Misc July 20th Poolside Chat

packyderms_wife

Neither here nor there.
It's just too hot here right now to think about fire, even a bonfire! Louisiana is getting slammed with Hurricane Barry which has caused a system to stall out over most of the midwest leaving us with high temps and high humidity!

So what am I up to this week? Making a portable screenprinting table so I can screenprint fabric with indigo and other natural dyes out of doors. This is the perfect time to take advantage of the high times and dye some fabric, yarn, and threads. Hopefully soon I'll have some cucumbers to turn into sweet pickle relish.

What will you be working on this week?
 

Jacki

Contributing Member
Too hot to knit, so been doing more cross stitching. I usually have several in rotation, Jesus at thirty three, the 2019 stitch along from linen and thread, + a couple of others. The stitch along is 28 stitches an inch, and Jesus at thirty three is 25 stitches an inch. Which means I have to mix them with patterns that require less eye strain. I really love how they look when done that fine, but really hate how my eyes feel If i work too long on that many stitches per inch. My biggest issue is that I get working and lose track of time until I can hardly see.

Jacki
 

packyderms_wife

Neither here nor there.
Too hot to knit, so been doing more cross stitching. I usually have several in rotation, Jesus at thirty three, the 2019 stitch along from linen and thread, + a couple of others. The stitch along is 28 stitches an inch, and Jesus at thirty three is 25 stitches an inch. Which means I have to mix them with patterns that require less eye strain. I really love how they look when done that fine, but really hate how my eyes feel If i work too long on that many stitches per inch. My biggest issue is that I get working and lose track of time until I can hardly see.

Jacki
Do you use one of those lighted magnifying rings to ease stress on your eyes?
 

Jacki

Contributing Member
Yes, but my light burned out. Have replacements coming next week. But the magnifying lamp only helps so much. Jesus at TT has 75 colors, and many of the colors are very close in tone, color and value. The finished work looks more like a painting than needle work.

Another cross stitch designer I love is Theresa Wentzler. I have done several of her designs, and most have blended colors. They are wonderful designs, but most definitely NOT for the faint of heart. I have her peacock pattern on my to do list....
I think l need to live to at least 100 to finish all the WIPs, and my to do list.

Jacki
 

packyderms_wife

Neither here nor there.
Yes, but my light burned out. Have replacements coming next week. But the magnifying lamp only helps so much. Jesus at TT has 75 colors, and many of the colors are very close in tone, color and value. The finished work looks more like a painting than needle work.

Another cross stitch designer I love is Theresa Wentzler. I have done several of her designs, and most have blended colors. They are wonderful designs, but most definitely NOT for the faint of heart. I have her peacock pattern on my to do list....
I think l need to live to at least 100 to finish all the WIPs, and my to do list.

Jacki

I know a couple of stitchers that wear jewelers glasses in addition to the magnifying ring.
 

rosepath

Member
This week: cutting up cotton Oxford plaid shirts (mens' XXL are terrific) for rag rugs on the loom; weaving some cotton runners, and doing some sewing examples. We plan to teach a sewing class for ages 11 + at church this fall, the basics of hand stitches, simple machine stitching, sewing on buttons, etc. So getting some of the possibilities for projects made up ahead of time. All this is pretty indoor-oriented. But in the mornings and evenings, cooler weather, so spinning on the front porch or side-yard porch swing. With the help of the cats, of course :)
A question for other spinners: just brought home a bargain Ashford traditional, 70's model, and it will be fine with some cleaning and TLC, but the metal shaft that holds bobbins is corroded. What should I use to clean it up without scratching it? Maybe fine-grit sanding block? Suggestions welcome for sure, I'm not very experienced with working with metal.
 

Faroe

Veteran Member
I know a couple of stitchers that wear jewelers glasses in addition to the magnifying ring.
I put a pair of cheap readers over my regular eye glasses. Still a strain on the eyes, however. Found a video with a lady wearing a small lamp around her neck - the light is always right where you need it. I couldn't figure out if she was running it on a battery, or was plugged in.

