HEALTH Staying in shape during quarantine... there ARE serious risks!

colonel holman

Veteran Member
Changes in physical activity, spending too much time on TB2K, STRESS.... leads to serious helth risks you my not tolerte, especially if you end up fighting CV-19. (The Chineeeeese Virus).

Reduced activity can quickly reduce lung capacity, reduce the elasticity of lung expansion, reduce air exchange in the lower lobes (where pneumonia usually starts)... all changes that reduce your chances of survival if you get ‘it’. You also risk phlebitis-blood clot in lower extremities, a risk that greatly increases if you end up bedridden sick, and can kill you deader’n’hell.

YOUR INTERVENTION: Take a 20 minute walk EVERY DAY. This rhythmic contract-relax of you thighs and buttocks (quads & gluts) fires a reflex stimulation to the lungs, causing the bronchial tubes to dilate. Walk fast enough to make you a little breathless, giving great ventilation of all lung lobes. Purposely take a few deep breaths fully inhale and (ESPECIALLY) fully exhale to evacuate the deepest lobes of the lungs. Walking also creates leg muscle action against the veins tht run through those muscles, keeping them clear. Those veins have their own muscle layers that work out during a walk.

Siitting around, especially on comfy soft sofa or easy chair, allows your lower back to round over into a posture of mild but highly-sustained forward-bent position. This is how your lumbar discs start to bulge, even herniate, or at least degenerate. This forward bent posture while sitting increases compression on those discs by about 200%. This squeezes the water out of the discs (disc degeneration) and forces the gel in the center of the disc toward the back wall of the disc, which bulges or herniates from this abnormal force. Comfy seating encourages you to sitting too long, magnifying the risk.

YOUR INTERVENTION: Stand up and do a standing back-bend stretch 10 seconds, twice. Do this at least every half-hour. This simple trick is one of the most effective back pain prevention tactics known... and so wicked simple, you have no excuse. Take a 20 minute walk EVERY DAY. This ‘sponges’ the discs with each step; loading-unloading cycles that restore water content and corrects weight distribution cross discs.

Loss of muscle strength in legs occurs quickly. This can be reversed simply with some extra stairs climbing (proper lighting, no crap piled on stairs, good railing, and assuming your heart isn’t about to shit-the-bed, as my own PCP puts it). Make several trips throughout the day, giving yourself adequate workout. Disclaimer disclaimer disclaimer: this assumes you have a heart healthy enough to tolerate this. Keep heart rate below 80% of maximum heart rate for you (220 minus your age is a standard calculation of max HR). (Everyone should have a small pulse oximeter to monitor circulating oxygen levels during pulmonary illness... and it gives you a quick heart rate reading. WM or Amazon hs them about $25).

This is just a starting level discussion. Can add more later
 

Meemur

Voice on the Prairie
Yes to all, plus I'm doing your balance exercises! Daily exercise is part of my health routine, as essential as washing my hands. I'll be honest: it's been hard pushing myself to walk several blocks when it's in the 50s and raining, but I look at photos of those people in hospital beds and suddenly get motivated.
 

nomifyle

Veteran Member
Thanks for the suggestions. I have the perfect place to walk, our driveway is a winding country lane. Halfway down is the empty pig pen, kinda makes me sad there are no piggies in there anymore, but it saves a lot of money on feed not to have them anymore. I can walk safely without anyone seeing me from the highway.

Judy
 

colonel holman

Veteran Member
If you just set up your laptop on your dining room table, you may be at risk for neck-arm-back pain issues.
Here is the newest standard for “office ergonomics”. I did not copyright this, so that anyone can circulate it freely
9871D9FE-3BC8-4684-B28F-D09A4DF18C19.jpeg
 

Ogre

Veteran Member
Thank you! Lower back is a mess from an injury 60+ years ago, but I still try to walk a mile a day plus other exercise.
Can't sit in a soft chair, so that's not a problem. The back bends every 1/2 hour is a great idea, will add that to the mix and look forward to any other suggestions.
 

Rebel_Yell

Member
Changes in physical activity, spending too much time on TB2K, STRESS.... leads to serious helth risks you my not tolerte, especially if you end up fighting CV-19. (The Chineeeeese Virus).

