RACE WAR Salvation Army wants white donors to offer a "sincere apology" for their racism

Griz3752

Retired, practising Curmudgeon
That made me go back & read the OP again
Then I right click/searched & verified

Those who've posted on this topic already have pretty much expressed my position; I'm thinking of contacting the SA Leadership to clarify my posture on their new SJW-Inspired political stance.

Holy Crap
 

dioptase

Senior Member
I am appalled to read this. I was considering giving something at Christmas, but nope. Thanks, OP.

(Fwiw, the "considering" is because the last time I looked, they weren't being evaluated by Charity Navigator (unlike Samaritan's Purse) because they refused to disclose financials. Red flag, there.)
 

OldArcher

Has No Life - Lives on TB


Along with coins this Christmas, Salvation Army wants white donors to offer a "sincere apology" for their racism
BUSINESS
Janet richard munn

Richard and Janet Munn are leading the Salvation Army's push to get its white donors to apologize for being racist. | Salvation Army/DifferenceMakers.org
By Central Nova News Reports
Nov 23, 2021

The Salvation Army wants its white donors to give it more than just money this Christmas season. Its leadership is also demanding they apologize for being racist.
It's part of a push by the Christian charitable organization to embrace the ideas of Black Lives Matter, an activist group working to, among other things, "dismantle white privilege" and "disrupt the Western-prescribed nuclear family structure."

The Salvation Army's Alexandria-based leadership has created an "International Social Justice Commission" which has developed and released a "resource" to educate its white donors, volunteers and employees called Let's Talk about Racism. It asserts Christianity is institutionally racist, calling for white Christians to repent and offer "a sincere apology" to blacks for being "antagonistic.. to black people or the culture, values and interests of the black community."

"Many have come to believe that we live in a post-racial society, but racism is very real for our brothers and sisters who are refused jobs and housing, denied basic rights and brutalized and oppressed simply because of the color of their skin," one lesson explains. "There is an urgent need for Christians to evaluate racist attitudes and practices in light of our faith, and to live faithfully in today’s world."

In an accompanying Study Guide on Racism, Salvation Army authors explain that all whites are racist, even if they don't realize it.

“The subtle nature of racism is such that people who are not consciously racist easily function with the privileges, empowerment and benefits of the dominant ethnicity, thus unintentionally perpetuating injustice," it says.
"Sunday school curriculum that only uses white photography and imagery" is an example given that perpetuates injustice.
"We must stop denying the existence of individual and systemic/ institutional racism. They exist, and are still at work to keep White Americans in power," the lesson says.

"These systems give privileges to white people"
Let's Talk about Racism pushes arguments identical to those of leading "Critical Race Theory" purveyors Robin DiAngelo and Henry Rogers (a.k.a. Ibram Kendi), whose work is recommended by Salvation Army authors.

DiAngelo and Rogers (Kendi) claim that any observable difference in relative behavior or accomplishment between racial groups is due to the inherent racism of whites, arguing against the traditional American concept of equal opportunity in favor of the Marxist-inspired goal of equality of outcome.

"Structural racism.. is the overarching system of racial bias across institutions and society. These systems give privileges to White people resulting in disadvantages to (blacks)," reads a Salvation Army lesson.
Proponents of "Critical Race Theory" don't believe whites, Asians or Hispanics can avoid being prejudiced against blacks. They want them to demonstrate what they call "anti-racism" in favor of blacks, helping to establish lower standards for them than they do members of other racial groups, or making cash "reparation" payments to blacks as compensation for alleged previous racism.

"Stop trying to be ‘colorblind’. While this might sound helpful, it actually ignores the God-given differences we all possess, as well as the beautiful cultures of our Black and Brown brothers and sisters," Let's Talk about Racism explains. "Instead of trying to be colorblind, try seeing the beauty in our differences, and welcome them into your homes churches and workplaces. Being colorblind also ignores the discrimination our Black and Brown brothers and sisters face and does not allow us to address racism properly."

Founded in 1865 in London, England, the Salvation Army is both a protestant Christian church and an international charitable organization. Its first "red kettle" was set up in Oakland, California in 1891.
National advisory board members include Dallas Cowboys Owner Jerry Jones, Chick-Fil-A Foundation President Rodney Bullard and charter school pioneer J.C. Huizenga
For whatever good they might have done in the past, they can EASD now. Only the ignorant, arrogant, and stupid would take their stance. They now deserve NOTHING, as if they ever did. Organized religion? Don’t expect to be respected or valued, outside of your servitude and money, of course…

OA
 

Meemur

Voice on the Prairie
My "charity" money is going directly to several in need in the form of a grocery card, which can also be used for gas. No donations to any organizations! Zip! Nada!

This way, I know 100% of my donation will be used as I intend it, not on someone's salary or a fancy new building.
 

bassaholic

Veteran Member
Don't know if it will accomplish anything. Bell ringers earn minimum wage. Just because someone is a bell ringer doesn't mean they are philosophically a part of the church.
30 years ago I was offered the job and I knew several people that got hired for the job. Just regular people.

