INTL Davos 2018

Housecarl

On TB every waking moment
For links see article source.....
Posted for fair use.....
http://www.dpa-international.com/topic/merkel-macron-call-powerful-eu-davos-braces-trump-180124-99-785983

Merkel, Macron call for more powerful EU as Davos braces for Trump

Albert Otti
Jan 24, 2018

Davos, Switzerland (dpa) - The European Union must become a stronger international player, the leaders of Germany and France said at the World Economic Forum on Wednesday, reflecting on the policies of US President Donald Trump ahead of his arrival at the annual summit.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel called on the bloc to adopt a more coherent foreign policy.

EU diplomacy will fail unless the bloc starts sending unified messages to countries like the United States, China, India and Russia, she warned.

"We need to take more responsibility, we need to take our destiny into our own hands," Merkel said at the annual gathering of political and business leaders in the Swiss town of Davos.

French President Emmanuel Macron proposed an even more ambitious vision for Europe when he outlined a 10-year strategy to turn the EU into a major power.

The plan would build a Europe that champions universal freedom, fairness and justice, offering an alternative to the way that the US and China are governed.

"If we want to avoid this fragmentation of the world, we need a stronger Europe," he said.

Different EU members might adopt this plan to tackle digital technology, migration, energy and investments at different speeds, Macron proposed.

In his speech, the young French leader also promoted his country as an attractive destination for foreign investors, and he announced a 10-billion-euro (12-billion-dollar) French innovation fund.

Merkel and Macron renounced efforts to unravel free-trade rules, in an indirect rebuke to Trump's isolationist trade policies.

"Protectionism is not the answer," Merkel said.

Washington this week decided to impose punitive tariffs on washing machines and solar power equipment, arguing that the US was merely reacting to unfair trade policies in other countries.

Countries complaining about unfair trade relations should seek multilateral rather than unilateral solutions, Merkel noted.

While Merkel and Macron called for a more dominant EU, frictions among the bloc's countries were on display in Davos as the leaders of Italy and Greece lashed out at Central and Eastern European countries over their lack of solidarity on the migration crisis.

These countries may suffer for it in upcoming EU budget negotiations, Italian Prime Minister Paolo Gentiloni and Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras warned.

Merkel warned that the EU should not close itself off to migration.

"Ever since the Roman Empire, ever since the Great Wall of China, we know that only shutting yourself off doesn't help," the chancellor said, advocating international cooperation, adherence to global treaties and development.

"We as Europeans have a great debt from colonial times to fulfil to Africa," she said, proposing stronger economic cooperation with African countries.

Merkel also called for efforts to fight rising far-right populism. Such movements are "poison" for societies, she said.

In Europe, the unsolved migration crisis has been one of the reasons why populists are gaining support, she acknowledged.

Numerous country leaders attending the Davos meeting have expressed their support for a world order that is based on cooperation rather than narrow national interests.

Trump is set to arrive in Davos on Thursday, and to hold a speech on his "America First" policy on Friday.
 

Housecarl

On TB every waking moment
For links see article source.....
Posted for fair use.....
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-davos-meeting-europe/on-eve-of-trump-trip-eu-leaders-warn-against-nationalism-idUSKBN1FD28T

#FULL COVERAGE FROM DAVOS JANUARY 24, 2018 / 7:42 AM / UPDATED 3 HOURS AGO

On eve of Trump trip, EU leaders warn against nationalism

Noah Barkin, Yara Bayoumy
4 MIN READ

DAVOS, Switzerland (Reuters) - European leaders warned at the World Economic Forum in Davos on Wednesday against a return to nationalism, with France’s Emmanuel Macron and Germany’s Angela Merkel calling for more global cooperation to harness the forces of globalization.

Video (Run time 11:42)

The speeches by Merkel, Macron and Italy’s Paolo Gentiloni -- leaders of the continent’s three biggest economies -- came one day before U.S. President Donald Trump arrives at the annual summit in the Swiss Alps to promote his America First policies.

Since taking power one year ago, Trump has pulled the United States out of international agreements on trade and climate, and threatened to torpedo a deal to curb Iran’s nuclear program, unsettling partners who have looked to Washington to help shape global rules since World War Two.

