CORONA Senior Executive at Texas ER Chain Reveals Real Reason For Spike in Coronavirus Cases

Jonas Parker

Hooligan

Senior Executive at Texas ER Chain Reveals Real Reason For Spike in Coronavirus Cases
By Cristina Laila Published June 30, 2020 at 12:03pm


The Democrat-media complex has been hammering Texas for its recent spike in Coronavirus cases, blaming Republican Governor Abbott for reopening too early.

Radical Marxist Harris County judge Lina Hidalgo slammed Abbott during a presser on Friday and said, “The harsh truth is that our current infection rate is on pace to overwhelm our hospitals in the very near future. We opened too quickly.”

But what’s really going on in Texas?

A senior executive at a Texas ER chain contacted former NY Times reporter Alex Berenson and revealed the real reason for the spike in Coronavirus ‘cases.’

JB Neiman, a Managing Partner and General Counsel of a Texas-based company that owns 13 free-standing clinics in the state of Texas said he ‘wants people to hear his story as opposed to the mainstream media.’
Neiman explained that in June, his clinics tested over 2,231 patients and saw a COVID-19 positive test rate close to 20% (was 4-6% positive in May).

What are the COVID-19 positive patients experiencing?
Here’s the breakdown:
  • The executive pointed out that the “vast majority of the cases are mild to very mild symptoms.”
  • More testing kits means they are able to test a broader group of patients.
  • Clinically, they’ve had “very few hospital transfers because of COVID.”
  • Vast majority of patients are better within 2-3 days and would be described as “having a cold (a mild one at that) or symptoms related to allergies.
  • Most patients are given a steroid shot and antibiotics and by the time they have follow-up calls, the patients are no longer experiencing any symptoms.
What is driving people to the ER?
The executive breaks that down:
  • Roughly half have been told by their employer to get a test — if they have a sneeze or a cough, their employer tells them to go home and get tested.
  • The other half just want to know if they have COVID (some have mild symptoms and some have no symptoms).
What else is going on in the ICU?
Here’s the breakdown:
  • The hospital ICUs are filled with really sick people with NON-COVID issues. They didn’t come in earlier because they were scared and now they are SUPER SICK.
  • From multiple sources at different hospitals: They have plenty of capacity and no shortage of acute care beds.
  • All patients are tested for COVID: “You have some percentage of patients listed as COVID patients who are non COVID symptomatic and that the hospitalization rate is somewhat driven by hospitals taking in their normal patients with other medical issues.”
Discharge planners are being pressured to put COVID as primary diagnosis because it pays significantly better, according to JB Neiman.

JB Neiman concluded: “What we are seeing at our facilities is more of a positive story…You have more people who are testing positive with minimal symptoms. This means the fatality rate is less that commonly reported.”
Wondering what’s really happening in Texas? Here’s the email, from a senior executive at a Texas ER chain that sees thousands of patients a month. He went on the record – a brave move. I’m going to let him speak for himself. (Two tweets of screenshots. Worth reading to the end.) pic.twitter.com/4xuBdTIFIc
— Alex Berenson (@AlexBerenson) June 30, 2020
The media completely ignores the fact that Coronavirus deaths have dropped significantly which is why they are concentrating on the new ‘cases.’
Sunday coronavirus positivity: deaths hit a new low, down to 273. Lowest coronavirus deaths since March 25th per linked data, down nearly 10% from last Sunday. US Historical Data
— Clay Travis (@ClayTravis) June 28, 2020
As this ER executive clearly explained, the vast majority of new Coronavirus cases are mild to very mild symptoms (or asymptomatic).
 

Meemur

Voice on the Prairie
This is why "boots on the ground" reporting is so important right now.

I still don't know anyone *personally* in the real world who has tested positive for this virus or been so sick that hospitalization was necessary. I do know a number of people who had "a really bad flu" but have recovered. I also know a number of people in their 30s and 40s, with spring allergies, who had a tougher than normal allergy season, as did I. Did we have CV-19, too? Or was it a really good year for pollen. I tend to think the latter from what I read from the allergy center.

I have also heard of grandparents or elderly relatives with underlying conditions dying from CV-19, but I didn't know any of them personally. I have not heard of anyone I know under the age of 85 passing away from CV-19.

Thus, if I depended on what I'm seeing, the virus is no big deal. On the other hand, sources I trust tell me of the mayhem in NYC and in other places, so I do take this virus seriously, but I will now question (and research for myself) whatever the government/CDC tells me, as there are political agendas in play.
 

erichtmobile

Senior Member
My workplace is currently experiencing an "outbreak". 27 confirmed another 18 suspected and waiting on results. This is out of approx 500 workers spread across 4 shifts.

