Water Tap Water Issues

Voortrekker

Senior Member
I am a truck driver and I travel 47 or the lower 57 States. Whenever I need water for cofffee/tea, cooking and drinking I try to use the soda water fountain, which has become problematic because of corporate decisions.

Anyway, water stored in Nalgene gets black and green algae when sitting for more than a week, or so. I have treated my 40 oz. bottles with silver oxide and those are okay. My teeth brushing water gets algae. I must clean those bottles with bleach as dish washing liquids does not kill nor clean the algae.

Be cautious when using commercial and retail tap water, it is NOT TREATED. This includes the "hot water" for tea and instant dried foods. We drivers will use the ice machine and hot water when getting our water and the ice machine uses tap water as well.

Sent from my tablet, which is uncooperative for posting.
 

Infoscout

The Dude Abides
I use the water from my fridge which is filtered, in my Nalgene bottles, I have left them full for long periods of time in car and in fridge, I have not seen any kind of fungus or change in color.

what if you used a water filter on tap water to load your bottles?
 

kyrsyan

Veteran Member
I take filter water bottles with us if we are traveling. A sawyer filter if we are going to be gone long. Lessons learned from attending family reunions in various places with nasty water.
 

Ku Commando

Veteran Member
I am a truck driver....
"Junk silver" dimes.....will fit in most any plastic bottle opening.

Just toss in 5-10 coins and they'll keep that water safe for drinking

150 years ago, the earliest American Pioneers placed silver or copper coins in their drinking water as they trekked westward. The coins kept the water safe from bacteria and algae.

dimes.png
 

Illini Warrior

Has No Life - Lives on TB
I traveled extensively for decades domestically & internationally >>> quit using any local water for all purposes - there can be a problem with municipal water as eazy as someone's well water - bottled is the only sure thing out there - exception to the rule was hot coffee and even then I think there was a few incidents >>> it's not just bio contamination to worry about - municipal water treatment can be a problem all to itself ....
 

Voortrekker

Senior Member
Health and Fitness coaches have warned against men using bottler water because of the plastics components. Otherwise, I would have used only bottled water.
 

SAPPHIRE

Veteran Member
colloidal silver added to water helps prevent that yuck stale smell........we have a generator but I know it's sold in healthfood/supplement stores
 

nomifyle

Has No Life - Lives on TB
I use tap water for some cooking, although not all especially when making a soup, and we also use it to make coffee, but not tea.

God is good all the time

Judy
 

ivantherussian03

Veteran Member
"Junk silver" dimes.....will fit in most any plastic bottle opening.

Just toss in 5-10 coins and they'll keep that water safe for drinking

150 years ago, the earliest American Pioneers placed silver or copper coins in their drinking water as they trekked westward. The coins kept the water safe from bacteria and algae.

View attachment 250927
Can someone explain what the silver coins do in the water to preserve it?
 

Ku Commando

Veteran Member
Can someone explain what the silver coins do in the water to preserve it?
YES & NO

It just works without being dangerous.....a Gift from God for man to use.


From the NATIONAL LIBRARY of MEDICINE -- Silver as a disinfectant - PubMed

Silver as a Disinfectant

Abstract
Silver has been used as an antimicrobial for thousands of years. Over the past several decades, it has been introduced into numerous new venues such as in the treatment of water, in dietary supplements, in medical applications, and to produce antimicrobial coatings and products. Silver is often used as an alternative disinfectant in applications in which the use of traditional disinfectants such as chlorine may result in the formation of toxic by-products or cause corrosion of surfaces. Silver has also been demonstrated to produce a synergistic effect in combination with several other disinfectants.

Many mechanisms of the antibacterial effect of silver have been described, but its antiviral and antiprotozoal mechanisms are not well understood. Both microbial tolerance and resistance to silver have been reported; however, the effect of silver has been observed against a wide variety of microorganisms over a period of years. Further research is needed to determine the antimicrobial efficacy of silver in these new applications and the effects of its long-term usage.
 

summerthyme

Administrator
_______________
I'd go with at least a .999 silver coin or bar, but yes, it should kill any bacteria in the water. However, I haven't ever seen colloidal silver work on viruses or fungal infections... dunno if it will stop algae growth or not.

But it was a common trick before refrigeration to drop a silver dollar in the milk pitcher... it kept it ftom souring for a while longer.

Summerthyme
 
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