthday coming up at the end of the month and I realized that I might not get a chance to buy her a birthday gift, so I looked around online for a crochet pattern of something to make her. I settled on this dragon pattern. I think she'll like it and I can make it with yarn I have on hand but the colors will be different. Anyone else keeping busy this way?

O how my this is so stinking cute!
 

packyderms_wife

Neither here nor there.
I’m getting ready for two solo shows I have this year, I’m making sixty new works, and that’ll be it for 5he year because I’m also working on improving my leather working and metal smithing skills. I’m also making a dozen or so handmade books/journals for my shop.
 

Faroe

Veteran Member
On a totally unrelated note...
Dogs just got done barking up a storm. I heard voices, couldn't see anything, went back inside. BF went out, dogs get louder... Some conversation ensues...

Turns out the neighbors found a box of kittens at the abandoned adobe across the street from us.
Do we need a kitten? I think I need a kitten!
 

Faroe

Veteran Member
Ok, just to put this to rest, now.
I have indoor BIRDS. I can't get a kitten. What the heck was I thinking?
The family that took the box of kittens has four kids (homeschooled), dogs, they are nice people - I think they will do right by the kittens.
We really can't take one.
 

summerthyme

Administrator
_______________
I dunno... cats *can* be trained to ignore and get along with birds...

But only you know if you want any more (even minor) chaos in your life. I understand either way. We succumbed to the insanity of a winter Border Collie pup, and half the time, we've wondered what in hell we were thinking! She completely destroyed the wiring on my plant shelf unit (hubby rewired one tray for me, but I really think I need to start more plants this year... sigh). She also chewed the cord off my expensive 4 flat heat mat... hubby blessedly spliced a new cord on it... my delinquent pepper seeds sprouted within 36 hours of its repair.

She also has been the hardest pup we've ever had to housetrain... but she's smarter than hell, has learned basic obedience commands (at 17 weeks) and has more herd instinct than I've *ever* seen in a dog. My free range chickens are herded into nice, tight flocks multiple times a day, then she splits one off and pushes it away, then herds it back to the flock... all using perfect Border Collie form, and without ever barking or even threatening to nip. OTOH, she torments the two older dogs until Prince gets pissed off and drags her around by the head... usually through the deepest mud puddle he can find! Both hubby and I are sick of giving two dogs milkhouse showers every evening.

But I've laughed more this winter than I have in years. I tried to put her in the outside cellar entrance the other day... she was wet from her latest necessary shower, but it was chilly... I figured she could dry off some in the basement rather than soaking the house floors. The older dogs go down automatically when I say "cellar", but she fell down the stairs as a small pup, and doesn't like them now. (She has no problem with the other cellar stairs, or the haymow stairs, though)

Anyway, I tried to put her in, and she somehow got all four paws braced against the open door and the door frame. When I got her pried loose from that, she wrapped all four paws around my leg and hung on. By that time, I was laughing so hard I could hardly stand. I finally convinced her to get in on the landing and shut the door. When hubby came in from chores, she happily followed him down the stsirs!

I think I'm seeing a big reason why I've gotten no sewing done this winter!

Summerthyme
 

Faroe

Veteran Member
The Net Loft yarn order arrived today from Alaska. Very pretty greyish blue cone of Frangipani (NL's proprietary color). They also sent their complimentary gansey package (which I had forgotten to request in the order). Comes with a gansey book, some extra instructions, a pin, and a canvas drawstring tote. Beautifully packaged. Started reading the book. I have several books on ganseys, and this one has historical information I haven't come across previously.

Very pleased with it.
Y'all should order some gansey yarn!
 

Faroe

Veteran Member
Another update: Ripped out, fixed the error, and now OUT of blue yarn for the shawl. Ordered 4 more skeins, so that is taken care of. I think it will be pretty, and it's my own pattern, as simple as can be, and sort of a design-as-you-go, but still mine, still technically lace.