____
Rosepath, you might try some fine steel wool. I'm not familiar with wheels, but AFAIK, Ashford's are easy to get spare parts for.
 

packyderms_wife

Neither here nor there.
This week: cutting up cotton Oxford plaid shirts (mens' XXL are terrific) for rag rugs on the loom; weaving some cotton runners, and doing some sewing examples. We plan to teach a sewing class for ages 11 + at church this fall, the basics of hand stitches, simple machine stitching, sewing on buttons, etc. So getting some of the possibilities for projects made up ahead of time. All this is pretty indoor-oriented. But in the mornings and evenings, cooler weather, so spinning on the front porch or side-yard porch swing. With the help of the cats, of course :)
A question for other spinners: just brought home a bargain Ashford traditional, 70's model, and it will be fine with some cleaning and TLC, but the metal shaft that holds bobbins is corroded. What should I use to clean it up without scratching it? Maybe fine-grit sanding block? Suggestions welcome for sure, I'm not very experienced with working with metal.
Steel wool will clean it up nicely. Also check the wood on the wheel to see if it's dried out if so apply a coat of Watco (Sp?) Danish Oil to the wheel. Enjoy your new wheel!
 

Jacki

Contributing Member
I just was on Amazon, looking for T Wentzler patterns. Brilliant Plumage pattern was on sale for 869.56 to 2689.70.

The design is beautiful, but never would I spend that much for two patterns! I already have that pattern, and I KNOW that I didn't pay anywhere near that much.

Jacki
 

Melodi

Disaster Cat
Had a spontaneous tablet weaving class at the SCA event today - good thing I brought the mini-inkle loom because I had managed to warp up a piece of trim I needed for a project on my full-sized one just as I got there, I had two people "really get it" I women over from Austria and a local guy who just got some tablets.

I also managed to finish the trim while guiding them back and forth, I got some spinning down as well (drop spindle) but no one else was interested - it was nearly 80 degrees today which is rare for Ireland and folks making garb for a "Viking Event" usually tend towards wool - thankfully I had my 2001 Cotton Apron Dress and linen underdress which was OK but I spent a lot of time indoors kind of hiding and doing textile work.

Hopefully, my extra shuttles and the repair kit for my Ashford Traveler wheel will get here in a few days, I've got the one shuttle and thankfully someone had an extra for the unexpected class but I really need more than one.

It looks like this week may continue to be warm for here and with no A/C it may be a good week for knitting baby clothing.
 

packyderms_wife

Neither here nor there.
I just was on Amazon, looking for T Wentzler patterns. Brilliant Plumage pattern was on sale for 869.56 to 2689.70.

The design is beautiful, but never would I spend that much for two patterns! I already have that pattern, and I KNOW that I didn't pay anywhere near that much.

Jacki

Link? I gotta see this one!
 

rosepath

Member
packyderms_wife: thanks for the tip, will try this right away.

Melodi, the SCA events sound very interesting. I'm usually involved with 18th century (American) events, but I'd love to see what goes on at Viking events. Both eras probably make people stop and think how very far technology has come, and how blessed we are, but there's something so satisfying about doing things the old way by hand too.
 

Jacki

Contributing Member
I don't know how to link, but if you go to amazon, and look for Theresa Wentzler patterns you will see what I mean.

By the way, it looks like I have a small fortune in patterns...I have several books, and some leaflets of her patterns.

Jacki
 

Seeker22

Veteran Member
Link? I gotta see this one!
Don't get screwed by Jeff (Amazon) go bid on this one now, it's current.

Teresa Wentzler Brilliant Plumage Counted Cross Stitch Kit #40491
Seller : mdimita (257 )
100% Positive feedback
Save this Seller
| Contact seller
| See other items
Item Information
Condition:
New
Time left:
Time left: 4d 19h
Thursday, 1:55PM
Current bid:
US $66.00
[ 18 bids ]

Place bid -
Resume bidding, if the page does not update immediately.

Enter US $67.00 or more


https://www.ebay.com/itm/Teresa-Wentzler-Brilliant-Plumage-Counted-Cross-Stitch-Kit-40491/202731196849?hash=item2f33b891b1:g:8REAAOSwn4FdJ4Vx
 

packyderms_wife

Neither here nor there.
Don't get screwed by Jeff (Amazon) go bid on this one now, it's current.

Teresa Wentzler Brilliant Plumage Counted Cross Stitch Kit #40491
Seller : mdimita (257 )
100% Positive feedback
Save this Seller
| Contact seller
| See other items
Item Information
Condition:
New
Time left:
Time left: 4d 19h
Thursday, 1:55PM
Current bid:
US $66.00
[ 18 bids ]

Place bid -
Resume bidding, if the page does not update immediately.

Enter US $67.00 or more


https://www.ebay.com/itm/Teresa-Wentzler-Brilliant-Plumage-Counted-Cross-Stitch-Kit-40491/202731196849?hash=item2f33b891b1:g:8REAAOSwn4FdJ4Vx
The link I posted was to the same item for $6.95 NOT $67.00.
 