Nothing to do with any church.

Lots of theft back then as well. Inside jobs.
 

et2

Has No Life - Lives on TB
Just a thought. What if … this is being done on purpose and someone else with deep pockets will be giving them a lot of money. Makes zero sense to alienate your main contributors.

Just more infiltration by the planners to push their agenda against whites.

They just fed racism and took food from those that need it.
 

Terriannie

Has No Life - Lives on TB
Dear Salvation Army,

You do realize that the vast majority of race in The United States is white. You also must realize that the vast majority of whites who donate to The Salvation Army are fully aware that our donations, prayers and well wishes go to ALL races including blacks.

If we were racist we would specify what portions would go to what race we choose which is about as ridiculous as you expecting us to apologize for something we haven't done.

Since the insulting "apology" is supposed to accompany my donation, neither "apology" or money will be enclosed.

This stance will remain so until you come out of your liberal cult which falls for an ideology that bullies, espouses hate, retribution and division instead of the true anti-racist stance which is, all are made in the image and likeness of God and as Martin Luther King Jr. says, we should not judged by the color of our skin, but the content of our character. See how easy that is?
 

Walrus

Veteran Member
Wow! One of the very few ministries I thought was on the up and up…

If this is true, they’re dead to me and millions of others…that’s just the way it is…

May the Lord judge between them and those that supported them for years…the same people they’re slandering and insulting!
I'm seriously thinking about printing up a bunch of little notes to put into kettles as I pass by, which will read:

Sorry.

NOT REALLY.


What's really sad about this is that the millions of people the SA have helped are going to be the ones bearing the brunt of the rage. The SA officers will still get their salaries (unless their board boots them quickly in the next few days and apologizes)
 

summerthyme

Administrator
_______________
All thier "

All their "officers " live a pretty posh existence.
I have to dispute this, although I'll concede my information may be outdated. SA had an *excellent * ratio* of how funds were spent. Less than 10% on administrative costs, including salaries. And salaries were FAR below private sector, including the CEO (or whatever they called him) making a fraction of what the hesd of Goodwill or Red Cross made.

I'm very disgusted with this stance of theirs, because it is corrupting what was one of the truly effective Christian organizations helping those who were down and out, or just down on their luck. But if their salary structure has exploded (and I'd like proof that it has), that would indicate the organization is completely lost.

Summerthyme
 

summerthyme

Administrator
_______________
So the bell ringers are hired? I thought they were volunteers.
The ones in our former small town were all volunteers. I suspect it's impossible to find volunteers in the cities... plus, there might be some issues with necessary background checks, or do they just hand the kettle and bell over to any gangbanger who applies?

Summerthyme has
 

Papa

Contributing Member


Along with coins this Christmas, Salvation Army wants white donors to offer a "sincere apology" for their racism
BUSINESS
Janet richard munn

Richard and Janet Munn are leading the Salvation Army's push to get its white donors to apologize for being racist. | Salvation Army/DifferenceMakers.org
By Central Nova News Reports
Nov 23, 2021

The Salvation Army wants its white donors to give it more than just money this Christmas season. Its leadership is also demanding they apologize for being racist.
It's part of a push by the Christian charitable organization to embrace the ideas of Black Lives Matter, an activist group working to, among other things, "dismantle white privilege" and "disrupt the Western-prescribed nuclear family structure."

The Salvation Army's Alexandria-based leadership has created an "International Social Justice Commission" which has developed and released a "resource" to educate its white donors, volunteers and employees called Let's Talk about Racism. It asserts Christianity is institutionally racist, calling for white Christians to repent and offer "a sincere apology" to blacks for being "antagonistic.. to black people or the culture, values and interests of the black community."

"Many have come to believe that we live in a post-racial society, but racism is very real for our brothers and sisters who are refused jobs and housing, denied basic rights and brutalized and oppressed simply because of the color of their skin," one lesson explains. "There is an urgent need for Christians to evaluate racist attitudes and practices in light of our faith, and to live faithfully in today’s world."

In an accompanying Study Guide on Racism, Salvation Army authors explain that all whites are racist, even if they don't realize it.

“The subtle nature of racism is such that people who are not consciously racist easily function with the privileges, empowerment and benefits of the dominant ethnicity, thus unintentionally perpetuating injustice," it says.
"Sunday school curriculum that only uses white photography and imagery" is an example given that perpetuates injustice.
"We must stop denying the existence of individual and systemic/ institutional racism. They exist, and are still at work to keep White Americans in power," the lesson says.

"These systems give privileges to white people"
Let's Talk about Racism pushes arguments identical to those of leading "Critical Race Theory" purveyors Robin DiAngelo and Henry Rogers (a.k.a. Ibram Kendi), whose work is recommended by Salvation Army authors.

DiAngelo and Rogers (Kendi) claim that any observable difference in relative behavior or accomplishment between racial groups is due to the inherent racism of whites, arguing against the traditional American concept of equal opportunity in favor of the Marxist-inspired goal of equality of outcome.

