SOFT NEWS Impatient pet cow moos loudly at farmer's window every day for morning hug

Dennis Olson

Chief Curmudgeon
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www.foxnews.com /lifestyle/impatient-pet-cow-moos-farmers-window-morning-hug

Impatient pet cow moos loudly at farmer's window every day for morning hug
SWNS
3-3 minutes

Don't have a cow, Jenna!

Don't have a cow, Jenna! (SWNS)

Meet this adorable rescue cow who impatiently moos at a farmer's window - for a hug every morning.

Jenna the dairy cow was destined to be killed because she was born infertile and unable to produce milk.

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But at just three days old, she was taken in by Ryan Phillips, 42, and Mallory Sherman, 34, who run a not-for-profit farmyard sanctuary.

Jenna was just three-days-old when was taken in by Ryan Phillips, 42, and Mallory Sherman, 34, who run a not-for-profit farmyard sanctuary.

Jenna was just three-days-old when was taken in by Ryan Phillips, 42, and Mallory Sherman, 34, who run a not-for-profit farmyard sanctuary. (SWNS)

Phillips nursed and cared for her, building up a strong bond, so Jenna gets very impatient if she doesn't get to greet him first thing each morning.

She makes a beeline for their kitchen window and moos loudly until he comes to say good morning.

An adorable video shows their morning routine, at the farm in Williamsburg, Va.

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Phillips said: "Jenna treats me like I'm her best friend and saw me like I was her mom when she was little because I brought and fed her bottles.

"She'd knock me in my belly to attempt to make more milk come out.

"I spent every night talking and laying with her in the barn and making sure she was healthy and happy.

"And so, now we continue to have a bond that results in her mooing for me and needing morning hugs - as well as lots of time together during the day, and goodnight hugs and scratches as well.

Phillips said: Jenna treats me like I'm her best friend and saw me like I was her mom when she was little because I brought and fed her bottles.

Phillips said: "Jenna treats me like I'm her best friend and saw me like I was her mom when she was little because I brought and fed her bottles." (SWNS)

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"We are truly best friends and she's definitely just as much family as any human could be."

Jenna - nicknamed The Calf Who Lived - was a freemartin, meaning she was unlikely to have babies or produce milk, because she was born a twin, in November 2018.

The dairy farmer planned to cut Jenna's life short, but his daughter asked if she could find a home for them, and contacted one of Phillips' pals, Tia.

Jenna - nicknamed The Calf Who Lived - was a freemartin, meaning she was unlikely to have babies or produce milk, because she was born a twin, in November 2018.

Jenna - nicknamed The Calf Who Lived - was a freemartin, meaning she was unlikely to have babies or produce milk, because she was born a twin, in November 2018. (SWNS)

She came to Life with Pigs Farm Animal Sanctuary, with their other cows, pigs, turkeys, chickens and dogs.

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The clip was filmed at the farm on July 26 by Sherman and features Phillips.

Life With Pigs is a non-profit farm animal sanctuary.
 

Countrymouse

Country exile in the city
My daddy raised calves (among other small-farm activities) so I always had young calves around to play with as a kid.

He'd buy them as newly-weaned calves at the cattle sale auction, keep them a couple of years, then take them back to sell as young bulls for the bigger (meat-based, beef stock) cattlemen's herds or as heifers for the dairymen's.

I'd always pick one of the bunch to be my special "pet" and enjoy it as much as I could until the inevitable day it went back with Daddy to the cattle sale auction here in GA (Cumming) and was sold.

I remember lazy summer days, where the calves were all resting at midday/early afternoon after their morning's grazing, when I'd go lie down with my head resting on the tummy of my then-favorite Angus calf (they're very gentle) and read a book or even fall asleep.

I later had a Holstein heifer named "Star" who was my special pet. She'd come running to the fence to meet me after school every day--and believe me, you've never been kissed till you've been kissed by a calf! (sort of like a cat's rough kiss, multiplied by 20).

Daddy had promised we could keep Star, instead of selling her, but after she was bred she changed; where she had always been gentle and loving around me she became more threatening and aggressive. Daddy (to put it in his words) was "afraid she'd hook me"--so one day I came home from school to discover she was gone from the pasture---Daddy had sold her at the auction.

I was heartbroken. And furious. I loved my Daddy better than anyone in the world, but I tearfully told him in no uncertain terms that he had promised me he was going to keep Star for me, and that I'd never forgive him. Mother had to come to me later to tell me how badly Daddy felt about how upset I was, and to explain how he'd hated to do it but felt he had to, for my safety, before I finally agreed to go make my peace with him. I did ask him if they'd slaughter her, and he assured me no--a pregnant, healthy 2-year old Holstein like that would have gone to a dairy pasture. I hope so. I've never forgotten her.
 

Cacheman

Veteran Member
Jenna the dairy cow was destined to be killed because she was born infertile and unable to produce milk.

But at just three days old, she was taken in by Ryan Phillips, 42, and Mallory Sherman, 34, who run a not-for-profit farmyard sanctuary.
Just a quick FYI,

If you caught the fact she was infertile and wonder how that would be known so early it's because she was a twin with a bull calf and in that case over 95% of heifer calves will be infertile.
 
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