Reduced activity can quickly reduce lung capacity, reduce the elasticity of lung expansion, reduce air exchange in the lower lobes (where pneumonia usually starts)... all changes that reduce your chances of survival if you get ‘it’. You also risk phlebitis-blood clot in lower extremities, a risk that greatly increases if you end up bedridden sick, and can kill you deader’n’hell.

YOUR INTERVENTION: Take a 20 minute walk EVERY DAY. This rhythmic contract-relax of you thighs and buttocks (quads & gluts) fires a reflex stimulation to the lungs, causing the bronchial tubes to dilate. Walk fast enough to make you a little breathless, giving great ventilation of all lung lobes. Purposely take a few deep breaths fully inhale and (ESPECIALLY) fully exhale to evacuate the deepest lobes of the lungs. Walking also creates leg muscle action against the veins tht run through those muscles, keeping them clear. Those veins have their own muscle layers that work out during a walk.

Siitting around, especially on comfy soft sofa or easy chair, allows your lower back to round over into a posture of mild but highly-sustained forward-bent position. This is how your lumbar discs start to bulge, even herniate, or at least degenerate. This forward bent posture while sitting increases compression on those discs by about 200%. This squeezes the water out of the discs (disc degeneration) and forces the gel in the center of the disc toward the back wall of the disc, which bulges or herniates from this abnormal force. Comfy seating encourages you to sitting too long, magnifying the risk.

YOUR INTERVENTION: Stand up and do a standing back-bend stretch 10 seconds, twice. Do this at least every half-hour. This simple trick is one of the most effective back pain prevention tactics known... and so wicked simple, you have no excuse. Take a 20 minute walk EVERY DAY. This ‘sponges’ the discs with each step; loading-unloading cycles that restore water content and corrects weight distribution cross discs.

Loss of muscle strength in legs occurs quickly. This can be reversed simply with some extra stairs climbing (proper lighting, no crap piled on stairs, good railing, and assuming your heart isn’t about to shit-the-bed, as my own PCP puts it). Make several trips throughout the day, giving yourself adequate workout. Disclaimer disclaimer disclaimer: this assumes you have a heart healthy enough to tolerate this. Keep heart rate below 80% of maximum heart rate for you (220 minus your age is a standard calculation of max HR). (Everyone should have a small pulse oximeter to monitor circulating oxygen levels during pulmonary illness... and it gives you a quick heart rate reading. WM or Amazon hs them about $25).

This is just a starting level discussion. Can add more later
Always appreciate your input Doc.
 

Ogre

Veteran Member
I also have a Versa-desk, but need to remind myself to use it more. What are the micro-exercise you mention in the office ergonimics?
 

hunybee

Veteran Member
you are awesome, colonel!

i was telling people to do these early on. to make sure we stay physically active and DO things. not just a "exercise", but have physical activity AND official exercise. it not only helps physically, but mentally as well.

right now, this is an excellent time to actually get up off our butts and start that exercise routine and healthy eating thing that we all say we should be doing. and with all the stuff out there for FREE on instagram alone, we can all find something that will help improve our fitness and strength at the stage we are at right now.

and you don't need a gym to do strength training. there are some very good body weight strength training books and websites.

an excellent person to get info on this and much more is bret contreras, (aka the glute guy) he does a ton of stuff for free. yes, he does do some personal training online (limited), but he honestly just does so much for free.

he has some very good books out, one of them is a body weight book.




if anyone is looking for a very good personal trainer that does not do cookie cutter programs, and also does personal meal plans that are tailor made to you, call these people:


facebook: Blue Ox Fitness

they are a husband and wife team, and are marines. they are GREAT people, and really do give the personal touch. can't say enough good things about them.
 

hunybee

Veteran Member
Why put more stress on your system by exercising?

unless you are already very sick, physical activity like the colonel is talking about is a good thing, for the reasons he mentioned. especially since many people are now LESS active than they were before as they are just sitting around and doing nothing all day.

any time we increase our activity and exercise level, it is a good idea to start small and build so as to not over do it, but starting slow and increasing and building your endurance is a good thing.
 

shane

Has No Life - Lives on TB
Why put more stress on your system by exercising?
Fit people handle stress much better, they've developed deeper reserves.

