CORONA Navy Captain Pleads for Help with Coronavirus-Infected Aircraft Carrier

Millwright

Knuckle Dragger
_______________
A Navy captain commanding the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt is reportedly asking his commanders to allow his sailors off the ship to self-quarantine while docked in Guam.
The San Francisco Chronicle reported Capt. Brett Crozier wrote in a memo to superiors dated March 30 that the crew is “unable to comply” with Centers for Disease Control protocols or previous Navy guidance to quarantine or social distance for 14 days.
The Chronicle reported that more than 150 sailors from the carrier are infected, though none have been hospitalized yet. According to the captain’s memo, a small contingent have been off-boarded, but most of the ship’s more than 4,000 sailors remain aboard.
“Due to a warship’s inherent limitation of space, we are not doing this. The spread of the disease is ongoing and accelerating,” he reportedly wrote.
The memo allegedly criticized an “inappropriate focus on testing” in response to Navy leaders’ push to test everyone aboard the ship. “Testing has no direct influence on the spread of the COVI19 virus. It merely confirms the presence of the virus,” he wrote.
“Testing will only be useful as the ship returns to work after isolation or quarantine to confirm the effectiveness of the quarantine period,” he wrote.
He wrote of the first 33 sailors who tested positive, seven of those were negative on a first test, then began feeling symptoms one to three days later. He said based on that, approximately 21 percent of those who may test negative on the Roosevelt could be going on to infect others.
Crozier also wrote that current off-ship quarantine areas are also inappropriate and not in compliance with Navy guidance:
Of the off ship locations currently available, only one complies with the NAVADMIN guidance. Infected Sailor reside in these off ship locations. Two Sailors have already tested positive in an open bay gymnasium equipped with cots. Although marginally better than a warship, group quarantine sites are not a solution and are not in accordance with current guidance.
He wrote both the CDC and Navy guidance recommends against group quarantine. Despite that, he said both aboard and ashore, large amounts of sailors are in a confined space; they share open berthing, restroom facilities, workspaces and computers, eating areas, and food is cooked or provided by exposed personnel.
He wrote there are also mandatory tasks demanding consistent close contact, and movement aboard the ship requires close contact with other exposed individuals.
He wrote the current strategy is to move some sailors off the ship, increase the frequency of cleaning the ship, and attempted social distancing. It will “only slow the spread,” he wrote.
“The current plan in execution on TR will not achieve virus eradication on any timeline,” he wrote.
He wrote that there are “two end states” for the Roosevelt. “Maximize warfighting readiness and capacity to as quickly as possible. No timeline necessary. We go to war with the force we have and fight sick. We never achieve a COVID-free TR. There will be losses to the virus.”
Or, he wrote: “Achieve a COVID-free TR. Requires strict adherence to CDC guidelines and a methodical approach to achieve a clean ship. This requires immediate and decisive action. It will take time and money.”
Crozier wrote that since a “war is not imminent, we recommend pursuing the peace time end state.”
Every Sailor onbaord must be guaranteed virus-free and the ship environment must be disinfected. One infected Sailor introduced to the ship will spread the virus. Off ship lodging in compliance with CDC and NAVADMIN guidance is required for over 4,000 Sailors to achieve a clean ship and crew.
He recommended leaving 10 percent of the crew onboard to run the reactor plant, sanitize the ship, ensure security, and provide contingency response for emergencies.
“Removing the majority of personnel from a deployed U.S. nuclear aircraft carrier and isolating them for two weeks may seem like an extraordinary measure,” he wrote. “This is a necessary risk.”
“Keeping over 4,000 young men and women on board the TR is an unnecessary risk and breaks faith with those Sailors entrusted to our care,” he noted.
Breitbart News reached out to the Navy for a statement but did not receive an immediate response.

 

Lone_Hawk

Resident Spook
I have red flags waving on this report.