"Structural racism.. is the overarching system of racial bias across institutions and society. These systems give privileges to White people resulting in disadvantages to (blacks)," reads a Salvation Army lesson.
Proponents of "Critical Race Theory" don't believe whites, Asians or Hispanics can avoid being prejudiced against blacks. They want them to demonstrate what they call "anti-racism" in favor of blacks, helping to establish lower standards for them than they do members of other racial groups, or making cash "reparation" payments to blacks as compensation for alleged previous racism.

"Stop trying to be ‘colorblind’. While this might sound helpful, it actually ignores the God-given differences we all possess, as well as the beautiful cultures of our Black and Brown brothers and sisters," Let's Talk about Racism explains. "Instead of trying to be colorblind, try seeing the beauty in our differences, and welcome them into your homes churches and workplaces. Being colorblind also ignores the discrimination our Black and Brown brothers and sisters face and does not allow us to address racism properly."

Founded in 1865 in London, England, the Salvation Army is both a protestant Christian church and an international charitable organization. Its first "red kettle" was set up in Oakland, California in 1891.
National advisory board members include Dallas Cowboys Owner Jerry Jones, Chick-Fil-A Foundation President Rodney Bullard and charter school pioneer J.C. Huizenga
no more donations from me
 

ShadowMan

Designated Old Fart
My Highland ancestors where forced out of Scotland by the English. Eventually ended up in Central Ohio, fought in the Civil War to end slavery, so I'll apologize for being white when THEY thank me for being freed. Until then piss off on this racism B.S.!

On second thought, I'm not apologizing for what God made me or them. If they don't like it, take it up with The Boss.
 

mzkitty

I give up.
Salvation Army's Donors Withdraw Support in Response to Racial 'Wokeness' Initiative
13 hrs ago

As The Salvation Army launches its Red Kettle Campaign this holiday season, some of its long-time donors are withdrawing their support from the 156-year old charitable organization citing its newly embraced "woke" ideology as the reason.

Of great concern to loyal supporters and faithful Salvationists is the initiative dubbed "Let's Talk About Racism." In a nutshell, its curriculum outlines the Christian church's alleged racial collusion and provides action steps to analyze and combat racism through an "anti-racist" lens while incorporating Critical Race Theory.

Definitions of institutional and systemic racism are included while real or perceived differences in life outcomes ("inequities") are attributable not to individual effort and other circumstances, but to discrimination. Sections address topics including police brutality, health care and Black unemployment linking such topics to "racial inequity."

That's troublesome for those who note The Salvation Army has been a leader in confronting racism long before the rest of the country and over five decades before the civil rights movement. And they're asking why then should members of an organization built by the Christian faith to actually assist people of all races in need, be repentant of behavior they never perpetuated?

"In my estimation, CRT is a Trojan horse taking in well-intentioned Christian enterprises that—because they care about justice and oppose oppression—naively promote the most serious threat to biblical Christianity I have seen in 50 years," wrote Christian apologist and radio talk show host Greg Koukl in a Facebook post earlier this month.

Entitled An Open Letter to The Salvation Army, Koukl prefaces the post by informing TSA that he is terminating his monthly donations and directing them to another organization. Koukl is also the founder and president of the Stand to Reason, a non-profit religious organization that "trains Christians to think more clearly about their faith and to make an even-handed defense for classical Christianity."

"There is a massive number of academics—Black and white, Christian and non-Christian, atheist and theist—who have raised the alarm against the aggressive indoctrination and, frankly, bullying of CRT—not to mention the racial essentialism inherent in the view, the false witness it bears against virtuous people, and the general destruction it continues to wreak on race relations in this country. CRT has set us back 50 years," he continued.

Koukl isn't the only one that's voiced his concerns over the new training created through TSA's International Social Justice Commission. It was last July that it was disseminated through emails, videos, devotionals and other materials to field officers serving poor communities across the U.S. by the organization's four territorial commanders.

That was after General Brian Peddle, CEO of The Salvation Army announced the initiative in February through a video in which he said "it examines racism through the lens of scripture, church and world history and guides gracious discussions about overcoming the damage racism has inflicted upon our world and yes, on our Salvation Army."

"As we anticipate having courageous conversations about race please join me in working toward a world in which all people feel included, valued and loved on Earth just as they are in heaven," Peddle stated in the one-minute video.

But a commentary by author Kenny Xu published on the conservative news website The Daily Signal last month addressed what he described as the Commission "unhealthily mixing admirable human rights works with politically charged advocacy based in politics."

Xu, who is also the president of Color Us United—an organization that advocates for a race-blind America—noted terms that "echo both radical 'anti-racism' jargon and divisive teachings of critical race theory" in the materials prepared for The Salvation Army's more than 1.7 million members. It's terminology that Xu notes, "divides people into two camps: the oppressors and the oppressed."

"In some aspects, the materials are indistinguishable from the 'anti-racist' programs of any multinational corporation, or the expounding of critical race theory at a major university," wrote Xu, noting that "Let's Talk About Racism" accuses white Salvationists of being unable or unwilling to acknowledge their racism. He also noted its encouragement for whites to read Robin DiAngelo's White Fragility and Ibram X. Kendi's How to Be an Antiracist.