Broken Arrow

Heathen Pagan Witch
Our house is going on the market this week, so around here its been pack, clean, paint, fix, and weed. My entire studio is packed, half at the new house, half in the trailer here. I did keep a drop spindle and a pair of hand combs at the house, but it just doesn't do the trick. I miss my wheels and looms!!!
 

Faroe

Veteran Member
Our house is going on the market this week, so around here its been pack, clean, paint, fix, and weed. My entire studio is packed, half at the new house, half in the trailer here. I did keep a drop spindle and a pair of hand combs at the house, but it just doesn't do the trick. I miss my wheels and looms!!!
I get twitchy if I don't have something in my hands. A crochet hook and some cheap acrylic yarn will do if I have nothing else to work with.
 

Faroe

Veteran Member
Was listening to quilt-as-you-go strip piecing videos while knitting the neck gator. Distracted, that got me scrounging around in the bits-and-pieces fabric stash.

Found: one mostly made black linen skirt. I had completely forgotten about this (what was it doing in there, anyway?), and for the amount of sewing already into it, I have very little memory of actually working on it. Semi-18th Century, made with straight sided rectangles, and the excess pleated into a waist that is finished with a turned over 1"wide cotton tape. I also used cotton tape on the underside for the hem; if you leave a 1/16" or so bit extending beyond the fold, it protects the hem from abrasion, but doesn't show. It has just one slit - what was I thinking? zipper up the back? ....probably, don't recall, and didn't have time to deal with looking closer at it, just then.

Well, good. I could use another skirt. I need to find a zipper.
 

marsh

Has No Life - Lives on TB
I have almost completed all the "blanks" (marked quilt sandwiches) I need for Natalia Bonner's youtube class on ruler work. Been continuing to watch some Bluprint/Craftsy classes on free motion quilting and practicing some new designs like the long swirl and lines with pebbles. I find that what they suggest works - practice with a pen or pencil on a cheap pad of newsprint first to get your mind and muscle memory down first. It makes it much easier to transfer to actual FMQ where you have to make quick decisions or automatic decisions about where to go next.

My supplies for the quilted overnight and computer bags for my daughter's new school year teaching have arrived and I have viewed the step by step classes once. I will likely start the overnight bag this week. (She is teaching 7th-8th grade PE and English.)

Melodi, I have a Schacht Inkle loom and have made a few simple strips. I would love to learn card weaving sometime later this year when I have time.
 

Faroe

Veteran Member
The knitted neck gator is about 1/4 of the way though. Turning out well, so far.

Been distracted by hexagons. Have glued up dozens in various blue florals. We'll see what comes of it...I don't have a plan, just wanted to try some. The only parts of it I spent extra money on so far, were the Dritz Hexies, and the glue pen with a refill. Turns out, one doesn't actually need the rotating cutting mat, or the acrylic cutting template, nor the rotary cutters. Good, cause I don't have that stuff. I have my mother's old 45mm rotaries, but no replacements for the rusty blades. I just used dress shears, and that is fine, the seam allowances only have to approx. 1/4".

I found a video by a Missie of Mid-West Primatives (something like that), who was brushing on a liquid starch, and using a very tiny iron over her shapes. She used doubled up special printer sheet sized freezer for her paper shapes. The quilt she had behind her was really pretty. That technique looks like it might (?) lend itself well to intricate applique cutouts, and one-of-a-kind shapes. She is obviously saving a lot of money on glue stick refills (and she has more control with the starch brush), but I expect she is spending a lot more money on the freezer paper packets. I also liked that with the starch stiffener, she takes out the cardboard before sewing.

Lots of ways to do these, but I need to finish my knitting project.
 

packyderms_wife

Neither here nor there.
The knitted neck gator is about 1/4 of the way though. Turning out well, so far.

Been distracted by hexagons. Have glued up dozens in various blue florals. We'll see what comes of it...I don't have a plan, just wanted to try some. The only parts of it I spent extra money on so far, were the Dritz Hexies, and the glue pen with a refill. Turns out, one doesn't actually need the rotating cutting mat, or the acrylic cutting template, nor the rotary cutters. Good, cause I don't have that stuff. I have my mother's old 45mm rotaries, but no replacements for the rusty blades. I just used dress shears, and that is fine, the seam allowances only have to approx. 1/4".

