FOOD So, you're spending more time in the kitchen...

Donald Shimoda

In Absentia
Howdy, Folks!

Preface:

To quote Kirk Lazarus, "I gets excited about my foods, man."


I enjoy cooking. I enjoy eating. I'm very good at both.

[I don't even mind doing the dishes. I tend to wash dishes while I cook, so when the meal is on the table, the only dirty dishes are the plates and cutlery being used by those dining.]

~~~~~~~~

I'm sure a few of you are now doing more in the kitchen than you used to in the past.

To work in the kitchen, one must have the proper tools - of which there are many.

Today, I'll be speaking to a very small aspect of that - a good kitchen knife.

I've used dozens over the years. All different types.

For the longest time, my trusty "go to" was a 10-inch, Pre-Cutco 69210-10 Wear-Ever Professional (Made in USA). It's a joy to use.

That said, it's a pretty big knife, and knife steel has improved amazingly since this knife was made.

I was in a thrift store a while back, and picked up a knife set that included a 7-inch Santoku bōchō.

Wow.

The design is fantastic, and the Santoku became my "go to" knife.

Problem was and is, it was poorly made. The blade was decent, but the tang is near non-existent and is almost falling out of the grip.

Still, I've continued to use it as I love the design.

Recently, a friend gifted me an 8-inch Cuisinart Nitrogen Chef's knife, model #C77TRN-8CF.

I'm impressed.

The thing stays razor sharp, and it is a joy to work with.

[That said, I prefer the balance of both my 10-inch chef's knife, and especially my Santoku.]

On top of that, the Cuisinart Nitrogen series is CHEAP. I'm seeing a C77TRN-8CF for less than $12 on Amazon; a 15-piece Nitrogen set (that's a cheat, actually - who really needs the 8 steak knives? The other knives - and the shears and the knife steel - in the set more than make up for it, however) for less than $50:


So, I ordered a Cuisinart Nitrogen Santoku 7-inch blade - - and it came in today.


$15.

The balance is fantastic, and it came out of the packaging razor sharp.

I'm looking forward to putting it through its paces, and seeing if it becomes my new, "go to" knife. I suspect it will.

For those of you now spending more time in the kitchen, the options for high quality tools at remarkably reasonable prices have never been better.

Good luck in all of your culinary endeavors, and I look forward to reading about the kitchen tools that have worked out best for you.

Peace and Love,

Donald Shimoda
 

Toy Maker

Senior Member
I couldn't agree more! I take great care of my kitchen knives, keep them sharp, and wash/put away right after use. I will need to check out the Nitrogen collection. Thanks!
 

mikeabn

Finally not a lurker!
Ok, I am a sucker for the 'as seen on TV' cooking stuff. In the collection is the NuWave Oven which I LOVE, the Power Air Fryer and Pressure Cooker and the Pasta Boat. There are some others but these have served me well.
 

mikeabn

Finally not a lurker!
And possibly unrelated is the Great American Beer Machine. Haven't used it in a long while but it brewed some great beers-just be patient and wait more time than the recommended 10 days.
 

AlaskaSue

North to the Future
You are right, I am spending more time in the kitchen. I meal prep for my brother who works long hours (nights), and he eats Carnivore 99% of the time. Well, he picked up a new knife for me just before this all started happening - one of the best I've ever used. Old Hickory high carbon steel....amazingly good cutter.

I, too, wash as I cook Don! And I'm an old fashioned cook - the only things I use for cooking are the stove top, the oven, and occasionally the deep fryer. Well there's the smoker but that's out in the conex for the season :) But I do have fun cooking at my sons' homes; they have all the gadgets and they're sure nice for quick cooking!
 

dioptase

Contributing Member
I've had to resurrect my very rusty bread baking skills, but this time around I am going for either overnight rises or "turbo" rises, not the traditional method which needs lots of kneading. Since the overnight rises need to be in the fridge, I recently bought this and have found it very useful for storing dough: Standard Dough-Rising Bucket

Since I don't like getting my (arthritic and generally dry) hands in the dough (any more than necessary), I also bought this (which just arrived): https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07ZS72JGD/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1 I'm looking forward to trying it out, as soon as my jumbo muffin pan arrives. (DH wants me to only make bread rolls, not loaves. I had previously only ever done loaves, so my first attempt at baking rolls on a cookie sheet failed, as the dough just sort of oozed out and I ended up with flatbreads. Still edible, but not the desired shape. The jumbo muffin pan should help make a more roll-like shape.)
 

Granana

Contributing Member