I know many of them well and most have reported only minor symptoms. 2 are in the hospital, both are in thier late 50's and on the overweight side of the spectrum.

I wonder how many of the youngsters have had it and didnt even notice.

This is in DFW
 

AlaskaSue

North to the Future
The OP could be on the right track; all I have to go by here are the Alaska numbers. Since the start of the pandemic, Alaska has had just 67 people hospitalized. That is the TOTAL number - statewide....currently 12 are in the hospital. Overall number who have tested positive is still under 1000 but the increase over the past month was expected with both a big increase in testing and the arrival of seasonal workers.

ETA: As of this evening Alaska has only 3 hospitalized in the state. And I do believe part of the increase in numbers is because we have seen a huge increase in testing. Alaska has only about 700K residents, but have had around 155K tests done. Apparently there may be a lot of false negatives (conjecture), or the people who're positive for CV are very fortunately having milder symptoms.
 
Last edited:

ShadowMan

Crusty ol' Codger
That may be all well and good, and yes the more people you test the more you're going to find....DAH! However I'm not going to take the bet that I'll only get a mild case. All this BS about what age is at risk and such, but now we're seeing a lot of younger people getting seriously sick. ALSO....having a close friend on death's door for OVER THREE MONTHS further sends home that this is not something to just slough off and ignore.

Why would any intelligent (and I use that term loosely) individual put themselves at risk for something that can definitely KILL THEM if given half an opportunity. Personally, if you don't (selfishly) want to wear a mask....DON'T. Just go down to your local police or fire station and register as mask exempt and pick up your DNR bracelet or dog tags so that when you do contract this virus hospital and EMS personnel will know not to bother with any life saving attempts or tasks. You won't be hospitalized. Won't have to worry about hospital insurance or bills. They can just let you die. How's that for efficiency and cost savings?
 

amarilla

Veteran Member
The neighbor kid across the street has CoVid, probably 22-23 years old. Just graduated, got a job at the local hospital as a nurse this month. On sick leave. We have a family member who got a job at the local hospital, started same day. The person started on a non-CoVid floor but it has changed to a CoVid floor.
 

Dozdoats

On TB every waking moment
the vast majority of new Coronavirus cases are mild to very mild symptoms (or asymptomatic).

As have been anywhere from a significant number to more than half of OLD (by reporting date) cases as well.
 

pauldingbabe

The Great Cat
As stated in another post:

My daughter is CoV positive. She has been totally asymptomatic for 2.5 weeks. No feaver, cough, nada THANKS GOD!

She was exposed directly by friends that she spent a weekend with. yes she and the friends have been tested and they are positive. We were exposed in the time between when friends found out they were positive and her coming home for 2 nights. We have a house that is up and downstairs. Both my DD and DS stay downstairs everyone else up. She is preparing for College in the Fall so had been downstairs most of the time she was here. DS is in Florida for the summer. Yep both kids gone at the same time.....wow.

Because of hubby's work we had to be tested because we were a direct contact to a positive individual. Sooooo, off we went for the nose rape kit that gives your eyeballs a little tickle and touches places never touched before. We got our tests back and we are negative, again THANKS GOD!

When DD found out about the positive result she chose leave our house and go quarantine than to further expose her Grandmother (COPD, obese) and my Auntie (2 heart attacks, diabetes) and myself (lifelong asthma and an undiagnosed matter that has symptoms of an Autoimmune nature, Reynolds syndrome and others). My mom is really freaking out about CoV. Anytime we have gone to see DD we are very careful, but at least we can see her. And believe me ima gonna love me up some kitty cat just as soon as humanly possible!!!

She is supposed to start college in the Fall and we are preparing like that is going to happen.

Now lets have some perspective.....

Our daughter is very healthy. Our daughter is only 20yrs old. Our daughter has the good sense God gave her to minimalism the exposure to the rest of her family. Our daughter made a very good decision for her family and We couldn't be more proud! I didn't even try to stop her. She made an adult decision and she has stayed in quarantine the entire time.

This is my experience with CoV19. Doesn't mean that others will have this same outcome.

Our daughter is going to get tested tomorrow to see if she is negative since its been over 14 days. Please God make it so!

Have We been afraid, yes. Have we been stressed out, HAHAHAHAHAHAH you better believe it people! But we also have the most important ally of all God and all the Faith we can find!

Sometimes you have to look for the silver in the clouds.....right?
 

TedM1911

Contributing Member
This is why "boots on the ground" reporting is so important right now.

I still don't know anyone *personally* in the real world who has tested positive for this virus or been so sick that hospitalization was necessary. I do know a number of people who had "a really bad flu" but have recovered. I also know a number of people in their 30s and 40s, with spring allergies, who had a tougher than normal allergy season, as did I. Did we have CV-19, too? Or was it a really good year for pollen. I tend to think the latter from what I read from the allergy center.

