Help Questions on the use of Clorox sanitizing wipes

Siskiyoumom

Veteran Member
I just started teaching in a new to me school. The employees are addicted to using Clorox or Lysol sanitizing wipes in the classroom. The smell of them makes me ill. At my last school, we were forbidden as teachers to use them, and I am trying to find health and safety rules in California on the use of such products in classrooms. The sole janitor is pissed that I told her daughter who is my aide to not use them. Thanks for any help you have in this matter. Yes, I just spent an hour googling for information, so if you can steer me to a resource that would be great.
 

kyrsyan

Veteran Member
I use them for some things. But I discovered that they no longer have bleach in them. So now I take small microfiber clothes, make a roll of them, and reuse the containers. I just pour in a cup of Clorox with bleach.
You could probably try this with a water, vinegar, EO mix. For a classroom, I'd probably use Thieves Oil.
 

ShadowMan

Crusty ol' Codger
We called my mother the "Lysol Lady" because she 'Lysol'ed' EVERYTHING on cleaning day. Our home was probably cleaner than an operating room. If Lysol was going to kill us we'd have been dead a long time ago. Her second favorite cleaning agent was bleach....ugh!! Can't stand the smell of that stuff!!
 

Kathy in FL

Has No Life - Lives on TB
The "wipes" rarely work because of the reality of how long it takes for the wipes to be as effective as claimed.

First, the "wipes" have to be really wet … wet enough that they actually leave liquid behind on the areas they are wiping.

Second, there is a required length of time that the wet area has to remain wet for the disinfection to be effective (minimum of four minutes). Most people don't follow through on this part at all.

Plus after the four minutes of being fully wet they are then supposed to air dry.

The surface being wiped plays a roll as well. Porous or surfaces that are "sealed" cannot be effective cleaned by disinfecting wipes, even following directions to a T.

If a surface is touched while it is still wet, or before it has been allowed to fully air dry on its own, you have to start all over again.

And as mentioned by others, those wipes don't have bleach in them these days, just a combination of potentially asthma and cancer inducing chemicals.

 

Krayola

Veteran Member
But I discovered that they no longer have bleach in them.
This is correct. I always look on the container to confirm what it will kill because you can't assume those wipes will disinfect everything. For example, if you are dealing with norovirus, none of those sanitizing wipes will kill it.
Some of the generic brands do not kill the bug that causes strep either. So I always check the label.

(This is also true for bleach. Not all bleach will disinfect. Read labels.)

Regarding the OP's question (even though this is old) I would call the old school, especially if you know anyone still there who you are on good terms with and just explain that you thought it was a great policy that you'd like to enact at your new school and ask if there was any medical info to support it.
 

2DEES

Contributing Member
I just started teaching in a new to me school. The employees are addicted to using Clorox or Lysol sanitizing wipes in the classroom. The smell of them makes me ill. At my last school, we were forbidden as teachers to use them, and I am trying to find health and safety rules in California on the use of such products in classrooms. The sole janitor is pissed that I told her daughter who is my aide to not use them. Thanks for any help you have in this matter. Yes, I just spent an hour googling for information, so if you can steer me to a resource that would be great.
Many many years ago when I was concerned with H5N1 and the like I discovered Simple Green Pro 3 in gallon jugs and put 2 ounces in a gallon of water. I would say dampen a rag and wipe the desired surface. I bought it at Home Depot. Forgot how much? It is effective against E-Coli, HIV-1,Herpes Simplex Type-1, Strep Aureus and Pyogenes. Salmonella and other bacteria and viruses. Used in Kitchens, bathrooms,Cafeterias,Hospitals, Schools,Day care centers,and office buildings. Has no odder that I could detect. It's a Disinfectant, Virucidal and Fungicidal solution. I didn't list all the things it's effective against. Some of it is printed on the label. Recommended application time is the only drawback I see- 5 to 10 minutes. They recommend a spray bottle but do not breath the spray. I don,t know if this is suitable for your use but you can check it out and then decide.
 

Siskiyoumom

Veteran Member
2DEES, and the rest who responded thank you. I decided to not rock the boat. Now that school is closed to visitors, students and the public, I have been using hot soapy water followed by a bleach water solution.
 

bethshaya

Veteran Member
I grew up in an Italian home. Like the "Lysol Lady" mom above, mine was the Bleach Lady. Back then, Clorox wasnt a household name. The brand back then was "Javel" in Europe. So in her Italian accent, she would be "Javel-ing" the house. Dishes every night were done with bleach, soap and water, call counters, stove, floors,.....everything. I survived.

I do have to say though, the family rarely got sick. "Perfect Attenance" almost every year at school. I do the same with my home now (not as crazy as she was, but still clean with it) and in turn, my son has also had years of perfect attendance and now as an adult, at work.
 
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