But as Xu reminds readers in his piece, "the Gospel itself is colorblind."

"Despite what the church's International Social Justice Commission says, ordinary members of The Salvation Army are committed to a colorblind perspective, and admirably so," he wrote, noting that faithful Salvationists recognize this. Xu also contends that an individual's perspective of social justice analysis doesn't necessarily correspond to the Christian ethic of individual salvation.

Xu questioned why the traditionally a-political Salvation Army would begin to promote such political and racial ideologies to begin with, which led him to organize a petition, co-written by Salvation Army captains and sponsored through Color Us United. It asks those to "stand against the insertion of politically charged racial ideologies into The Salvation Army's good work."

The appeal, calling for a revocation of the "Let's Talk About Racism" curriculum, currently has 12,200 signatures from members and donors rejecting what they consider a "woke script."

Originally founded in London in 1865 by one-time Methodist preacher William Booth and his wife Catherine, TSA is both a Christian church and an international charitable organization. Organized in an "army" structure with officers, soldiers and volunteers, collectively they are referred to as Salvationists who are called to serve both the physical and spiritual needs of the impoverished as their Christian faith dictates.

"Repentance solely for the fact that you're white, we don't think that's very productive," Xu told Newsweek, who also noted that 60 percent of those served by The Salvation Army are from ethnic minority communities. That's a statistic he told Newsweek he discovered by talking to Commissioner and TSA National Commander Kenneth G. Hodder.

"Here's the thing with the SA that's so crazy—these people spend their entire lives serving the poor," said Xu. "There is absolutely no reason to even suggest or insinuate repentance for their supposed complicity in racism."

Xu noted that after he spoke to Hodder about his concerns and current petition, the extensive "Let's Talk About Racism" guide (along with its diversity, equity and inclusion trainings) was moved from the first page of The Salvation Army's International Social Justice Commission site to a less visible page. In a November 4 Facebook post by Koukl, he noted it was now listed as a guide on the site's "Resources" page.

While Newsweek reached out to both Peddle and Hodder, External Communications Manager Joseph Cohen responded to questions regarding the initiative and corresponding petition.

Cohen said The Salvation Army has in no way changed its views or adopted any new ideology, like CRT.

"Our beliefs have always been rooted in scripture, and they still are. That includes our complete rejection of racism, which is in stark contrast to the biblical principle that we're all created in the image of God. We believe that, as God loves us all, so we should all love one another," said Cohen, noting the organization's international positional statement on the issue, which was created in 2017.

Cohen did recognize that TSA occasionally provides voluntary discussion guides to its people to prepare them to engage with others on various topics. In terms of racism, two such guides have been prepared through the International Social Justice Commission, he explained.

"But these voluntary discussion guides certainly are not required, and they never take the place of our Positional Statements," said Cohen. "For us, the Truth in scripture is always supreme."

Additionally, Cohen noted that The Salvation Army has gifted more than $200 million in direct financial assistance to help people stay in their homes in 2021. Since the beginning of the pandemic, the non-profit has provided more than $225 million meals, $81 million in utility assistance and $111 million in rent and mortgage assistance.

A Newsweek story published earlier this month noted that Americans gave more charitable donations to the United Way Worldwide and the Salvation Army in 2020 than to any other nonprofit focusing on direct aid, as reported by the Associated Press. Specifically, the SA raised $1.8 billion in 2020, an increase of 31 percent from the previous year.

Still, there are those inside the organization that are finding it challenging to accept the incongruence between the organization's new initiative and its historically non-political stance.

"As so many oppose this within and without our ranks, why are we clinging onto it so tightly?" wrote active officer Kevin Charles DeJesus of the Salvation Army's western territory, in a public Facebook post that he has since taken down.

In it, DeJesus, who is Black, asked Salvation Army leaders and influencers to get the organization back to being apolitical.

"I am directly calling upon you, without equivocation, to restore The Salvation Army's purely apolitical position and spirit of Blood and Fire/World for God Salvationism," DeJesus wrote in the preface of his post. "There are countless individuals who are working angles and schemes of racial justice and unity. For that reason alone, why are we so fixated on this, the environment, DEI initiatives, and other things that make us indistinguishable from academia, humanism, and other things that appear partisan?"

DeJesus also removed a corresponding follow-up video message he made to his initial post.

Meanwhile, Newsweek talked to other donors, who are at the very least questioning the Salvation Army's entree into "woke" territory with some, like Koukl, going so far as to pull their support entirely.

One such concerned donor is a longtime former chairman of the organization's advisory board and current national board advisory member Mary Theroux.

"I have a real problem with that website and the resources that are suggested readings—to my mind they do not accord with what I've seen at the SA," said Theroux, who has spent more than 25 years in a governing role.

"They're silly notions that are not going to resolve the disparate conditions of people." Rather, Theroux said there are concerted actions people can take rather than "spending a lot of time and effort in training or gnashing of teeth."