I found a video by a Missie of Mid-West Primatives (something like that), who was brushing on a liquid starch, and using a very tiny iron over her shapes. She used doubled up special printer sheet sized freezer for her paper shapes. The quilt she had behind her was really pretty. That technique looks like it might (?) lend itself well to intricate applique cutouts, and one-of-a-kind shapes. She is obviously saving a lot of money on glue stick refills (and she has more control with the starch brush), but I expect she is spending a lot more money on the freezer paper packets. I also liked that with the starch stiffener, she takes out the cardboard before sewing.

Lots of ways to do these, but I need to finish my knitting project.
which brand of rotary cutters?

I wish I knew where my Olfa rotary cutter made off to, I like it better than my dritz rotary cutter.
 

Faroe

Veteran Member
Finished glueing a batch of hexies, and have a bunch whip stitched together into a mostly completed *square.*
Quite pretty... not that I can claim creative genius on the outcome; it would be hard to mess up random blue floral patchwork.

Plan is to work the block like a quilt-as-you-go project, as if with joining sashing around each square. NOT interested into launching into a big hand sewing commitment right now, but I would like to see how the hexies finish up fully quilted.
 

Melodi

Disaster Cat
There are a lot of good card weaving videos on Youtube some of them even use the Inkle Looms which makes learning a lot easier, the Sachet is the perfect loom for it too!

A busy week with Nightwolf having a lot of sudden (and needed) dental work done - I cast on a dead-simple hat (flat) k2p2 for the long bus rides, office waits and tonight's overnight in the hotel (he has dental surgery in the morning, under a local but still very early in another town).

I also got some spinning done, the "Ma" wool is almost all spun and needs to be plied.

Also, yesterday my handyman and his friend (with my direction) got most of the new indoor sewing/weaving room bare bones up - my housemate will still need to get the drill bits so we can mount the big warping board on the wall (currently in the old outdoor weaving shed) but we now have a table, sewing machine, iron, small looms and floor loom at least in the room and in places they can be used.

The major challenge now will be to keep family members and the handy man from using the "new" room as a dumping ground for the 20 years of household clutter that is gradually being reduced over the past year but still has months to go.

I keep telling myself it took 22 years and numerous housemates to get this bad and it isn't going to all be sorted overnight.

The only "Issue" with the sewing room is we have no wifi in that part o the house but that may not be a bad thing, in the long run, it was why I had to quit using it as an office when the "new" modems wouldn't work there.
 

Faroe

Veteran Member
Hope your husband is feeling better soon. A wifi-free craft room is a good thing. I sometimes knit in the bedroom, just to get away from the rooms where the computers are set-up.
 

Faroe

Veteran Member
The damn hexies should come with a warning label; they are addicting. I have OTHER stuff I need to do! Oops, a second block is almost completed. On the plus side, I found some fantastic violin music to listen to while stitching, and also a good documentary on the boys' and girls's choir at Salisbury Cathedral in England. Sublime voices.

Need to order another Dritz packet of them. They can be reused, but most of them get folded with stitching. Would also rather not pop them out until I'm ready to frame each of the groups in squares. That will require setting up the iron. Has to be done on the porch, because you can't have teflon heat up indoors around pet birds. (a NON teflon iron has been on the shopping list for some time, but there is still no permanent place to set up a pressing area inside the house.)

Anyway, was perusing the "cake" "jelly roll" "fat quarter," etc. selections on-line, and realized that I never care for most of the prints in the packets. Ended up just looking at 1/2 yard yardage at Missouri Quilt company. I used to order from Hancock's of Paduca, but they take forever to fulfill the order, and I find the website very hard to use for picking out fabric. Customer Service at Missouri Quilt got back to me right away with answers to my questions. So, a bunch of pretty selections in the cart, but most will have to keep until August (budget).
 

summerthyme

Administrator
_______________
Check out www.connectingthreads.com for quilt fabrics. Excellent quality fabrics, not a huge selection (they introduce new "collections" a few a times a year. But they have an excellent array of solids and textures... and their frequent sales are excellent... get on their mailing list or e-mails..,

Summerthyme
 

packyderms_wife

Neither here nor there.
I also get my quilt fabric from Missouri Quilt Company, ill post a link tomorrow, when my local shop doesn’t have what I want!
 

packyderms_wife

Neither here nor there.
Faroe... l8nk or name of the violin music you’re listening to? Thanks. Band yes he is are addicting, I don’t use a glue stick, never heard of that.
 

packyderms_wife

Neither here nor there.
Now I need to find my hexies, and I may as well dig out my yo-yo discs while I’m at it; I hav3 two sizes of hexies one is super small for mini quilts the other is the standard size.
 

