Prep Genrl I just came across this and wanted to share

annieb

Senior Member
I was just on Youtube and saw this guy's site:
www.iceagefarmer.com
He did a presentation called "Brace for Impact: It's about to get worse
by Ice Age Farmer | May 8, 2021 | Podcast

We are staring down the barrel of a confluence of several scenarios–each of which individually is a significant, life-changing event–but which are together conspiring is a dangerous and incendiary situation: food shortages, inflation, and a breakdown of the supply chain. A new media narrative today acknowledges food shortages, and blames animal agriculture, indicating we are reaching an inflection point in the collapse. Expect things to accelerate from here. Let’s have a conversation tonight about where we are, where we’re heading, and how to prepare.

I highly recommend it.
 

Sicario

The Executor
im in the middle of farm country, Nebraska, almost every farmer for miles already has the crops in the ground for this year, so, should be a normal crop this year, mostly corn and soybeans
I hope you're right, but of course someone could order up a drought and mess things up.
 

Shooter

Veteran Member
this is from march 13, but wettest year on record so far , and we got rain all this week,


 

Old Gray Mare

Has No Life - Lives on TB
im in the middle of farm country, Nebraska, almost every farmer for miles already has the crops in the ground for this year, so, should be a normal crop this year, mostly corn and soybeans
Yeah well.... thats nice but its not groceries. Cornmeal mush and textured soy protein will only take the country so far. California was our produce basket. A drought could become an issue.

Local farms and orchards no longer have the ability to supply larger US cities with in season produce or milk and milk products mainly because they've been turned into suburbs. Outside of the Amish communities and homesteaders few people have vegetable gardens and few of those are substantial.

If the trucks with produce stop rolling in from Mexico and elsewhere we have a problem.
 
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RB Martin

Veteran Member
BTTT... It would be nice if the the thread title had some reference to the content...
 
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jward

passin' thru
It's all old news for most of us, but I'm afraid there are no "new" ears to hear, or care.
..which is ok, I guess... :: shrug ::
 

Doc1

Has No Life - Lives on TB
Yeah well.... thats nice but its not groceries. Cornmeal mush and textured soy protein will only take the country so far. California was our produce basket. A drought could become an issue.

Local farms and orchards no longer have the ability to supply larger US cities in season produce mainly because they've been turned into suburbs. Outside of the Amish communities and homesteaders few people have vegetable gardens and few of those are substantial.

If the trucks with produce stop rolling in from Mexico and elsewhere we have a problem.

FWIW, corn mush (grits) topped by a single fried egg (from our chickens) and coffee is my daily breakfast. If we're reduced to corn mush, the Yankees might starve but we in the South will do just fine!

Best
Doc
 

20Gauge

Has No Life - Lives on TB
Yeah well.... thats nice but its not groceries. Cornmeal mush and textured soy protein will only take the country so far. California was our produce basket. A drought could become an issue.

Local farms and orchards no longer have the ability to supply larger US cities in season produce mainly because they've been turned into suburbs. Outside of the Amish communities and homesteaders few people have vegetable gardens and few of those are substantial.

If the trucks with produce stop rolling in from Mexico and elsewhere we have a problem.
We have 5 planters with 120ish sq ft. It is keeping the wife busy as a bee. I can imagine what a larger garden would do.

It is worth it, but it does take time.
 

Doc1

Has No Life - Lives on TB
I like fried mush. Can you do that with grits too?
Yes. Corn mush and grits are different (but similar) products. Either can be fried. In Africa, corn mush is called Mielie meal or meilies and is a staple of the southern African natives diet. Whites will typically offer it as a side dish at bar b ques (braiis).

Best
Doc
 

Walrus

Veteran Member
FWIW, corn mush (grits) topped by a single fried egg (from our chickens) and coffee is my daily breakfast. If we're reduced to corn mush, the Yankees might starve but we in the South will do just fine!
It's the coffee that's going to be the kicker. Can it be grown down in your neck of the woods?
 

Old Gray Mare

Has No Life - Lives on TB
FWIW, corn mush (grits) topped by a single fried egg (from our chickens) and coffee is my daily breakfast. If we're reduced to corn mush, the Yankees might starve but we in the South will do just fine!

Best
Doc
You might be surprised to find out this Yankee loves grits and cornmeal mush with maple syrup and butter. For newbies, there is a difference between the two. Hominy grits have been treated with lye to remove the outer hull off of the corn kernel. Then its rinsed repeatedly, dried and ground.

Problem is I don't want to eat GMO corn treated with cancer causing chemicals so I eat it sparingly. It doesn't take a degree from Harvard to crush dried corn into meal and boil it till soft. I just want it to be organic.

The US has a long row to hoe to get back to food self sufficiency. Anyone who thinks the US government has big storehouses of food for the people like it did back after WWII? Forget it. Earl butz ended that program decades ago. In famine the government is not coming to our rescue.
 
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Doc1

Has No Life - Lives on TB
It's the coffee that's going to be the kicker. Can it be grown down in your neck of the woods?
I don't think anyone grows coffee in the Deep South, but during the Civil War, southern troops used roasted and ground chicory as a coffee substitute. To this day, regional blends of coffee and chicory are still sold. I'm happy to drink the blends, though I've never tried pure chicory.