1. Such a report from the Captain would have been highly classified.
2. The Captain's report being made public significantly risks our national defense posture.
3. Granted, the Captain is right to be concerned, but taking the TR down to 10% manning eliminates her from any combat readiness.
 

bw

Fringe Ranger
Just because it was posted as one post amungst 40,000 other posts in the main corona virus thread doesn't make it a dupe. Hell, I don't even click on that thread because it has run a muck. This post deserves to stand on its own.
Far as I'm concerned you're free to post it any number if times. I was just pointing out it was a dup. You're right, it probably does deserve a bigger exposure. Carry on.
 

Bubble Head

Has No Life - Lives on TB
I assumed they had already done this without publication. Anderson is a big air base in Guam. Could easily fly in portable isolation units and decontamination crews. Set them up right on the base. Reactors must be manned at all times but we have enough trained personnel to set a rotation watch in PPE. They train for this crap.
 

Housecarl

On TB every waking moment
I have red flags waving on this report.

1. Such a report from the Captain would have been highly classified.
2. The Captain's report being made public significantly risks our national defense posture.
3. Granted, the Captain is right to be concerned, but taking the TR down to 10% manning eliminates her from any combat readiness.
Possible dis-info "rope a dope"?.....
 

L.A.B.

Has No Life - Lives on TB
Post 89,794 in The M/Law thread, 6/paragraphs down I touched on this potential on Thursday March 26th.

Has this story grown legs of validation yet, or is it still unknown?
 

night driver

ESFP adrift in INTJ sea
Subs now have 2 Crews, a Blue Crew and a Gold Crew. They alternate. During Summer Pulse (whichever year that was) ALL of the subs on patrol arranged to swap crews on the fly. Yes, the crews are COMPLETE.
The GOAL is to be able to swap crews at pretty much a moments' notice because sometimes we NEED the sub to NOT stop and change crews in a homeport. Can't take the sub out of the game for that long.

And someone else will clean that up for me. But it's basically close.
 
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night driver

ESFP adrift in INTJ sea
And for the record, wholely aside from the need to have an extra 3000 Officers and WELL trained Ratings I LOVE the idea for Capital Ships. (Of which we only have Carriers IIRC)
 

auxman

Ad eundum quo nemo ante iit...
Subs now have 2 Crews, a Blue Crew and a GOLD Crew. They alternate. During Summer Pulse (whichever year that was) ALL of the subs on patrol arranged to swap crews on the fly. Yes, the crews are COMPLETE.
The GOAL is to be able to swap crews at pretty much a moments' notice because sometimes we NEED the sub to NOT stop and change crews in a homeport. Can't take the sub out of the game for that long.

And someone else will clean that up for me. But it's basically close.
Fast attack submarines have ONE crew (approximately 120).
 

Intestinal Fortitude

at least 6' away
I have red flags waving on this report.

1. Such a report from the Captain would have been highly classified.
2. The Captain's report being made public significantly risks our national defense posture.
3. Granted, the Captain is right to be concerned, but taking the TR down to 10% manning eliminates her from any combat readiness.
He is playing bait for the Norks and China.......
 

night driver

ESFP adrift in INTJ sea
Before everyone yells red flags, might be good to see what this 4-striper has been granted authority over or tasked with. NB the Blue Ridge, LCC 19 in there. One of the most unique craft floated by the navy. The man HAS to know how to navigate the winding paths found in Eschelons Above Reality.




CAPT Brett Elliott Crozier, USN
Commanding Officer


Captain Crozier, a native of Santa Rosa, California, graduated from the United States Naval Academy in 1992 and was designated a Naval Aviator in 1994.

Following completion of flight training, he was assigned to HSL-37 in Barbers Point, Hawaii, as a SH-60B Seahawk pilot. He deployed on board USS Crommelin (FFG 37) and USS Fletcher (DD 992) in support of operations in the Pacific Ocean and Operation Southern Watch in the Arabian Gulf.

Captain Crozier then reported to Navy Personnel Command in 1999 as an aviation detailer and retention program manager. Following this tour, he completed an aircraft transition to the F/A-18 Hornet and in 2002 reported to VFA-97 in Lemoore, Calif. While assigned to the ‘Warhawks,’ he deployed with USS Nimitz (CVN 68) in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) in 2003.