Faroe

Veteran Member
The piece was Vivaldi's 4 Seasons, I am unfamiliar with the soloist (and can't remember her name), but really liked her. I'll look for it tomorrow - blazing headache for most of today, and violins don't go with headaches.

Am at the very end of a third block. These are going to be big blocks; I think nine will make a good-sized lap-quilt, after adding borders. Need more fabric. Turns out, Connecting Threads had a few nice prints at half price, and I was able to get out of that e-store in under $20, inc. shipping. (Thank you for the tip, Summerthyme). I'll need more fabric, but that should tide the project over with some extra variety 'till the end of the month (except am nearly out of hexies). I might want to make a bit more of an effort at finishing the 10yr old Irish Chain patchwork before officially launching on another, anyway. Amazing how much more quickly things go the second time around. Pretty piece, but it has always been a painful and slow slog. I did EVERYTHING the hard way.

ETA: watched about a dozen Needham (spell?) videos. I'm surprised she doesn't have more subscribers - she is giving info. on techniques that very few people share in videos. I esp. like the ones where she shows how to create background texture with the grids.
 
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Seeker22

Veteran Member
I have an old comfy Lazy Boy rocker with wooden arms that is set in the perfect place for morning sun. It also happens to be right in front of the air conditioner. I finished my first pair of Vanilla socks (no pattern, just straight garter stitch) from some Superwash pretty purple variegated yarn they call Violas. I started on DPNs and after the cuff was done, slid the work onto a 2mm 9" Addi circular. This stuff is addictive!

I need to get back to Cross Stitch and Cabochon Bead Embroidery, but I can't stop knitting?! Gaaaaa! I had such a time learning the basics and one day, it just all clicked and the light came on and the hands moved the smooth easy way I had dreamed of and wanted so badly.

I have Crocheted for 50+ years so after learning to throw, I discovered Continental style which is knitting more like how you hold crochet. This is the answer. I am doing socks now, but want to get good enough for Lace shawls and Celtic Cable. I'm getting there one amazing stitch at a time.

My Mom crocheted and passed that skill along. She did not knit. I can't imagine what it would be like to begin as a little baby girl as I did with crochet, and be an accomplished knitter by age 12-14. Just wow! Thanks to Youtube videos and learning how to slow the video down, I finally beat knitting into the head. I put down a finished piece in the evening and come back in for coffee the next morning and can't believe that came from my hands. The way the stitches form- German Short Rows/Boomerang or heel flap and gusset for a sock or the curves and points in the edge of a shawl are just mysterious to me. One day it will be easy and boring but today it's fascinating.

The socks in the pic are not mine, but look enough like what I did to be very close.

 

summerthyme

Administrator
_______________
Very nice...and absolutely amazing for a beginning knitter.

I don't know if I'll ever get into hand knitting... maybe this winter I'll try the YouTube thing. I *can* knit... I've got three or four sweaters (and an odd, but pretty and very warm, lace knit vest from some DazzleAire yarn... that shouldn't have worked, but sonehow did... for a first effort, anyway) that I've made over the years. But it just is so slow and awkward I usually get bored and quit before I finish.

I'm with you, though... I sure wish I'd had someone to teach me when I was young. My grandmother did beautiful work (I had a sweater she made until I lost it in our house fire... it was all intertwined cables, even the sleeves. I cant imagine even trying sonething that intricate!), and she taught me to crochet, but I didn't see her much (family issues) and I don't think she had much interest in trying to teach a kid to knit.

Crochet is fast for me... but I've never really liked how it looks. Too "clunky"... and garments don't stretch and fit like knit does.

I really have to get the knitting machine back out when it starts cooling off again.

Oh... this is cute. My granddaughter just turned two. She's been talking in sentences since she was 10 months, sight reading words from 9 months, and knows so much that we sometimes wonder about past lives!

She was visiting last month, and I was entertaining her by letting her look through my bins of fabrics... she is fascinated by the colors and textures. We found a bin of flannel kids prints... cute pastels with animals, etc. She pulled out several pieces, and I showed her how it felt soft on her skin. She giggled, handed me the stack, and said, "grandma make Daphne blanket"

My jaw dropped... she has never seen me (or anyone) sew... when they visit, I usually spend most of our time playing with her or reading with her. I did make a gorgeous quilt for her when she was born, so I thought her parents had probably told her "grandma made that" when they were teaching her the various colors. I asked... nope. Never occurred to them.