"I don't think it advances real solutions and real solutions are needed," added Theroux. "Jargon like systemic racism and whiteness being a sin is a smokescreen for correctly diagnosing the problems and addressing them in a meaningful way that will resolve them."

That's while another long-time supporter expressed his dismay in an email thanking Xu for his recent piece and sharing his own letter to Salvation Army leaders.

"I have been a faithful supporter of The Salvation Army for many years. My parents were supporters when they were alive, and they passed that down to me and my siblings. It was always a joy to see the red kettles around the holidays, as well as to hear of the efforts of TSA in helping the poor and those affected by disasters," wrote Richard N. Nakano. "Now I have noticed TSA has taken a turn to the far left politically, championing and virtue signaling such 'woke' policies as LGBTQ 'rights' and CRT. I am very disappointed the TSA has turned away from its Christ-centered mission, and is now embracing such un-Christian, world-centered views."

Nakano went on to write, "Until the TSA admits its error, denounces these woke views and turns back to its original foundations, I will NOT support it—financially or otherwise. There are other Christian organizations I can send my donations to, just as deserving and NOT politically subservient to the woke mob."

Xu, who re-iterated that his goal is for the Salvation Army to release a statement renouncing CRT in its racial equity push, said he felt a duty to speak out against it and for those who otherwise couldn't speak for themselves.

"If you truly believe that racism is evil—you need to get rid of CRT, which is a racist ideology, assigning certain characteristics to one race and some to others," said Xu.

Added Theroux, who noted the most valuable thing to her while working with the Salvation Army is the learning she's seen "on the ground" by the officers who model Christ's love and action all the time.

"They look at individuals and truly see every one of us, whether you're a board member or someone in need—they do not see the difference between us. That's what's been so personally valuable to me," said Theroux, noting she doesn't see "wokeness" at the level she's working at. "What I see are people who have dedicated their lives."

"The Salvation Army I know is doing extremely good work, given that I do have concerns about this messaging I see," she added. "Again, I love the Army and I don't want to see it hurt. It's like when you have a friend and they're doing something silly—you feel the need to correct them."

Salvation Army's Donors Withdraw Support in Response to Racial 'Wokeness' Initiative (msn.com)
 

Attachments

WalknTrot

Veteran Member
at the risk of being flamed......has this been verified? I have given plenty to this organization because it is one of the last whose expenses to charity make sense. If true they are finished..... the only people that give them a contribution are white middle classers.......
Yeah..before I cut them off completely, I want to wait to hear the official response from the org. The timing is such (right before Christmas and their biggest fund raising season?) that IF somebody, for some reason, wanted to do a hit on them, it would be primo.

Also, personally, I would never rag on the individual bell-ringers at the door. At least around here, (N MN) most are simple volunteers standing out there freezing their bunz off, trying to do some good for a few hours, or teach their kids something.
 

hunybee

Veteran Member
I have to dispute this, although I'll concede my information may be outdated. SA had an *excellent * ratio* of how funds were spent. Less than 10% on administrative costs, including salaries. And salaries were FAR below private sector, including the CEO (or whatever they called him) making a fraction of what the hesd of Goodwill or Red Cross made.

I'm very disgusted with this stance of theirs, because it is corrupting what was one of the truly effective Christian organizations helping those who were down and out, or just down on their luck. But if their salary structure has exploded (and I'd like proof that it has), that would indicate the organization is completely lost.

Summerthyme

that is why i said i want to see their accounting books.
 

fish hook

Veteran Member
All i kno
I have to dispute this, although I'll concede my information may be outdated. SA had an *excellent * ratio* of how funds were spent. Less than 10% on administrative costs, including salaries. And salaries were FAR below private sector, including the CEO (or whatever they called him) making a fraction of what the hesd of Goodwill or Red Cross made.

I'm very disgusted with this stance of theirs, because it is corrupting what was one of the truly effective Christian organizations helping those who were down and out, or just down on their luck. But if their salary structure has exploded (and I'd like proof that it has), that would indicate the organization is completely lost.

Summerthyme
w is what i observed. back in the 70's i was a pest control tech. I had a couple of their houses on my route. They were top of the line in the wealthiest neighbor hoods in Birmingham. It is possible that they were donated as a tax write off, i just don't know, but they were living pretty high.
 

cyberiot

Workin' the plan.
Dear Salvation Army,

You do realize that the vast majority of race in The United States is white. You also must realize that the vast majority of whites who donate to The Salvation Army are fully aware that our donations, prayers and well wishes go to ALL races including blacks.

If we were racist we would specify what portions would go to what race we choose which is about as ridiculous as you expecting us to apologize for something we haven't done.

Since the insulting "apology" is supposed to accompany my donation, neither "apology" or money will be enclosed.

This stance will remain so until you come out of your liberal cult which falls for an ideology that bullies, espouses hate, retribution and division instead of the true anti-racist stance which is, all are made in the image and likeness of God and as Martin Luther King Jr. says, we should not judged by the color of our skin, but the content of our character. See how easy that is?
Brilliant!
 