Regular exercise, though not to excess, is what keeps you fit and strong.

Panic Early, Beat the Rush!
- Shane
readimask.jpg
 

Kathy in FL

Has No Life - Lives on TB
Hubby and I take an intentional 3 to 5 mile walk every … single … day. It is usually at night. Not only do we get out of the house, spend time together, and in general de-stress after our normal day-to-day, it keeps us situationally aware of what is going on in our neighborhood. It exposes us to natural stimuli that in turn stimulates our brain and clears the occasional brain fog my Type 2 meds try and put me through. We sweat out impurities and detox our system. It is hella lot easier on our bones and joints than going to the gym. Our normal rate is between a 15 and 20 minute mile depending on weather and if we are having a serious conversation, usually closer to 15. But that's when we are walking as a pair. I'm short so it cuts down on speed/mph. Hubby's time walking alone is between 12 and 13 mph when walking.

You don't have to walk that fast. I didn't when we started. Just get out and walk. You might not want to but you'll be glad you did, especially after getting through the "wall" that first week and building up some endurance.
 

colonel holman

Veteran Member
Another tip...
Inactivity will Quietly reduce your balance control. You will notice this util you fall,perhps uffering fracture or closed head injury. After age 50 you naturally loses nerve endings within weight-bearing joints in legs and spine, robbing you of balance control. Falls become more frequent and dangerous. The inactivity of self-quarantine will worsen this. Don’t think this affects you? Test yourself simply by standing on one foot for as long as you can hold that balance. Can you do 30 sec with eyes open, or 10 seconds with eyes closed?

Easy to reverse this. Most PT tests become the corrective exercise. Simply try to tand on one foot fr s. Long as possible, on each side. Takes only a minute at most, so steal a few episodes of this daily. You will be surprised how fast you improve.
 

lakemom

Contributing Member
The thing that irritates me the most about this whole pandemic business is the fact that I had JUST joined a gym about 6 weeks before it all started and I MISS MY GYM TIME!!! I was in absolute SORRY shape when I started (still not good lol but I did improve). I started by walking 1.5 mph for 15 mins. on the treadmill twice a day. Slowly increased to 2.7 mph for 30 mins. twice a day, plus about 20 mins. of weights every day. I finally started walking outside last week for about 20 mins. in the evenings with DD and the dog. The first time we went, I could tell how much stamina I had lost just in the short amount of time since I had last been.

What colonel holman said is true. Before I joined, my balance was absolutely shot to hell. I was amazed at how quickly that improved, in addition to how quickly my back started getting stronger once I began working it out.
 

Betty_Rose

Veteran Member
The thing that irritates me the most about this whole pandemic business is the fact that I had JUST joined a gym about 6 weeks before it all started and I MISS MY GYM TIME!!! I was in absolute SORRY shape when I started (still not good lol but I did improve). I started by walking 1.5 mph for 15 mins. on the treadmill twice a day.
I joined a gym about two weeks before this started!! I am still paying but the place is shuttered and closed!!

But I try to walk the hills every other day. Today was the equivalent of 48 flights!!

Woo-hoo!!
 

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lakemom

Contributing Member
It was too late to stop the auto withdrawal for March, but they said it would get credited back. I don't know if they'll do the same thing for April if we're still under social distancing rules. I just know one of the main reasons I'm ready for this to be over (other than the obvious) is so I can start going to the gym again! :eleph:
 

Meemur

Voice on the Prairie
I was afraid to join a gym right now with all of the Influenza B going around in Central Iowa (it has truly been a bad year!) Fortunately, it hasn't been one of those winters with the constant freeze-thaw cycles that leaves the sidewalks icy. The snow melted about mid-February, and the sidewalks and walking trails have been mostly clear. I'm going to start riding my bicycle soon. That and "senior" yoga via DVDs in my living room will help keep me flexible and on the move.
 

straightstreet

Life is better in flip flops
Thanks for the suggestions. I have the perfect place to walk, our driveway is a winding country lane. Halfway down is the empty pig pen, kinda makes me sad there are no piggies in there anymore, but it saves a lot of money on feed not to have them anymore. I can walk safely without anyone seeing me from the highway.