40 years ago I bought a set of Cuisinart knives.They are the most amazing knives and my proudest possession. They all hang on an oak rack that hangs on the wall, so no taking up counter space. About 10 years ago the handles started to fall apart. I called Cuisinart to see if I could buy new handles. No such luck. They didn't make them any more. After trying to get 4 different people to make new handles with no luck because each knife has a different size gromet for hanging I finally found a guy who would make them. They cost me $50 a handle and are beautiful and worth every penny. There is a paring knife, two different filet knives. A bread slicing and a meat slicing knife, regular all-purpose slicing knife, and one of those big boy chopping knives. In the end the set has cost me about 75.00 a knife with the new handles but again worth every penny. Always keep them razor sharp.
 

Sherrynboo

Veteran Member
I am not safe using sharp knives! My hubby bought me some for Christmas a few years back and I promptly cut my finger almost bad enough to need stitches. I cut myself every single time I use a very sharp knife .
 

Blue 5

Veteran Member
My wife has been working exclusively from home for the last few weeks, and has expressed how much she enjoys having the time to cook. She has even decided to try her hand at breadmaking, and I'm looking forward to the results!

I can cook, and do so regularly, but if I'm doing the cooking it won't be anything particularly fancy. However, I do have a good set of wood handled Chicago Cutlery knives that I got from my folks. I keep the handles oiled and blades plenty sharp for her to use.
 

Melodi

Disaster Cat
A tip for those in hot climates as the weather warms up - I learned to bake bread from The Garden Way Bread Book (you can still get in from Book Depository) The 1956 Joy of Cooking and the Tassajara Bread Book - all books I still use.

But the Garden Way book had something called "The Busy Rabbi's Challah Bread" method which I used learning in a hot Mississippi Summer while working full time and not having any air conditioning.

Basically you can do this with any yeast or sourdough recipe though the latter may take longer - you make your dough in the morning, put it in a well-greased bowl covered with a damp cloth or paper towel (essential) into the fridge.

When home from work, punch down and form into loaves.

Put loaves in the fridge, also covered with damp cloth/towel - overnight.

Get up a bit early in the morning, pull loaves out and have them sit out for half an hour (if you have time) and then cook as normal.

You can vary this to cook at night (right before supper - stick them in as soon as you get home or an hour or so before supper).

That way you can cook at night (which is what I was doing to keep the heat down).

Most people don't realize that bread will rise in a fridge, it just takes about 8 to 10 hours instead of 1 or 2, which in this case can be a good thing.

I can't stress how wonderful bread bakers (or good Kitchen Aid mixers) are for those of us with elderly shoulders or other medical issues.

You don't have to cook in it, but it will knead most bread to perfection (and I can handle the occasional exception just not every day).
 

WalknTrot

Veteran Member
I still have my grandma's knives - right to hand on a magnet bar in the kitchen. Vintage steel, most bone/antler handle, many obviously hand made. I inherited them from my dad...who hoarded them :) until he passed. Everything from meat processing to fine paring - and probably at least 75 years old.

Bread? Argh. Still fighting the urge. Once that dam breaks, look out. Cardamom bread season (Easter!), Foccacia bread, caramel rolls, oatmeal loaves....:hof:
 

FREEBIRD

Has No Life - Lives on TB
You are right, I am spending more time in the kitchen. I meal prep for my brother who works long hours (nights), and he eats Carnivore 99% of the time. Well, he picked up a new knife for me just before this all started happening - one of the best I've ever used. Old Hickory high carbon steel....amazingly good cutter.

I, too, wash as I cook Don! And I'm an old fashioned cook - the only things I use for cooking are the stove top, the oven, and occasionally the deep fryer. Well there's the smoker but that's out in the conex for the season :) But I do have fun cooking at my sons' homes; they have all the gadgets and they're sure nice for quick cooking!
Loves me some Old Hickory knives. Found mine in thrift shops mostly.
 

Cardinal

Snark: a higher form of communication
_______________
I'm still learning my way around my Instapot. Just made Kahlua Pork the other day and it came out fantastic.
I don't have fancy knives, but I do keep mine sharp. I have an electric knife sharpener which does the trick.
 

Dennis Olson

Chief Curmudgeon
_______________
I found three different “vintage” Old Hickory knives on eBay. They were like new. Though I have to shapen them regularly, their edge is amazing.
 

SouthernBreeze

Veteran Member
I just pulled two homemade bread loaves out of the oven! Still waiting for the money to get my Kitchen Aid. I want it NOW! LOL. I've got a set of Old Hickory kitchen knives I've had for 43 yrs. They are still going strong.
 

Millwright

Knuckle Dragger
_______________
If you can find old carbon steel Henkels or Forschner knives, they are some of the best in the world.
 

CapeCMom

Veteran Member
My favorite knife in my kitchen is my grandmothers steel blade. It’s at least 50 years old and requires meticulous care....but it is the most awesome thing ever. I would trade all my other knives for another one just like it. I also have her ancient black iron pans and I would never trade them either. They don’t make cookware like that anymore. The new stuff doesn’t compare.
 
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