Equipment Husqvarna Viking 190

kyrsyan

Veteran Member
This is my sewing machine. For the first time ever, since I got it, it's acting up. As in no power. The wheel turns, the needle turns, nothing appears to be locked in place. The cord appears good. But no power. Checked the outlet, cleaned the plug prongs, blew out any and all dust. Nada. A friend is going to test the cord tomorrow or Tues to make sure power is capable of going through it.

If the cord is bad - the problem is that replacement cords are not available and there is no way of knowing if they will ever be available again. The cord ends are molded and not openable so I have no clue how to run a replacement cord.

Anything else I can check before I need to look at turning it over to a repair shop? My biggest concern with a repair shop is whether they can do the work on a machine this old. Because I'm not giving up the machine. They don't make them like this anymore. I can work on almost any material on this machine.
 

packyderms_wife

Neither here nor there.
This is my sewing machine. For the first time ever, since I got it, it's acting up. As in no power. The wheel turns, the needle turns, nothing appears to be locked in place. The cord appears good. But no power. Checked the outlet, cleaned the plug prongs, blew out any and all dust. Nada. A friend is going to test the cord tomorrow or Tues to make sure power is capable of going through it.

If the cord is bad - the problem is that replacement cords are not available and there is no way of knowing if they will ever be available again. The cord ends are molded and not openable so I have no clue how to run a replacement cord.

Anything else I can check before I need to look at turning it over to a repair shop? My biggest concern with a repair shop is whether they can do the work on a machine this old. Because I'm not giving up the machine. They don't make them like this anymore. I can work on almost any material on this machine.
Any good sewing machine shop should be able to get you a replacement cord. Call Metro Sewing and Vacuum in Des Moines, IA if you do not have a decent shop near by. They can get just about anything, and I mean they can get just about anything!

(515) 265-7504
 

kyrsyan

Veteran Member
The problem is good sewing machine shop. The only one even vaguely close to me is a Singer shop. And when I last asked there, they worked Singer machines only. And not Singer machines as old as the one I own, a 915. (Yeah, I'm really fond of older, extremely well built sewing machines. I tend to break modern machines.) A friend has given me a lead on someone that works from home on machines dropped at a quilt store just over the state line from me. And that is where the baby will go if it's not the cord.
I'm only troubleshooting the cord, maybe the inside connections to the cord but I was really surprised to discover a small motherboard right at that connection point. If it's past the cord, it is well out of my wheelhouse for electrical. I can make that machine sing in many different ways but electrical problems are not my area. I will go digging through the forum though and see what might pop.
 

Millwright

Knuckle Dragger
_______________
Here's some parts, the cords are 'spensive. 70-80bux.

Checking inside the machine would be a must-do.

 

Grouchy Granny

Deceased
My Bernina 440 did that..... the bad news was it was the motherboard.

The shop that worked on it called me to see who worked on it last because some things weren't done right - it was them! I am currently trying to find another Bernina dealer who is not 2 hours drive, but if I have to I'll go to Fort Collins to someone reputable and who has been vouched for by a shop in another state.
 

kyrsyan

Veteran Member
Here's some parts, the cords are 'spensive. 70-80bux.

Checking inside the machine would be a must-do.

Yeah. That's why we're going to check the cord and see if that's the problem. Any other parts, I'd probably have to buy a used one as a parts machine, which would be a shame. They are good solid machines for the most part. But the sewing machine portion of the company, at least, was sold in 2006. I have no idea if the new owners are willing or able to provide parts for a machine made at least 25 years before they bought the line.
 

kyrsyan

Veteran Member
My Bernina 440 did that..... the bad news was it was the motherboard.

The shop that worked on it called me to see who worked on it last because some things weren't done right - it was them! I am currently trying to find another Bernina dealer who is not 2 hours drive, but if I have to I'll go to Fort Collins to someone reputable and who has been vouched for by a shop in another state.
It's getting harder and harder to find good repair folks, especially for older machines. Heck, I had a problem finding someone local to sharpen my sewing shears and that cost a pretty chunk of money. Seems a lot of old skills are fading.
 

Millwright

Knuckle Dragger
_______________
My mom has a Bernina, probably a 90s model, did stuff from computer graphics, etc.