I have also heard of grandparents or elderly relatives with underlying conditions dying from CV-19, but I didn't know any of them personally. I have not heard of anyone I know under the age of 85 passing away from CV-19.

Thus, if I depended on what I'm seeing, the virus is no big deal. On the other hand, sources I trust tell me of the mayhem in NYC and in other places, so I do take this virus seriously, but I will now question (and research for myself) whatever the government/CDC tells me, as there are political agendas in play.

I was really sick for 6-8 weeks. Went to the clinic 3 times. Told not covid 19. Was really bad las week. Went to the ER, told again mot CV19. Worked up by cardiology and pulmonary. Told it was severe environmental asthma. Figure out what changed and change it back. 4 tests, 8 weeks or so, no covid.
 

TheSearcher

Are you sure about that?
That may be all well and good, and yes the more people you test the more you're going to find....DAH! However I'm not going to take the bet that I'll only get a mild case. All this BS about what age is at risk and such, but now we're seeing a lot of younger people getting seriously sick. ALSO....having a close friend on death's door for OVER THREE MONTHS further sends home that this is not something to just slough off and ignore.

Why would any intelligent (and I use that term loosely) individual put themselves at risk for something that can definitely KILL THEM if given half an opportunity. Personally, if you don't (selfishly) want to wear a mask....DON'T. Just go down to your local police or fire station and register as mask exempt and pick up your DNR bracelet or dog tags so that when you do contract this virus hospital and EMS personnel will know not to bother with any life saving attempts or tasks. You won't be hospitalized. Won't have to worry about hospital insurance or bills. They can just let you die. How's that for efficiency and cost savings?
So, you advocate that non-believers should die? That's where this discussion is going? Here, on TB2K? We are ALL frustrated by this situation, but this is too much.
 

Bicycle Junkie

Veteran Member
Neiman is full of crap, apparently a political shill; he sounds like Rush who is also full of crap about COVID.
Here's reality, a post on Nextdoor from an Austin ICU nurse:

Message From A Nurse In Austin. Iza Ferrino June 29 at 6:10 PM · Shared with Public Let me paint a picture of what it’s like to be an ICU nurse in Austin TX right now. Our 30 bed ICU is now all COVID. It’s not surprising, we knew it was coming and we’ve been preparing for it but our COVID population grew 50% almost overnight. We weren’t ready. ICU COVID patients are the most complex population I’ve ever worked with in my career as a nurse. These patients go from conversing with you to needing emergent intubation and at the brink of death within minutes. Intubation is not lifesaving, that’s only the beginning of the things they’ll need to keep these patients alive. Once intubated, their oxygen saturation usually doesn’t improve. We need to be quick to sedate patients in order to paralyze them and place them on their bellies so their lungs have the best chance of oxygenating the rest of the body. This of course doesn’t come without complications, their pressures will probably drop. We need to make sure we are ready to tackle a drop in blood pressure because if you don’t, they will die. Oh, but for that you need some central access to give medications. Don’t have access? Well let’s hope you have enough staff to be able to place a line in quickly so you can give all of those life saving medications. Oh, they’ll probably need an art line too so you can accurately treat blood pressures. While you’re at it, you’ll need a DHT for enteral nutrition and medications. Also, a foley and rectal tube too. You’ll also need a few X-Rays to make sure all the lines are in the right place. Oh no, but temperature is 104 F! You don’t want the patient’s brain to fry so you cover them in ice and give them Tylenol (rectally of course because you still don’t have x-ray confirmation yet). Tired of reading? Wait, it’s not over yet. You still have your other patient who’s on multiple lifesaving drips and if they happen to run out they can die. You hear the pump beeping next door, you hope that you can reach your other patient before they start responding negatively to the abrupt cessation of the medication. But you can’t just walk out and go to the other room. Nope, not in a pandemic. You have to wait for someone to answer your plea over walkie to come and help you get to the other room...safely. A few hours later, you are finally able to come out of the room. Covered in sweat because you’ve been wearing layers of PPE and your face covered in bruises from your respirator. You come out, not because your done but because you feel like you’re going to pass out. There’s no cure, we see patients stay with us weeks on end as the virus completely destroys their organs. It is terrifying. There has been multiple times this past week I’ve started laughing just to keep myself from crying. As ICU nurses, we see death all of the time but even that couldn’t prepare us for this. I’ve never seen so many of my coworkers struggle just to get through the day. We’re overwhelmed. We’re tired. We’re running on fumes. We’re human and this is not sustainable. Please do your part to keep this from spreading. It’s not a time for politics, it’s real and we’ve turned it into this mess. Do your part.
 