Looking at a Gladys Thompson sweater for a gansey for myself, and started swatching. Am using the same Norwegian Rauma Finnulgarn that is in the blue shawl (grey, here). I'll see how the stitch texture works in it, as this stuff is more woollen spun than worsted, and much lighter and fluffier than the very dense 5ply Frangipani. NOT interested in knitting North Atlantic storm gear as we head into a South-west summer, BUT I want my own traditional gansey. Finnulgarn is a suitable fingering weight, comes in gorgeous heathered shades, and is (more or less) affordable. $9.98 for 50g at 175 meters.

I would happily learn more sweater structures using inexpensive WalMart Lion Brand, just to get a better understanding of them. But apparently not available now, even if I bothered to get over there (next town, 20 min drive) Oddly, I can knit a sweater, but I can never remember later HOW I knit it, so am ALWAYS intimidated by the prospect of another, even if the elements are the same as the last one. BBR gave a pattern for a tiny gansey in her book. I've knit it twice (successfully), and still wonder about those shoulders.... Anyway, she has tantalizingly shown other tiny sweaters in other traditional structures on the Fruity Knitting podcast, but has nothing for these on her site. If she, or someone of her caliber writes a book on them, I will buy it. Liz Lovick has a similar sort of book for tiny shawls. I don't own (yet) that particular book, but she has a few good examples in another lace book that I do frequently refer to.
 
Last edited:

IRoberge

Veteran Member
I'm considered essential so still working, but now we are reduced staff in each branch so I only have to work 2 days this coming week. Decided a new pair of socks needed to be knit. Started yesterday and now working the heel on sock one.
 
Last edited:

Faroe

Veteran Member
Waiting on yarn and needles scheduled to be delivered on Monday. I have been busy swatching for my own gansey, and also charting it on graph paper. I don't want any unwelcome surprises for details I assume are worked out in my own head, only to make a mess of it on a 288+ stitch round. Swatch has yet to be washed and blocked, but so far, gage is 6 1/2 to 7 stitches to the inch, and I'd like something rather loose and boxy. Should probably order a second cone.

Was enjoying a very short Kammebornia video yesterday (Sophia doesn't seem to be translating them into English subtitles any more. :( ), and she was stitching together simple wool granny squares. Just so pretty. I want to start doing this, as I work a lot with Rauma Finnulgarn, and have started accumulating odds and ends of various colors. My crochet hook collection is pretty sparce, but I am going to try this fingering weight (50g, 175m) with a F/5-3.75mm hook.
 

Faroe

Veteran Member
A couple of months ago, I made a few granny squares out some leftover Marie Wallin fairisle kit yarn - the kit was a small project (fingerless mitts), came with full skeins and lots of colors, so a big basket of that yarn remains. My *granny* squares turned out very small, about 2" across, which was too small for me to want to make a blanket out of them.

Checked some videos, and I was doing it wrong. Yeah, I am THAT rusty. Can't even make a granny square w/o a tutorial! Anyway, life goes on with DOUBLE crochet (or what the Brits. call treble?...whatever.), and now, I have several squares that are between 3 1/2 and 3 3/4 inches on the side. That will do. Wallin uses Jamieson's Shetland (not to be confused with Jammieson & Smith Shetland - two different companies, and I got the impression many years ago that they maybe don't don't get along?) and it (Jamieson's) is not particularly soft (like J&S), so is a good match with the Rauma.

Also, crochet has always cramped my hands. I like the results, but have always hated the uncomfortable process. Turns out, you can hold the yarn differently. I now tension the yarn in the left hand the same way as for knitting, and the hook is much more comfortable to me held across the palm (Arne does it that way), instead of before, like a pencil. So, no more cramping. Good.

Totally mindless, and like hexies, kind of addictive. My workspace is still swamped with hexies of all sizes, loose, and sometimes sewn together. I guess, a blizzard of crochet granny squares really won't make things all THAT much more cluttered. I know myself better than to actually expect a FINISHED afghan.
 

Shep

Contributing Member
Working on a pair of socks using its and bits of sock yarn. It’s taking forever but they’ll be colorful!
 