Judy
Sounds lovely :)
 

China Connection

TB Fanatic
Wondered why I am taking NAC for my lungs.

Image result for nac for lungs
www.evergreennutrition.com
NAC can relieve symptoms of respiratory conditions by acting as an antioxidant and expectorant, loosening mucus in your air passageways. As an antioxidant, NAC helps replenish glutathione levels in your lungs and reduces inflammation in your bronchial tubes and lung tissue.Sep 26, 2018
More general ingredient: Cysteine


Top 9 Benefits of NAC (N-Acetyl Cysteine) - Healthline
 

AlaskaSue

North to the Future
Fantastic thread, Colonel, thanks!! I'm attempting to keep up on the WOD on the Spartan Race website, for some serious work. I have almost no equipment here but there are still a lot of things one can do. I sure look forward to getting back outdoors when I don't have ice to contend with :)
Link for Women's workouts if anyone is interested; there are lots of other workouts too: Workouts for Women: Workout of the Day
 

shane

Has No Life - Lives on TB
With no gym, every other day now at home...

100 pushups with feet elevated on 18" stool
60 chin-ups/pull-ups
120 dumbell shoulder side/front/overhead lifts
75 each side weighted ab straightening
120 deep knee bends
60 toe/calf raises

On the in-between rest days, about 1/3 of above.

5 min lung inhalation strain exercises every day
(Bas Rutten's O2 Trainer)

Also, every day regular physical projects & couple
dozen times I'm up/down a flight of stairs.

Panic Early, Beat the Rush!
- Shane
 

Firebird

Veteran Member
My current isolation regimen during this quarantine is walk 5 miles every other day, with as much weight bearing exercise as possible in between
 

Housecarl

On TB every waking moment
Another tip...
Inactivity will Quietly reduce your balance control. You will notice this util you fall,perhps uffering fracture or closed head injury. After age 50 you naturally loses nerve endings within weight-bearing joints in legs and spine, robbing you of balance control. Falls become more frequent and dangerous. The inactivity of self-quarantine will worsen this. Don’t think this affects you? Test yourself simply by standing on one foot for as long as you can hold that balance. Can you do 30 sec with eyes open, or 10 seconds with eyes closed?

Easy to reverse this. Most PT tests become the corrective exercise. Simply try to tand on one foot fr s. Long as possible, on each side. Takes only a minute at most, so steal a few episodes of this daily. You will be surprised how fast you improve.
Tai Chi...there are plenty of videos on line to get you started. :vik:
 

lakemom

Contributing Member
With no gym, every other day now at home...

100 pushups with feet elevated on 18" stool
60 chin-ups/pull-ups
120 dumbell shoulder side/front/overhead lifts
75 each side weighted ab straightening
120 deep knee bends
60 toe/calf raises

On the in-between rest days, about 1/3 of above.

5 min lung inhalation strain exercises every day
(Bas Rutten's O2 Trainer)

Also, every day regular physical projects & couple
dozen times I'm up/down a flight of stairs.

Panic Early, Beat the Rush!
- Shane
Showoff....:lol:
 

Tripod

Senior Member
The best way to stay moving is to stay moving. Most will feel better if they go for even a short walk. Every little bit helps when it comes to exercise, start slow and add a little more each day.
Mike
 

Housecarl

On TB every waking moment
Royal Canadian Air Force Exercise Plans For Physical Fitness

"Five Basic Exercises"- Royal Canadian Air Force 5BX Training Film (1959)
Run time 12:35
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NMGQzMjeO1k

Helen Mirren's 12 minute workout
Run time 1:52
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0dwIgyhHtSM

Helen Mirren's 12 minute workout
76,647 views
•Aug 7, 2014
301 29
Irish Examiner

3.92K subscribers
Tanya Sweeney doing Helen Mirren's 12 minute workout. Video Maura Hickey
 
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