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CaryC

Veteran Member
Don't know if it will accomplish anything. Bell ringers earn minimum wage. Just because someone is a bell ringer doesn't mean they are philosophically a part of the church.
Dang I must be dumb as a post. I didn't know they paid those bell ringers. I thought it was so nice for them to DONATE their time for a good cause. I know I did, when I was young. Need more eyes wide open.
 

WalknTrot

Veteran Member
Dang I must be dumb as a post. I didn't know they paid those bell ringers. I thought it was so nice for them to DONATE their time for a good cause. I know I did, when I was young. Need more eyes wide open.
I think it depends on the area and how involved the locals are volunteer-wise and values-wise.
Urban/disjointed/toxic communities - not so much. Those folks stuck living in them or there by choice don't know what they are missing....on a LOT of fronts.
 

CaryC

Veteran Member
Salvation Army's Donors Withdraw Support in Response to Racial 'Wokeness' Initiative
13 hrs ago

As The Salvation Army launches its Red Kettle Campaign this holiday season, some of its long-time donors are withdrawing their support from the 156-year old charitable organization citing its newly embraced "woke" ideology as the reason.

Of great concern to loyal supporters and faithful Salvationists is the initiative dubbed "Let's Talk About Racism." In a nutshell, its curriculum outlines the Christian church's alleged racial collusion and provides action steps to analyze and combat racism through an "anti-racist" lens while incorporating Critical Race Theory.

Definitions of institutional and systemic racism are included while real or perceived differences in life outcomes ("inequities") are attributable not to individual effort and other circumstances, but to discrimination. Sections address topics including police brutality, health care and Black unemployment linking such topics to "racial inequity."

That's troublesome for those who note The Salvation Army has been a leader in confronting racism long before the rest of the country and over five decades before the civil rights movement. And they're asking why then should members of an organization built by the Christian faith to actually assist people of all races in need, be repentant of behavior they never perpetuated?

"In my estimation, CRT is a Trojan horse taking in well-intentioned Christian enterprises that—because they care about justice and oppose oppression—naively promote the most serious threat to biblical Christianity I have seen in 50 years," wrote Christian apologist and radio talk show host Greg Koukl in a Facebook post earlier this month.

Entitled An Open Letter to The Salvation Army, Koukl prefaces the post by informing TSA that he is terminating his monthly donations and directing them to another organization. Koukl is also the founder and president of the Stand to Reason, a non-profit religious organization that "trains Christians to think more clearly about their faith and to make an even-handed defense for classical Christianity."

"There is a massive number of academics—Black and white, Christian and non-Christian, atheist and theist—who have raised the alarm against the aggressive indoctrination and, frankly, bullying of CRT—not to mention the racial essentialism inherent in the view, the false witness it bears against virtuous people, and the general destruction it continues to wreak on race relations in this country. CRT has set us back 50 years," he continued.

Koukl isn't the only one that's voiced his concerns over the new training created through TSA's International Social Justice Commission. It was last July that it was disseminated through emails, videos, devotionals and other materials to field officers serving poor communities across the U.S. by the organization's four territorial commanders.

That was after General Brian Peddle, CEO of The Salvation Army announced the initiative in February through a video in which he said "it examines racism through the lens of scripture, church and world history and guides gracious discussions about overcoming the damage racism has inflicted upon our world and yes, on our Salvation Army."

"As we anticipate having courageous conversations about race please join me in working toward a world in which all people feel included, valued and loved on Earth just as they are in heaven," Peddle stated in the one-minute video.

But a commentary by author Kenny Xu published on the conservative news website The Daily Signal last month addressed what he described as the Commission "unhealthily mixing admirable human rights works with politically charged advocacy based in politics."

Xu, who is also the president of Color Us United—an organization that advocates for a race-blind America—noted terms that "echo both radical 'anti-racism' jargon and divisive teachings of critical race theory" in the materials prepared for The Salvation Army's more than 1.7 million members. It's terminology that Xu notes, "divides people into two camps: the oppressors and the oppressed."

"In some aspects, the materials are indistinguishable from the 'anti-racist' programs of any multinational corporation, or the expounding of critical race theory at a major university," wrote Xu, noting that "Let's Talk About Racism" accuses white Salvationists of being unable or unwilling to acknowledge their racism. He also noted its encouragement for whites to read Robin DiAngelo's White Fragility and Ibram X. Kendi's How to Be an Antiracist.

But as Xu reminds readers in his piece, "the Gospel itself is colorblind."

"Despite what the church's International Social Justice Commission says, ordinary members of The Salvation Army are committed to a colorblind perspective, and admirably so," he wrote, noting that faithful Salvationists recognize this. Xu also contends that an individual's perspective of social justice analysis doesn't necessarily correspond to the Christian ethic of individual salvation.

Xu questioned why the traditionally a-political Salvation Army would begin to promote such political and racial ideologies to begin with, which led him to organize a petition, co-written by Salvation Army captains and sponsored through Color Us United. It asks those to "stand against the insertion of politically charged racial ideologies into The Salvation Army's good work."