JMG91

Senior Member
Just finished my first knitting project the other day: a baby blanket for my son. I also managed to start a baby hat yesterday and finished it today. Whoo hoo! :eleph:
 

Faroe

Veteran Member
I'm in the middle of four Blueprint/Craftsy classes: crochet, double knitting, Bavarian knitting, and entrelac. Wish the new yarn order would arrive, because I've used most of my scrap. Also, I make several granny squares per day...keeps me from chewing my nails down to the quick. (Ok, whom am I kidding? But, I need to grow them back. Hate bit nails, its gross.)

Washed and blocked a single granny square this morning (is that even a *thing*?) I'm pretty much down to an old cone of J&S Shetland. Beautiful yarn (and very economical), but it is wound with oil for machine knitting. The square looked stringey before it's soapy soak. Looked great once pinned on the board (still drying). I'm tempted to do this with all the squares before stitching them together.
 
Last edited:

Faroe

Veteran Member
Just finished my first knitting project the other day: a baby blanket for my son. I also managed to start a baby hat yesterday and finished it today. Whoo hoo! :eleph:
Congratulations!
You are well on your way. It is a rewarding hobby.
 

Martinhouse

Veteran Member
When getting ready to tie the third 7 ounce skein of yarn onto my shawl this morning, I discovered something really useful.

I always loosely roll my yarn into balls that I can set in a stainless steel bowl when I'm knitting with them. This is because it's too easy to stretch the yarn when pulling it directly out of the skein when knitting. I pull all the yarn out into a pile first, maybe into an old dishpan, but the skein keeps sliding off the table and also caving in and tangling when I get to about the last quarter of it. Putting a book on it to hold it down doesn't really work all that well, either.

This morning a random visualization just popped into my mind and when I checked, I found out that a 7 ounce skein fits exactly into an empty 48 ounce tomato juice can and will stand upright without tangling until only the last outer layer of yarn remains to be pulled out. I'll be doing this from now on with any skeins that will fit in a tomato juice can and for some of the very small skeins, I may even find smaller cans that would fit them.

I felt smug and pleased with myself for at least an hour, but now, of course, I'm back to my usual humble self. (: (:
 

Faroe

Veteran Member
When getting ready to tie the third 7 ounce skein of yarn onto my shawl this morning, I discovered something really useful.

I always loosely roll my yarn into balls that I can set in a stainless steel bowl when I'm knitting with them. This is because it's too easy to stretch the yarn when pulling it directly out of the skein when knitting. I pull all the yarn out into a pile first, maybe into an old dishpan, but the skein keeps sliding off the table and also caving in and tangling when I get to about the last quarter of it. Putting a book on it to hold it down doesn't really work all that well, either.

This morning a random visualization just popped into my mind and when I checked, I found out that a 7 ounce skein fits exactly into an empty 48 ounce tomato juice can and will stand upright without tangling until only the last outer layer of yarn remains to be pulled out. I'll be doing this from now on with any skeins that will fit in a tomato juice can and for some of the very small skeins, I may even find smaller cans that would fit them.

I felt smug and pleased with myself for at least an hour, but now, of course, I'm back to my usual humble self. (: (:
I use a heavy glass jar. However, I find the easiest situation is unwinding off a cone set on the floor, but most yarn doesn't come that way.

Some skeins work well as center pull, some work work better from the outside. I was using some cheap yarn recently - pretty colors, but if I had known, I would have put the skein on a ball winder. Could barely get through a granny w/o having to stop to deal with a knot in that damn stuff. Sometimes it is helpful to know what is inside. Once, I had a sweater's worth of yarn that was so bad, I threw it all out. Lesson learned. I purchase one skein and swatch. I will only make projects with yarns I know.

A lidded glass jar will also work to store projects put aside for a time. (I have several.) They are out, so I don't loose track of them (or the kneedles), and the yarn is safe from moths with the lid on. You can never have too many heavy glass jars around. I've seen (and done similar - try re-cycling a Tyvek mailer) canning jar setups with the metal canning ring screwed down over a disk of cardboard that has a slit to a center hole. That keeps the skein from pulling up and out, but you can also get the yarn out of the jar and off the disk easily. Pinterest has some tea-pot yarn holders. They look cute until you decide you want to get the yarn out of the teapot, and you don't want to break it off the knitting.