In 2004, Captain Crozier reported to VFA-94 as a department head and deployed with the ‘Mighty Shrikes’ on board Nimitz in 2005 again in support of OIF. Captain Crozier was assigned to VFA-125 in 2006 and served as an instructor and FRS Operations Officer. Following this tour with the ‘Rough Raiders,’ he reported in 2007 to the Naval War College and earned a Master’s Degree in National Security and Strategic Studies.

In August 2010, Captain Crozier completed an assignment as the Commanding Officer of VFA-94 in Lemoore. During this tour, he led his squadron on successful expeditionary deployments with Marine Aircraft Group 12 based out of MCAS Iwakuni, Japan, in support of Pacific operations and the Global War on Terror.

Following command, Captain Crozier reported to Naval Striking and Support Forces NATO in Naples, Italy and served as the Lead Air Planner for Joint Task Force Odyssey Dawn and Combined Joint Task Force Deputy Director of Targeting for NATO’s Operation Unified Protector.

In April 2014, Captain Crozier completed the Naval Nuclear Power training program and served as the Executive Officer of USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) until July 2016. During this tour the Reagan took part in RIMPAC 2014, two maintenance availabilities, the forward deployment to Yokosuka, Japan to relieve the USS George Washington (CVN 73) as the Nation’s only forward deployed aircraft carrier, and several FDNF deployments in the PACOM AOR.

Captain Crozier assumed command of the USS Blue Ridge (LCC 19) in Yokosuka, Japan in June of 2017.

=========================================================================

He wasn't EXACTLY "Fast-Tracked" but he wasn't slow-walked either.
 

night driver

ESFP adrift in INTJ sea
From Commander Salamander:

Wednesday, April 01, 2020

CO of CVN-71 Makes the Call & Goes Public


Simply one of the more remarkable moments for a contemporary navy leader I have seen in awhile.

Captain Brett Crozier, USN, Commanding Officer of the USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71), is doing exactly what we have wanted our leaders to do since we started this blog.

Read his full 4-page letter with a few of my thoughts sprinkled here and there over at USNIBlog and tell me what you think.



From the link to USNIBlog:


(See other links embed at USNIBlog link, including the full letter.)

“Our Sailors are our greatest asset.”


“We look after our people.”


“We are not at war. Sailors do not need to die.”
That last quote, what does it remind you of?


To me, it sounds like what we were telling ourselves after the deaths of our Sailors – tired, at the tail end of compounded corner cutting, assuming the risk at sea for PPT slides ashore, and doing a questionable mission … because.


We are, on balance, a navy at peace. Have we changed where we place risk yet?

What must a navy and its leaders do in peace? How do you measure a leader’s broader understanding of his responsibilities to his Navy and his Sailors?


What is most important in a navy at peace? Where do you draw a line between one priority or another?


How long do you wait to be told what is right from on high, and given your responsibilities, when do you step forward to do what is right on your own?


Are the rewards being offered to you worth or worthy of actions on your part to achieve them? Should decisions be made for rewards, or in spite of them?


Are these rewards, offered by imperfect people with imperfect information – distant – right, proper, appropriate, and germane to your unit; your Sailors; your conscious …today?


Is there a reward for callousness, or a punishment for virtue – or on the other side of that coin?


Does it matter?


When do you make the call and let men and time judge as they may when they wish – and be damned one way or another?


We have a benchmark this week to answer some of those questions.


I offer to you Captain Brett Crozier, USN, Commanding Officer of the USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71).


His BLUF is some of the most precise prose by a contemporary Navy leader I have read in … a while.


BLUF: If required the USS THEODORE ROOSEVELT would embark all assigned Sailors, set sail, and be ready to fight and beat any adversary that dares challenge the US or our allies. The virus would certainly have an impact, but in combat we are willing to take certain risks that are not acceptable in peacetime. However, we are not at war, and therefore cannot allow a single Sailor to perish as a result of this pandemic unnecessarily. Decisive action is required now in order to comply with CDC and NAVADMIN 083/20 guidance and prevent tragic outcomes.
The whole of his 4-page letter is here,


… we are not at war, and therefore cannot allow a single Sailor to perish as a result of this pandemic unnecessarily.
With apologies to Hillel, the rest is commentary.