The appeal, calling for a revocation of the "Let's Talk About Racism" curriculum, currently has 12,200 signatures from members and donors rejecting what they consider a "woke script."

Originally founded in London in 1865 by one-time Methodist preacher William Booth and his wife Catherine, TSA is both a Christian church and an international charitable organization. Organized in an "army" structure with officers, soldiers and volunteers, collectively they are referred to as Salvationists who are called to serve both the physical and spiritual needs of the impoverished as their Christian faith dictates.

"Repentance solely for the fact that you're white, we don't think that's very productive," Xu told Newsweek, who also noted that 60 percent of those served by The Salvation Army are from ethnic minority communities. That's a statistic he told Newsweek he discovered by talking to Commissioner and TSA National Commander Kenneth G. Hodder.

"Here's the thing with the SA that's so crazy—these people spend their entire lives serving the poor," said Xu. "There is absolutely no reason to even suggest or insinuate repentance for their supposed complicity in racism."

Xu noted that after he spoke to Hodder about his concerns and current petition, the extensive "Let's Talk About Racism" guide (along with its diversity, equity and inclusion trainings) was moved from the first page of The Salvation Army's International Social Justice Commission site to a less visible page. In a November 4 Facebook post by Koukl, he noted it was now listed as a guide on the site's "Resources" page.

While Newsweek reached out to both Peddle and Hodder, External Communications Manager Joseph Cohen responded to questions regarding the initiative and corresponding petition.

Cohen said The Salvation Army has in no way changed its views or adopted any new ideology, like CRT.

"Our beliefs have always been rooted in scripture, and they still are. That includes our complete rejection of racism, which is in stark contrast to the biblical principle that we're all created in the image of God. We believe that, as God loves us all, so we should all love one another," said Cohen, noting the organization's international positional statement on the issue, which was created in 2017.

Cohen did recognize that TSA occasionally provides voluntary discussion guides to its people to prepare them to engage with others on various topics. In terms of racism, two such guides have been prepared through the International Social Justice Commission, he explained.

"But these voluntary discussion guides certainly are not required, and they never take the place of our Positional Statements," said Cohen. "For us, the Truth in scripture is always supreme."

Additionally, Cohen noted that The Salvation Army has gifted more than $200 million in direct financial assistance to help people stay in their homes in 2021. Since the beginning of the pandemic, the non-profit has provided more than $225 million meals, $81 million in utility assistance and $111 million in rent and mortgage assistance.

A Newsweek story published earlier this month noted that Americans gave more charitable donations to the United Way Worldwide and the Salvation Army in 2020 than to any other nonprofit focusing on direct aid, as reported by the Associated Press. Specifically, the SA raised $1.8 billion in 2020, an increase of 31 percent from the previous year.

Still, there are those inside the organization that are finding it challenging to accept the incongruence between the organization's new initiative and its historically non-political stance.

"As so many oppose this within and without our ranks, why are we clinging onto it so tightly?" wrote active officer Kevin Charles DeJesus of the Salvation Army's western territory, in a public Facebook post that he has since taken down.

In it, DeJesus, who is Black, asked Salvation Army leaders and influencers to get the organization back to being apolitical.

"I am directly calling upon you, without equivocation, to restore The Salvation Army's purely apolitical position and spirit of Blood and Fire/World for God Salvationism," DeJesus wrote in the preface of his post. "There are countless individuals who are working angles and schemes of racial justice and unity. For that reason alone, why are we so fixated on this, the environment, DEI initiatives, and other things that make us indistinguishable from academia, humanism, and other things that appear partisan?"

DeJesus also removed a corresponding follow-up video message he made to his initial post.

Meanwhile, Newsweek talked to other donors, who are at the very least questioning the Salvation Army's entree into "woke" territory with some, like Koukl, going so far as to pull their support entirely.

One such concerned donor is a longtime former chairman of the organization's advisory board and current national board advisory member Mary Theroux.

"I have a real problem with that website and the resources that are suggested readings—to my mind they do not accord with what I've seen at the SA," said Theroux, who has spent more than 25 years in a governing role.

"They're silly notions that are not going to resolve the disparate conditions of people." Rather, Theroux said there are concerted actions people can take rather than "spending a lot of time and effort in training or gnashing of teeth."

"I don't think it advances real solutions and real solutions are needed," added Theroux. "Jargon like systemic racism and whiteness being a sin is a smokescreen for correctly diagnosing the problems and addressing them in a meaningful way that will resolve them."

That's while another long-time supporter expressed his dismay in an email thanking Xu for his recent piece and sharing his own letter to Salvation Army leaders.

"I have been a faithful supporter of The Salvation Army for many years. My parents were supporters when they were alive, and they passed that down to me and my siblings. It was always a joy to see the red kettles around the holidays, as well as to hear of the efforts of TSA in helping the poor and those affected by disasters," wrote Richard N. Nakano. "Now I have noticed TSA has taken a turn to the far left politically, championing and virtue signaling such 'woke' policies as LGBTQ 'rights' and CRT. I am very disappointed the TSA has turned away from its Christ-centered mission, and is now embracing such un-Christian, world-centered views."