The computer interface is obsolete now, but she still does quilting with it....and 7 other machines that are set up for this n that. :lol:
 

Grouchy Granny

Deceased
It's getting harder and harder to find good repair folks, especially for older machines. Heck, I had a problem finding someone local to sharpen my sewing shears and that cost a pretty chunk of money. Seems a lot of old skills are fading.
I think it's more of a case of finding some one who takes pride in their work and does quality work. I intensely dislike the people at the local Bernina dealer; they're condescending, rude, and just generally only want to take your money instead of giving you any help.
 

packyderms_wife

Neither here nor there.
The problem is good sewing machine shop. The only one even vaguely close to me is a Singer shop. And when I last asked there, they worked Singer machines only. And not Singer machines as old as the one I own, a 915. (Yeah, I'm really fond of older, extremely well built sewing machines. I tend to break modern machines.) A friend has given me a lead on someone that works from home on machines dropped at a quilt store just over the state line from me. And that is where the baby will go if it's not the cord.
I'm only troubleshooting the cord, maybe the inside connections to the cord but I was really surprised to discover a small motherboard right at that connection point. If it's past the cord, it is well out of my wheelhouse for electrical. I can make that machine sing in many different ways but electrical problems are not my area. I will go digging through the forum though and see what might pop.
the place in DM has parts for older machines. I used to belong to the quilt guild there, over 2K members, and many of them had machines for the 50's and 60's, this was especially true for the Bernina owners. That shop tends to the machines for that guild.
 

packyderms_wife

Neither here nor there.
Here's some parts, the cords are 'spensive. 70-80bux.

Checking inside the machine would be a must-do.

Lol, that's cheap compared to the replacement cord for my Janomes.
 

oleglass

Contributing Member
I have used his company for parts on a 1929 Singer treadle machine I reworked for DW.
Emailed them the questions and they replied promptly, gave part numbers I needed
Ordered and shipped promptly.
 

kyrsyan

Veteran Member
Thank you, Helen. Those are saved. If it's the cord, I'll eat the cost and buy it. I don't like most modern sewing machines and they don't like me. I might get away with a modern industrial machine and not break it but not what is available for residential. I really wish I had been the one to inherit my grandmother's machine.
 

kyrsyan

Veteran Member
I heard back from the sewing machine repair group. Hopefully it is good news. If the cord is good, the next most common problem for these machines is a loose wire for the plug, just inside the machine. A spot we can actually get to and test. Barely.
These machines are bearingless machines so it is very difficult to get inside past the 3" x 4" plate on the bottom. Keeping fingers crossed that we find, and can fix or get fixed, the problem. Because if that's not the problem, it pretty much has to go to the repair shop. And a repair person that is familiar with these machines.
 

packyderms_wife

Neither here nor there.
Thank you, Helen. Those are saved. If it's the cord, I'll eat the cost and buy it. I don't like most modern sewing machines and they don't like me. I might get away with a modern industrial machine and not break it but not what is available for residential. I really wish I had been the one to inherit my grandmother's machine.
That's why I own a Janome 6500, in addition to two other Janomes and five Singers. I'm hard on machines, that said I've had my 6500 18 years now, have had it in for servicing about every five years.
 

kyrsyan

Veteran Member
That's why I own a Janome 6500, in addition to two other Janomes and five Singers. I'm hard on machines, that said I've had my 6500 18 years now, have had it in for servicing about every five years.
When I was married my ex quickly decided that buying brand new machines was not a good idea for me. Three machines in a row died and died quickly. I have my Viking, my Singer 915, and a Singer Touch and Sew. If I have to I'll sell the Touch and Sew to get the money to buy another machine. Actually, I'll probably do that anyways. My mom used to have that machine and it and I did not get along. This one was a gift from a friend.
The old machines were built to last. Nowadays, not so much. At least, not before you get into the way high dollar range. I could probably get a used industrial machine for less. My eyes just about bugged out when I saw how much non functional Viking 190s were going for on ebay.
 

packyderms_wife

Neither here nor there.
When I was married my ex quickly decided that buying brand new machines was not a good idea for me. Three machines in a row died and died quickly. I have my Viking, my Singer 915, and a Singer Touch and Sew. If I have to I'll sell the Touch and Sew to get the money to buy another machine. Actually, I'll probably do that anyways. My mom used to have that machine and it and I did not get along. This one was a gift from a friend.
The old machines were built to last. Nowadays, not so much. At least, not before you get into the way high dollar range. I could probably get a used industrial machine for less. My eyes just about bugged out when I saw how much non functional Viking 190s were going for on ebay.
the 6500 is a tank, hence the reason I bought it. I've actually sewn copper sheet metal with that beast.
 

