Misc What A Way To Go: ‘Krapp Strapp’ No. 1 Way For Wyo Outdoorsmen To Do No. 2, Inventor Says

MinnesotaSmith

TB Fanatic
Nice item to have in a bugout vehicle, as long as you're going somewhere there are at least occasional trees.


What A Way To Go: ‘Krapp Strapp’ No. 1 Way For Wyo Outdoorsmen To Do No. 2, Inventor Says


Krap-Strap-composite-11.10.22-1536x864.jpg


November 10, 2022
Wyoming Life/Wyoming outdoors/News


By Mark Heinz, Outdoors Reporter
Mark@CowboyStateDaily.com

Keith Lindsey said the inspiration for one of his best-selling products came to him while he was in the woods doing what bears are widely purported to do there.

“I was chasing a couple of lost cows in the woods and the urge came upon me, you know what I mean,” Lindsey, who lives near Jacksonville, Texas, told Cowboy State Daily. “And there I was, at 60 years old, hugging a tree with my knees hurting.”

After a lifetime of horseback riding and other strenuous activities, Lindsey said his joints weren’t what they used to be. And he knew that others must being going through the same pain while trying go about their necessary business in the outdoors.

He has a background in product development, so it seemed only logical to develop something to solve the dilemma of taking a deep-woods deuce.

Simple But Effective

Now 63, Lindsey is the founder of Air Boss Motion Decoys, an outdoors company in Jacksonville. The company specializes in hunting decoys, but one of its best-selling products is the “Krapp Strapp.” It’s a device that allows users to lean into a padded strap, thereby taking the weight off their joints while answering nature’s call.

He founded Air Boss Motion Decoys after retiring from a corporate career. So when following a basic urge led him to an esoteric inspiration in the woods that day, envisioning a simple, yet effective, design came naturally.

“The Krapp Strapp is available only by direct shipment from our website,” he said. “We probably move 50 a week.”

With a large number of outdoorsmen, hunters and campers in Wyoming, he said the Krapp Strapp has found its way into some Cowboy State backpacks.

“Yes, we’ve sold some to people in Wyoming,” he said. “Montana, Colorado, all of those places. The hikers love them up in that country.”

‘Tethered To A Tree With Your Pants Down’

When shown a photo of the Krapp Strapp, noted Wyoming outdoorsman Paul Ulrich agreed it would be great for older adventurers or other people with joint problems.

But he was incredulous about its practicality for younger, fit hunters trying to pack light in grizzly country.

“Reminds me of the scene with the goat in ‘Jurassic Park,’” Ulrich told Cowboy State Daily. “Nothing easier for a predator than a meal tethered to a tree with its pants down.”

Karl Brauneis, a retired forester from Lander, told Cowboy State Daily that he thought the Krapp Strapp’s design was ingenious, though he’ll probably stick to what nature provides.

“That’s too cool. Think I’ll steer around that one, though, in search for a good log,” he said.

That Dumping Cousin

Lindsey said he doesn’t mind that some people buy his product for laughs.

A significant number of customers are women, and not only because they must squat to do what men can do standing up in the outdoors, he said. They sometimes buy Krapp Strapps to chide the men they know.

“Everybody has that cousin who, every time you’re trying to go to do something, he’s gotta stop and take a dump,” Lindsey said. “Well, many of my women customers are buying a Krapp Strapp as a novelty gift for that cousin.”

The first run of Krapp Strapps had a pocket on only one side of the user’s end, he said. On his wife’s advice, and to make it more appealing to women, he’s since added pockets on both sides.

“The pocket is for your toilet paper, of course,” he said. “But women like to have those scented wet wipes and bacteria gel – the hand-cleaning supplies. So, now you have pockets on both sides for everything.”

Backing In To New Markets

Along with outdoors enthusiasts, he said people who work outside in remote places could also benefit from Krapp Strapps, so he’s hoping to grow sales in that market.

“If you see those road construction crews working way out there with miles between towns, you know they’ve got to take a dump somewhere,” he said. “I’d like to convince those guys to have a Krapp Strapp in every utility truck.”

What’s In A Name

Lindsey said it’s part of his company’s strategy to give products catchy names by switching out and doubling letters.

“So you’ve got the ‘K’ in Krapp and the ‘PP’, the double Ps,” he said. “Catchy names help people remember our products.”

He’s also proud that his products are 100% American made.

“We make everything ourselves, right here in Jacksonville,” he said. “We like to make things the right way, just like you folks in Wyoming do.”
 

WalknTrot

Veteran Member
Awe geez...somebody always trying to make a buck. People who weren't taught how to poop in the woods will fall for it.

Just lean your back against a tree. (See all the free trees in the pic?) No $$ exchanged & more or less the same physics.
 

West

Senior
I can usually find small deadfall limbs or small trees. Then sit back off the limb. Hard to explain, but it works for me.

Many camp sites I've made, the first thing is a nice spot to poop, or for the ladies to do both. 2 to 3inch thick limbs or deadfall, set so you also have side support.

Here's a short piece about pooping in the woods, think they touch on my technique but don't go into specifics about it. It can be done easy and quickly. Why a hatchet is a must to have in the woods.

View: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=WfBnUazF3ig

only a couple minutes run time.

Always bury your poop!
 

Millwright

Knuckle Dragger
_______________
REFORGER '84, had been out doing recoveries for 30+ hours.

Made it back to Battery HQ area, which had just moved to that location...the porta johns had not.

Things were getting pretty critical, asked the First Sgt. (we hated each other) when those facilities would arrive... he laughed and said to go find a tree.

I found one with a nice, comfy looking fork about 40' up...pushed it over with my tank retriever and got comfy in that fork.

He was pissed, but couldn't really do anything. :lol:
 

Publius

TB Fanatic
Heck I learned how make a hole in the ground with the Boy Scouts and even how to lash tougher a seat and make a bigger hole for group use.
 

WalknTrot

Veteran Member
Thing is, in the woods, you try not to have to go, but when you gotta go, ya gotta go now, and dinking around trimming branches, digging a hole, or strapping up a sling ain't really in the cards. You are lucky to take a couple seconds to find some leaves before the main event.
 

West

Senior
Thing is, in the woods, you try not to have to go, but when you gotta go, ya gotta go now, and dinking around trimming branches, digging a hole, or strapping up a sling ain't really in the cards. You are lucky to take a couple seconds to find some leaves before the main event.

On the hunts I did over years in familiar areas, the dead wood fall offers excellent spots. You gotta be able to read the dead fall. Sometimes I've used the same make shift dead wood for years. Only used a small hatchet to remove some bark and small limbs, so I can sit comfortably.

Yes when camping were there is no facilities, using a small axe some rope, building a make shift latrine takes me only about 15 minutes if there is deadfall nearby.
 

Millwright

Knuckle Dragger
_______________
Thing is, in the woods, you try not to have to go, but when you gotta go, ya gotta go now, and dinking around trimming branches, digging a hole, or strapping up a sling ain't really in the cards. You are lucky to take a couple seconds to find some leaves before the main event.

Ayup, just seconds between "Rut-Roh" and tearing the door off a deer stand.
 
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