Nakano went on to write, "Until the TSA admits its error, denounces these woke views and turns back to its original foundations, I will NOT support it—financially or otherwise. There are other Christian organizations I can send my donations to, just as deserving and NOT politically subservient to the woke mob."

Xu, who re-iterated that his goal is for the Salvation Army to release a statement renouncing CRT in its racial equity push, said he felt a duty to speak out against it and for those who otherwise couldn't speak for themselves.

"If you truly believe that racism is evil—you need to get rid of CRT, which is a racist ideology, assigning certain characteristics to one race and some to others," said Xu.

Added Theroux, who noted the most valuable thing to her while working with the Salvation Army is the learning she's seen "on the ground" by the officers who model Christ's love and action all the time.

"They look at individuals and truly see every one of us, whether you're a board member or someone in need—they do not see the difference between us. That's what's been so personally valuable to me," said Theroux, noting she doesn't see "wokeness" at the level she's working at. "What I see are people who have dedicated their lives."

"The Salvation Army I know is doing extremely good work, given that I do have concerns about this messaging I see," she added. "Again, I love the Army and I don't want to see it hurt. It's like when you have a friend and they're doing something silly—you feel the need to correct them."

Salvation Army's Donors Withdraw Support in Response to Racial 'Wokeness' Initiative (msn.com)
Boy hey, I had my curser sitting over the above article, when SB told me of your post. Beat me to it. And it's from Newsweek so validates the OP.

Seriously, y'all thought it was only in the Methodist Church in Atlanta?

While this does surprise me, I mean really surprise me, it has now become evident that wokeness, and liberalism reaches into the all hierarchy of ORGANIZED religion. Meaning there are good people in them all, so only criticizing the organization.

It's beginning to look a lot like.........all organized religions are now the church of Laodicea, and the appeal is made to the individual.

The only thing I can say is to maybe do your giving to those in your community that need help, in the form of food, blankets etc. That might be where it needs to be anyway, instead of relying on an organization to do it for you. Just saying, not berating anyone.

While Sarmatians Purse may be carrying the torch now, I figure in time, it too, will go woke.

You also might consider St. Jude. Have no idea about their wokeness, but for now it's all about helping children with diseases. Just a thought.

The Salvation Army was the only organization we gave to, but we are done. I have put my foot down. May have to follow my own advice.
 

RememberGoliad

Senior Member
...I'm considering asking the grocery store manager to remove the nuisance bell ringer outside the store who's collecting money to support an anti-white, racist organization that promulgates CRT....
Now, if enough places were to get pressure to do THAT, it might just make an impression, since that would impede their shakedown more than any other karenesque screeching at bell ringers etc.


Whites need their own charities, funded by them and BENEFITS given only to other Whites.

Leftist heads would explode.

Can Catholic Charities be far beyond?
vK, Catlick Charities is one of, if not the biggest of, the movers and shakers behind organizing and expediting the massive flow from the RGV through San Antonio/Houston and on to points north. They are decidedly NOT acting to support the CITIZENry.
 

Walrus

Veteran Member
So the bell ringers are hired? I thought they were volunteers.
They are in our neck of the woods, so telling them off doesn't do anything to the people at the top. No sense shooting the messengers who are standing out in the cold trying to help people. Maybe bell ringers are hired in urban areas; I dunno.

The people at the top who are instigating this aren't going to miss a paycheck, but there's lots of needy people who aren't going to get a meal, a shower and a warm place to sleep this winter because of these jackholes.

The other thing I noticed is that I didn't know what was this Central Nova News organization which printed this story. I still don't know because their website doesn't seem to have an "About Us" section, but they appear to be a Catholic-based outfit.

This kind of makes me wonder if there wasn't a nefarious reason for them to be posting about this subject. Could they be trying to drive money to Catholic Charities? I'm sure their donations have been down significantly in the past couple of years because of the publicity surrounding their involvement up to their elbows in the illegal immigration mess.
 

CaryC

Veteran Member
They are in our neck of the woods, so telling them off doesn't do anything to the people at the top. No sense shooting the messengers who are standing out in the cold trying to help people. Maybe bell ringers are hired in urban areas; I dunno.

The people at the top who are instigating this aren't going to miss a paycheck, but there's lots of needy people who aren't going to get a meal, a shower and a warm place to sleep this winter because of these jackholes.

The other thing I noticed is that I didn't know what was this Central Nova News organization which printed this story. I still don't know because their website doesn't seem to have an "About Us" section, but they appear to be a Catholic-based outfit.

This kind of makes me wonder if there wasn't a nefarious reason for them to be posting about this subject. Could they be trying to drive money to Catholic Charities? I'm sure their donations have been down significantly in the past couple of years because of the publicity surrounding their involvement up to their elbows in the illegal immigration mess.
Need to read more in the thread. Original article appeared in "Newsweek", which is secular. And they have been reporting on this for several months. It's just now coming to our attention.

It's good to be cautious about news articles, but also need to watch and see if someone has already done the leg work on it. Because you ain't the only one that is cautious about articles.
 
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