Kathy in FL

Has No Life - Lives on TB
Every under 30 that I've spoken with that has said they were "covid positive" had a 99F fever for a few hours and just felt run down but that was it. A few did mention losing their sense of smell for a few days but not all of them.

We are living in a culture of fear and that is going to have much worst ramifications moving forward than covid19 will ever be remembered for.
 

TheSearcher

Are you sure about that?
I have yet to meet a single person who has had Covid-19, though I have had FOAF tell me they knew of someone, and the FOAF was not in actual contact with the infected parties. Living in my fairly high-density population south of Houston, I find that more than curious.

As for nurses reporting info, that goes both ways. A lot of fraudulent and mishandled care has been highlighted by some practitioners during this whole thing, so there is immense fog on what is going on. I have several nurse family members, none of them have had horror stories to tell.

I am NOT saying Covid is a hoax contagion. I AM saying that we're being played massively due to its existence.
 
Neiman is full of crap, apparently a political shill; he sounds like Rush who is also full of crap about COVID.
Here's reality, a post on Nextdoor from an Austin ICU nurse:

Message From A Nurse In Austin. Iza Ferrino June 29 at 6:10 PM · Shared with Public Let me paint a picture of what it’s like to be an ICU nurse in Austin TX right now. Our 30 bed ICU is now all COVID. It’s not surprising, we knew it was coming and we’ve been preparing for it but our COVID population grew 50% almost overnight. We weren’t ready. ICU COVID patients are the most complex population I’ve ever worked with in my career as a nurse. These patients go from conversing with you to needing emergent intubation and at the brink of death within minutes. Intubation is not lifesaving, that’s only the beginning of the things they’ll need to keep these patients alive. Once intubated, their oxygen saturation usually doesn’t improve. We need to be quick to sedate patients in order to paralyze them and place them on their bellies so their lungs have the best chance of oxygenating the rest of the body. This of course doesn’t come without complications, their pressures will probably drop. We need to make sure we are ready to tackle a drop in blood pressure because if you don’t, they will die. Oh, but for that you need some central access to give medications. Don’t have access? Well let’s hope you have enough staff to be able to place a line in quickly so you can give all of those life saving medications. Oh, they’ll probably need an art line too so you can accurately treat blood pressures. While you’re at it, you’ll need a DHT for enteral nutrition and medications. Also, a foley and rectal tube too. You’ll also need a few X-Rays to make sure all the lines are in the right place. Oh no, but temperature is 104 F! You don’t want the patient’s brain to fry so you cover them in ice and give them Tylenol (rectally of course because you still don’t have x-ray confirmation yet). Tired of reading? Wait, it’s not over yet. You still have your other patient who’s on multiple lifesaving drips and if they happen to run out they can die. You hear the pump beeping next door, you hope that you can reach your other patient before they start responding negatively to the abrupt cessation of the medication. But you can’t just walk out and go to the other room. Nope, not in a pandemic. You have to wait for someone to answer your plea over walkie to come and help you get to the other room...safely. A few hours later, you are finally able to come out of the room. Covered in sweat because you’ve been wearing layers of PPE and your face covered in bruises from your respirator. You come out, not because your done but because you feel like you’re going to pass out. There’s no cure, we see patients stay with us weeks on end as the virus completely destroys their organs. It is terrifying. There has been multiple times this past week I’ve started laughing just to keep myself from crying. As ICU nurses, we see death all of the time but even that couldn’t prepare us for this. I’ve never seen so many of my coworkers struggle just to get through the day. We’re overwhelmed. We’re tired. We’re running on fumes. We’re human and this is not sustainable. Please do your part to keep this from spreading. It’s not a time for politics, it’s real and we’ve turned it into this mess. Do your part.
Assuming that the patients that this nurse is reporting upon are actually COVID-19 positive and it is the COVID-19 that is the primary agitant, and not other pre-existing conditions/co-morbidities nor another non-COVID-19 viral/bacterial/other that are causing the physical failures of the patient, I have to ask the obvious - why didn't this nurse report that these patients were being treated with hydroxychloroquine + zinc + azrithomycin + liposomal vitamin C?

Not a word of the hydroxychloroquine + zinc + azrithomycin + liposomal vitamin C cocktail treatment for COVID-19 is mentioned in this "COVID-19 is going to be the death of us all" screed.

Why?

If the hydroxychloroquine + zinc + azrithomycin + liposomal vitamin C recommended cocktail treatment for COVID-19 is nothing but PURE BUNKUM, then the above diatribe would be the perfect opportunity for the "COVID-19 kills" bunch to negatively hammer home such an allegation - yet, the hydroxychloroquine + zinc + azrithomycin + liposomal vitamin C cocktail treatment for COVID-19 is not mentioned.

At all.

Strange, that.


intothegoodnight
 
Last edited:
Top