So how can this little one look at pieces of fabric and somehow know it could be sewn into a blanket?

She's also an absolute imp! One day (having heard how she was starting to show signs of the terrible twos) I asked her on the phone, "so... are you being a good girl for daddy?" She giggled, and said, "not really, grandma. I run off a lot!"

I'm going to start teaching her the basics of patchwork soon...gotta channel all that energy and amazing brain into productive, positive activity!

Summerthyme
 

Seeker22

Veteran Member
Very nice...and absolutely amazing for a beginning knitter.

I don't know if I'll ever get into hand knitting... maybe this winter I'll try the YouTube thing. I *can* knit... I've got three or four sweaters (and an odd, but pretty and very warm, lace knit vest from some DazzleAire yarn... that shouldn't have worked, but sonehow did... for a first effort, anyway) that I've made over the years. But it just is so slow and awkward I usually get bored and quit before I finish.

I'm with you, though... I sure wish I'd had someone to teach me when I was young. My grandmother did beautiful work (I had a sweater she made until I lost it in our house fire... it was all intertwined cables, even the sleeves. I cant imagine even trying sonething that intricate!), and she taught me to crochet, but I didn't see her much (family issues) and I don't think she had much interest in trying to teach a kid to knit.

Crochet is fast for me... but I've never really liked how it looks. Too "clunky"... and garments don't stretch and fit like knit does.

I really have to get the knitting machine back out when it starts cooling off again.

Oh... this is cute. My granddaughter just turned two. She's been talking in sentences since she was 10 months, sight reading words from 9 months, and knows so much that we sometimes wonder about past lives!

She was visiting last month, and I was entertaining her by letting her look through my bins of fabrics... she is fascinated by the colors and textures. We found a bin of flannel kids prints... cute pastels with animals, etc. She pulled out several pieces, and I showed her how it felt soft on her skin. She giggled, handed me the stack, and said, "grandma make Daphne blanket"

My jaw dropped... she has never seen me (or anyone) sew... when they visit, I usually spend most of our time playing with her or reading with her. I did make a gorgeous quilt for her when she was born, so I thought her parents had probably told her "grandma made that" when they were teaching her the various colors. I asked... nope. Never occurred to them.

So how can this little one look at pieces of fabric and somehow know it could be sewn into a blanket?

She's also an absolute imp! One day (having heard how she was starting to show signs of the terrible twos) I asked her on the phone, "so... are you being a good girl for daddy?" She giggled, and said, "not really, grandma. I run off a lot!"

I'm going to start teaching her the basics of patchwork soon...gotta channel all that energy and amazing brain into productive, positive activity!

Summerthyme
I'm literally knitting in a vacuum, Summer. I have no one to show me, just strangers on the computer. I work and work until it looks right, but don't know what stage I'm at? I would say barely advanced beginner. Thank you so much for your compliments, it means a lot.

I'll try to post my socks that I actually knit soon. I just made an all day prep run and I am hot, tired and just loosened a tooth playing and being silly. Ouch!

I have a simple sleeveless blouse started from DazzleAire almost finished. I love that stuff, so pretty.

Your Granddaughter sounds like she is a double handful- adorable! I bet you get that blanket done for her, too. Sweet memories spent sewing for or with people we love is one of the side benefits of this skill set. I wouldn't miss those times for all the world.
 

Melodi

Disaster Cat
The socks look great!

I didn't get any work done on the simple hat while I was with husband but we did have a lovely evening at the hotel and then his first dental work went pretty well, he's even able to eat today.

Summertyme, if you are feeling very brave, next time your grandaughter does something like she did with the fabrics just ask her "did you make something like this before? or some other related type of question?

She may say something like she doesn't know or something that is obviously fantasy-like "Baby Shark did it" but if she says something like "yes, remember when I was big and you were small" or a similar type of answer then meet me in the Unexplained room (or PM if you like).

Getting back to the Pool Side projects, I'm hoping to wiz through the simple hat and get back to the Baby Surprise Sweater - I love the Baby Surprise sweaters but I have to think about them so I can't carry them around; which this Summer between the hot days (not as bad as last year but unusual for Ireland) and the travel I need mindless projects.

Also spinning wheel repair kit and new shuttles came yesterday, so I may try putting a project on later after my 6 pm client (I need the table for them first).
 
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