Let’s continue to read;


TR is unable to comply with CDC protocols or NAVADMIN 083/20 guidance. … Due to a warship’s inherent limitations of space, we are not doing this. The spread of the disease is ongoing and accelerating.
Viruses do not care who you are. They don’t care what some distant person’s deployment plan is. They unquestionably don’t care what color a dot is on someone’s readiness slide is.


There is really no other path forward. Imperfect as all other plans, the Skipper of the TR is picking the best way forward and I hope our Navy supports him 100%.


We can do this, the logic is clear.


As war is not imminent, we recommend pursuing the peace time end state.
TR has two primary goals in order to achieve that end state:
a. Prevent unnecessary deaths, reduce the number of Sailors that contract and eliminate ?lture virus spread.
b. Regain and maximize warfighting readiness and capacity as quickly as possible.

Decisive action is required. Removing the majority of personnel from a deployed US. nuclear aircraft carrier and isolating them for two weeks may seem like an extraordinary measure. A portion of the crew (approximately 10%) would have to stay aboard to run the reactor plant, sanitize the ship, ensure security, and provide for contingency response to emergencies. This is a necessary risk. It will enable the carrier and air wing to get back underway as quickly as possible while ensuring the health and safety of our Sailors. Keeping over 4,000 young men and women on board the TR is an unnecessary risk and breaks faith with those Sailors entrusted to our care.
There are challenges associated with securing individualized lodging for our crew. This will require a political solution but it is the right thing to do. We are not at war. Sailors do not need to die. If we do not act now, we are failing to properly take care of our most trusted asset, our Sailors.
Take time to read this remarkable document. You can get the PDF here.


Take the risk Navy.


We are not at war. Sailors do not need to die.
BZ Skipper.


BZ.
 

Publius

TB Fanatic
I can understand the problem as there is limited space on board to separate for a crew of 2500 to 3000 the ships infirmary ( hospital ) can only handle a few people maybe 10 at a time. The problem is people in D.C. are not on board with this.
 

et2

Veteran Member
This what happens when snowflakes get control. Our military is turned into a political pawn for “all” to see.
 
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Millwright

Knuckle Dragger
_______________
I would guess that command made a numerical decision.

The virus is 3% fatal, that's acceptable "training losses".
 

jward

passin' thru
April 2, 2020, 3:23 PM CDT / Updated April 2, 2020, 4:32 PM CDT
By Courtney Kube

The Navy announced it has relieved the captain who sounded the alarm about an outbreak of COVID-19 aboard the USS Theodore Roosevelt.
Image: Capt. Brett Crozier of the USS Theodore Roosevelt.
Capt. Brett Crozier of the USS Theodore Roosevelt.U.S. Navy
Capt. Brett Crozier, who commands the Roosevelt, an aircraft carrier with a crew of nearly 5,000, was be relieved of his command on Thursday, but keep his rank and remain in the Navy.

Crozier raised the alarm earlier this week that sailors on the ship need to be quarantined to stop the spread of the virus. His plea for assistance quickly made headlines.
Crozier sent a letter to the Navy on Monday begging for help addressing the coronavirus outbreak aboard his ship, which was forced to dock in Guam last week. The ship leadership began testing everyone on board. By Wednesday, there were 93 positive test results and more than 1,000 people had departed the ship into isolation on Guam. In total, 2,700 people are expected to disembark the ship this week, with a smaller crew remaining to maintain the ship.
The move was announced in a briefing by Acting Secretary of the Navy Thomas Modly Thursday evening. The official reason for Crozier's relief of duty is a loss of trust and confidence, according to the officials who spoke to NBC News.
 

bw

Fringe Ranger
Do we have any indication that he leaked the letter? Or is this a typical bureaucratic sacrifice, now that the letter is out?
 