AlaskaSue

North to the Future
I bought a Singer Touch and Sew in 1975. It still works wonderfully - even after I let the high school Home Ec use it for a few years. My work horse is the Janome 660 Pro that my sweet boys bought for me. Lovely for quilting and I've done some really heavy-duty repairs too - even on carharts. Yow.

Just got a Janome hand-crank last year. A lot of folks here have treadle or hand-cranks for their cabins and boats. If it all goes down at least I'll have options. And yes, I do have the requisite fabric and thread stash....(er, wait, I mean I lost it all in that unfortunate boating accident...).

Your post reminds me though - I do need to get the electric one in for a tune up. Do let us know how it goes...if my little repair shop can handle my old Singer I hope yours does you right :)
 

kyrsyan

Veteran Member
Update. It's not the cord/foot pedal. It's also not the plug connection. That leaves the small computer board just inside the machine. A 1980 computer board. The fuse appears fine. So does the power control (if we are looking at the right thing.) But short of completely disconnecting and sending off to the family expert, we are stuck. (And send it to Dad means figuring out how to disconnect the ribbon cable.)
Phone calls going to be made to see if the one local mechanic recommended can work on this machine. But not a lot of hope at the moment.
 

Attachments

kyrsyan

Veteran Member
It is a 1979/80 board. The pic above is all it is. And since I'm not giving up unless someone tells me it's the motor or another $300 to $400 part, I'm keeping fingers crossed.
 

summerthyme

Administrator
_______________
This problem is why I decided to keep my Mom's Pfaff 130 machine. One- NO COMPUTER! My Bernina 930 is my workhorse...made in 1980, it was one of (or maybe THE) first computerized machines. And it has sewn miles of seams (wedding dresses, prom dresses, dozens of quilts, cow blankets, vinyl covers for outdoor chicken feeders... turkey coats! Its done everything.)

But a few years ago, in the middle of sewing the long sashing strips onto a log cabin quilt (so, it had sewn many, many feet of seam... I think I'd gone through 16 bobbins!) and it suddenly stopped dead. Totally seized up. With no warning at all!

I wasn't happy! I took it apart... it wasn't the motor; the drive shaft simply refused to turn. And it looked like it had shifted a tiny bit (a shiny worn spot on the shaft). I decided to leave it for my engineer/machinist son. But before I closed it back up I bathed the whole shaft in 3 in 1 oil, concentrating on the areas it appeared should move.

A month later, DS came by. I explained the problem, turned the machine on... and it ran perfectly! He even took it apart to see if there was anything that was damaged or needed replacing... nope. <shrug>. I now oil those areas every 6 months (or after assembling a quilt), even though the manuals don't say to.

But the old Pfaff (it was the first machine that did decorative embroidery stitches, but it's all mechanical... it uses a cam system) will be kept, despite lack of space, so I'm not stuck without a usable machine.

Summerthyme
 

kyrsyan

Veteran Member
Yeah. The board in the picture is the only one. It is the same age as the Bernina. There are reports of problems when the grease in the sealed units gets too cold. Not a problem I've had before but it was super cold recently and the machine was on the floor in it's case. So for now, I'm going to put it back together and lay it on its side in a warmer place. I'll test it again in a few months.
And there is a reason I keep the old Singer. All mechanical. It will always have a home here.
Right now, I'm doing the project by hand because the bp is too high and fighting with the serger over stretch thread is something I am just not up to. First round of stitching (edge) is done. A 10" tube elastic segment has been added to the drawcord. Next is running the cord back through because this elastic has a tube for the drawcord. Then flipping and stitching three rows of straight stitch, which I can do in my sleep. And then we'll see my son's response to his repaired/altered favorite pair of shorts.
And I might be being a hair lazy. I didn't want to run gathering stitch. So I pinned it in quarters, and then half that, and then half one more time. And I'm gently stretching as I stitch so that the elastic will do the gather for me. Oh, and hand stitching with Maxi Lock Stretch is an adventure in not snagging.
 
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