ETA: 21 ounces of yarn! That sounds like a BIG shawl. Happy knitting. :)
 
Last edited:

Martinhouse

Veteran Member
Faroe, a teapot yarn holder should have a lid that is two hinged parts which meet at the center. Like an old fashioned picnic hamper. There could still be a hole for the yarn, but the lid would open to remove the whole ball or skein of yarn.

I may end up using more than 21 ounces for this shawl. It won't be especially big but it's already getting heavy. And it's already keeping my lap nice and warm! This isn't pretty stitches with lacy openwork. It is solid seed stitch on size 8 needles. I may even add a truncated triangle to the center of one long side, to give me the triangle effect of a shawl that will keep my back warm down to my waistline.
 
Last edited:

Faroe

Veteran Member
Yes, just popped in with a lid like that it would work. The tea pots I saw were using the spout to deliver the yarn.

I love the free-form possibilities of shawls. You are done when you want to be done. I have one out of Icelandic Lopi that is huge and very heavy. The lace border Faroese is all encompassing too. Both were knitted on US8 - that is as big as my needle collection goes. I sleep with all my shawls, they are squishier than pillows, and the chihuahua nests in them for covers. The one I am currently knitting is freeform, and will be done either with this skein, or later, if I can locate another couple skeins in the same color. I really wanted to finish it with fringe, but not w/o more yarn. It needs about 2 more inches at the bottom for better proportion with the eyelet "lace" stripes. Haven't counted the stitches, but this is a top down, and I'd guess at least 300, but probably more, maybe by a lot. I can get a good speed in garter. The plain knitting is rhythmic, so I don't find the long rows boring.
 

packyderms_wife

Neither here nor there.
Today I'm doing mending some clothes for Orion Commander. I don't normally do this type of mending as these items are basically disposable but with everything that's going on, I find myself mending his skivvies this afternoon. :xpnd: They just don't make waistbands like they used to! :lol:
 
Ok, just to put this to rest, now.
I have indoor BIRDS. I can't get a kitten. What the heck was I thinking?
The family that took the box of kittens has four kids (homeschooled), dogs, they are nice people - I think they will do right by the kittens.
We really can't take one.
Snickers I have/and have had cats constantly along with birds. The smaller birds might be tempting but even though tempted my African grey has firmly cowed the cats. Matter of a fact he is the trickster meowing at them to come into his room and come close to the cage then "Chomp" his has either bitten the tip of the tail or a ear. I finally had to make a blockade to the room so door is open but cats too lazy to jump it. The kittens were the ones in danger! :lol:
 

Faroe

Veteran Member
Snickers I have/and have had cats constantly along with birds. The smaller birds might be tempting but even though tempted my African grey has firmly cowed the cats. Matter of a fact he is the trickster meowing at them to come into his room and come close to the cage then "Chomp" his has either bitten the tip of the tail or a ear. I finally had to make a blockade to the room so door is open but cats too lazy to jump it. The kittens were the ones in danger! :lol:
A grey is the ultimate bird. Must admire from afar, however; that is a commitment I can not make.

Currently enjoying the company of a canary and a white dove. I had budgies too for several years. The canary had a friend budgie named Esther. she passed away several months ago, and I nearly lost the canary along with her. That night, he was flying around looking for her, flew into the kitchen (were he never goes), hit his head on a shelf, and fell to the floor. Didn't act normally for days, and wouldn't roost in his normal spot. He gets along fine with the dove, but he always had a *thing* for Esther.
 
You right African Greys are a commitment! I have had my Yar since he was a couple of weeks old and he was 20 in March. When we moved here lake 16 yrs ago I had 7 birds, 6 cats, 2 dogs and wow 3 pregnant goats, (same) in sheep & cattle versions! Talk about never a quiet moment. He is a very OCD critter that's for sure.
 

HDC

Contributing Member
I have knitted two dickies for my husband and a cowl for myself while not being able to travel. I have also made and donated over 50 face mask. Knitting and sewing keeps my hands busy.
We have a 2 year old german shepherd that keeps us entertained.
 
Top