Hfcomms

EN66iq
Trump needs to step in and reverse this. That officer was willing to put his career on the line to protect his crew. The brass is upset because he made them look bad. Too many officers are too concerned with covering their asses instead of protecting their people. He made his requests and recommendations to his superiors and thru the chain of command and it got leaked. Don’t know who leaked it but this officer is the type you want to serve under. Way too many are ‘perfumed princes’ just looking to brown nose and get promoted.
 

night driver

ESFP adrift in INTJ sea
What HF just said.

You might note that I DID point out that he had just kissed his Flag bye-bye.
I HATE when I'm right like that.

AND:

Yes I'd follow this guy ANY DAMNED PLACE HE WANTED ME TO FOLLOW (or GO if he sent me!)

I assure you, that, as effing independent and contrary as I am (and yes I DO have a bull head carved from some PRIME knotty pine) I can't say that about a lot of folks.

You Horsey Types might call me hammer-headed.

:prfl:
 

NHGUNNER

Contributing Member
Trump needs to step in and reverse this. That officer was willing to put his career on the line to protect his crew. The brass is upset because he made them look bad. Too many officers are too concerned with covering their asses instead of protecting their people. He made his requests and recommendations to his superiors and thru the chain of command and it got leaked. Don’t know who leaked it but this officer is the type you want to serve under. Way too many are ‘perfumed princes’ just looking to brown nose and get promoted.
We probably won't know the whole truth, but from the article it doesn't sound like he went through his chain of command. Maybe they are just spinning it.

Speaking at a news conference Thursday evening, Acting Navy Secretary Thomas Modly said Crozier was removed from his post because he sent the letter over "non-secure unclassified email" to a "broad array of people" rather than up the chain of command.
"I have no doubt in my mind that Captain Crozier did what he thought was in the best interest of the safety and well-being of his crew," Modly said. "Unfortunately, it did the opposite. It unnecessarily raised the alarm of the families of our sailors and Marines with no plans to address those concerns."
 

WalknTrot

Veteran Member
He panicked.
He didn't follow chain of command.
He endangered his ship and crew by deliberately airing a readiness problem to the whole freeking world.
He's now scrubbing toilets or out on his keister.

Now the Navy has to dust itself off and take care of business...after this donkey made a bad situation miles worse.
 

Bubble Head

Has No Life - Lives on TB
Wrong WalknTrot. He showed a bunch of tight panty Bridge Pussies what a real Captain is and what it means to go into harms way. They are so use to Obama rules he had to go. Just like SEALS who do there job or any number of our military members who just take care o business and Damn the Torpedoes. We are at War plain and simple. Both from within and out.
I would follow that Captain any day.
 

questionable1

Contributing Member
He should be in jail.
Running to the media isn't brave or leadership. What would happen f every sailor on a boat started leaking to the media because they don't think their boss knows what he's doing.
 
Do we have any indication that he leaked the letter? Or is this a typical bureaucratic sacrifice, now that the letter is out?
This whole thing is a freaking mess. Do we know, for a fact and without a doubt that the Captain personally and intentionally leaked the letter? Or did someone in his lower Chain of Command leak it? I wish we knew what was really going on here, this might be a bigger problem than what it seems..........
edit - the leaking and disinformation might be a problem, we already know the china virus is a problem.
 

WalknTrot

Veteran Member
I t
Wrong WalknTrot. He showed a bunch of tight panty Bridge Pussies what a real Captain is and what it means to go into harms way. They are so use to Obama rules he had to go. Just like SEALS who do there job or any number of our military members who just take care o business and Damn the Torpedoes. We are at War plain and simple. Both from within and out.
I would follow that Captain any day.
Thinking you may have misplaced the label "Bridge Pussie" .
Seems to me it belongs on the head of the guy who got bounced.
 

rbt

Contributing Member
The Navy’s rule is if something is wrong it’s somebody’s fault, in this case virus on ship Captians fault the rest is obvious.
 

raven

Veteran Member
In the first round of the war, the enemy has taken out an aircraft carrier without firing a shot.
the commander simply look fear in the eyes and surrendered.
 
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