Best
Doc
 

Old Gray Mare

Has No Life - Lives on TB
I don't think anyone grows coffee in the Deep South, but during the Civil War, southern troops used roasted and ground chicory as a coffee substitute. To this day, regional blends of coffee and chicory are still sold. I'm happy to drink the blends, though I've never tried pure chicory.

Best
Doc
It's grown in Hawaii and probably could be grown in the US Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico and the tip of southern Florida.
 

Satanta

Stone Cold Crazy
_______________
im in the middle of farm country, Nebraska, almost every farmer for miles already has the crops in the ground for this year, so, should be a normal crop this year, mostly corn and soybeans
With people refusing to work, busienesses closed or closing

Transport and shipping breaking down and needed parts becoming hard to either find or get

How are they going to get that to market perzaxtky?

Here is an example from my side. I was looking for a specific post hole digger. The one I wanted was on Delay at Amazon but the local Ace could order it and get it to me in a week. After week I get a call it was not in and it should be in the following week.

Following week...Crickets. Go by Ace and they look it up, telling me they were having all sorts of issues with the Ace Waehouse.

Nada. Showss it was ordered then nothing.

Got money back and went on Azon and ordered a slightly different version.

Was supposed to arrive the 4th. Come the 4th and got mssg shipment was late.

Followed Tracking-it was stuck in Customs for two days [[coming from Great Britain]] then to Cincinatti where it fell off the Tracking.

Called Azon and was told if not there by X days of week call them back.

Got busy so did not call but watched Tracking. It was scanned on the 7th.

Finally yesterday it was rescanned at some location and it showed up this morning.

Bro owns Electrition biz-he is having same [roblem getting parts. Not there, ordered, no show, cancel order and order elsewhere and no show.
 

Walrus

Veteran Member
I don't think anyone grows coffee in the Deep South, but during the Civil War, southern troops used roasted and ground chicory as a coffee substitute. To this day, regional blends of coffee and chicory are still sold. I'm happy to drink the blends, though I've never tried pure chicory.
Me neither. I've read it's pretty bitter but I guess it passed good as coffee during the war. We've got lots of chicory in the pastures and I know the rabbits love it when I move their rabbit tractor over a bunch of it. They especially like the flowers. It's sure got a tough stem when growing in the lawn! I guess I should grab a bite of it myself one of these days to check the taste.

I've drank a whole bunch of Community but not familiar with other blends; they've pretty well got to have chicory in them to sell, I guess.

I've got a bunch of vacuum-packed green coffee beans but it's kind of a science experiment; I don't know if that'll age better than roasted beans or not.
 
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Walrus

Veteran Member
The US has a long row to hoe to get back to food self sufficiency. Anyone who thinks the US government has big storehouses of food for the people like it did back after WWII? Forget it. Earl butz ended that program decades ago. In famine the government is not coming to our rescue.
Earl Butz. Now there's a name from the past. I think he was the first bureaucrat ever fired for telling a politically incorrect joke. Of course, he told it when he was sitting on a plane near Pat Boone and John Dean the snitch, was the story I remember.

I do remember as a kid getting government surplus food, although I don't really know how it was distributed. I don't remember what all of it was but I liked the peanut butter and goveemint cheese (not velveeta but big blocks of longhorn cheddar). What was the name of that food program - commodities or something like that?
 

tiredude

Veteran Member
With people refusing to work, busienesses closed or closing

Transport and shipping breaking down and needed parts becoming hard to either find or get

How are they going to get that to market perzaxtky?

Here is an example from my side. I was looking for a specific post hole digger. The one I wanted was on Delay at Amazon but the local Ace could order it and get it to me in a week. After week I get a call it was not in and it should be in the following week.

Following week...Crickets. Go by Ace and they look it up, telling me they were having all sorts of issues with the Ace Waehouse.

Nada. Showss it was ordered then nothing.

Got money back and went on Azon and ordered a slightly different version.

Was supposed to arrive the 4th. Come the 4th and got mssg shipment was late.

Followed Tracking-it was stuck in Customs for two days [[coming from Great Britain]] then to Cincinatti where it fell off the Tracking.

Called Azon and was told if not there by X days of week call them back.

Got busy so did not call but watched Tracking. It was scanned on the 7th.

Finally yesterday it was rescanned at some location and it showed up this morning.

Bro owns Electrition biz-he is having same [roblem getting parts. Not there, ordered, no show, cancel order and order elsewhere and no show.
are you sure you are not chucks lil brother?
 

nomifyle

Has No Life - Lives on TB
I don't think anyone grows coffee in the Deep South, but during the Civil War, southern troops used roasted and ground chicory as a coffee substitute. To this day, regional blends of coffee and chicory are still sold. I'm happy to drink the blends, though I've never tried pure chicory.

Best
Doc
Having lived in New Orleans, I buy Community Coffee & Chicory. Love the stuff. There is only one restaurant in my area (Natchitoches) that has a decent cup of coffee. The owners are creole and also home of the fried meat pie.

God is good all the time

Judy
 
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