Help How to store potatoes from the garden in humid weather?

frazbo

Veteran Member
I just know someone out there knows how I can store my potatoes from the garden in the Ozarks...humid...I live on a limestone plate so no root cellar can be done here...well, if I had dynamite I could but THAT'S not gonna get by dh, so any suggestions? I had a bumper crop and still not done pulling the rest of the gardens, did not expect this much and I so want to be able to save some on in to the winter and maybe spring.

I've never had this problem before as I never had this many potato plants produce so much, so now I'm stuck and don't know how to preserve them for long term storage. Any ideas?
 

summerthyme

Administrator
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Barring being able to dig down at least 3-4 feet (and bury some sort of rodent proof container), your only real choice is to use an old refrigerator or freezer, and jury rig the thermostat (for the freezer) to hold around 45 degrees.

For now, leaving them in the ground IF you don't have rodent problems will.work... you can mulch them heavily to prevent them from freezing and dig as needed into the winter.

Good luck!

Summerthyme
 

frazbo

Veteran Member
Barring being able to dig down at least 3-4 feet (and bury some sort of rodent proof container), your only real choice is to use an old refrigerator or freezer, and jury rig the thermostat (for the freezer) to hold around 45 degrees.

For now, leaving them in the ground IF you don't have rodent problems will.work... you can mulch them heavily to prevent them from freezing and dig as needed into the winter.

Good luck!

Summerthyme
Wow...thanks...All my gardens are raised beds as there is no "digging" in this part of the state and that just might work since they won't be "in" the ground to freeze, mulching heavily just might save some of it. Didn't think of that from that aspect. Makes sense. Hot diggity dawg, we're not gonna starve this winter after all...lol
Thanks again.
 

mecoastie

Veteran Member
Barring being able to dig down at least 3-4 feet (and bury some sort of rodent proof container), your only real choice is to use an old refrigerator or freezer, and jury rig the thermostat (for the freezer) to hold around 45 degrees.

For now, leaving them in the ground IF you don't have rodent problems will.work... you can mulch them heavily to prevent them from freezing and dig as needed into the winter.

Good luck!

Summerthyme
This is what my father does. Heavily mulches the carrots, beets and potatoes right in the garden. It buys him at least another month until they get put in the root cellar.
 
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