Macron spoke for a full hour, receiving a standing ovation from the crowd of CEOs, bankers and top academics, after he called for a “global compact” to address the economic forces that have led to rising inequality and a surge in populism.

“We have a situation where people are being told, on social and financial issues, that the answer is to do less, to cut our taxes, there is no limit, it’s a race to the bottom,” Macron said, weeks after Trump pushed through a large cut in corporate taxes that is expected to lure investment to the United States.

“If we aren’t able to agree a standard of international cooperation, we will never convince the middle class, the working class that globalization is good for them.”

LESSONS OF HISTORY
Merkel, in her return to the world stage after months of political limbo in Germany, evoked the two world wars and questioned whether the West had learned the lessons from those conflicts.

“We are seeing nationalism, populism and in a lot of countries a polarized atmosphere,” Merkel told the packed auditorium where Trump will speak on Friday.

“We believe that isolation won’t help us. We believe we need to cooperate, that protectionism is not the answer,” she said, asking: “Have we really learned from history, or haven’t we?”

Pressed on what his message to Trump would be, Italian Prime Minister Paolo Gentiloni said it was legitimate to defend one’s own citizens, companies and economic, but “there is a limit”.

After suffering a series of crises over the past decade -- from euro turmoil, to Ukraine, refugees and Brexit -- Europe is feeling confident again.

Its economy has rebounded and the election of pro-European centrist Macron in France has injected new momentum into efforts to reform the European Union.

“Europe has been a phenomenal story this year,” Harvard economist Kenneth Rogoff told the forum this week.

Macron, switching between English and French, took several tongue-in-cheek swipes at Trump, with whom he’s formed an odd bond since the two engaged in a bone-crushing macho handshake in their first meeting back in May.

At the outset of his speech, the 40-year-old French president joked about heavy snowfall in Davos, saying it might lead some people to question whether global warming was really a problem.

“Fortunately you didn’t invite anybody skeptical of global warming this year,” Macron, glancing over at WEF founder Klaus Schwab, said to laughs.

Merkel, weakened by an inconclusive German election in September, appeared days after the Social Democrats (SPD) agreed to enter coalition talks with her conservatives.

“Europe must take its fate into its own hands,” she said, echoing a message she sent after a contentious Group of Seven summit with Trump back in May.

Editing by Mark Bendeich
 

Housecarl

On TB every waking moment
Hummm....

For links see article source.....
Posted for fair use.....
http://www.latimes.com/politics/la-na-pol-trump-davos-20180124-story.html

President Trump campaigned against global elites. Now he is joining them in Davos

By NOAH BIERMAN
JAN 24, 2018 | 2:15 PM | WASHINGTON

You can tell someone's status at the splashy World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, by the color of the badge around his or her neck. White goes to the top caste, the billionaires who run the world, or think they do.

President Trump, the mogul who got elected by railing against global elites in favor of the "forgotten man and the forgotten woman," on Thursday will fly into the Alpine ski resort where the elites gather annually for a two-day stay certain to be closely watched by both groups.

He'll host some white-badged European captains of industry at a fine dinner, meet with several heads of state from Britain and Africa who have been angered by his rhetoric, and deliver a major address that many at Davos hope will answer the question: How does his "America First" doctrine fit into this year's theme — "Creating a Shared Future in a Fractured World"?

Dozens of world leaders routinely attend. Last year, China's President Xi Jinping was the star attraction, with a purposely un-Trumpian tribute to globalism. Trump will be the first sitting American president to visit the conference since a lame duck Bill Clinton did so in 2000, in large part because predecessors of both parties have seen it as politically perilous to rub elbows in such rarefied company.

That has many diplomats, financiers and others around the world wondering how the self-styled populist will use the occasion — whether Trump will soft-sell his populist rhetoric, as some administration officials are urging, or strike a confrontational tone favored by his more nationalist advisors, a diminished group since the firing last year of Stephen K. Bannon, formerly Trump's chief strategist.

It was one of the globalists in Trump's inner circle, economic advisor Gary Cohn, who previewed the president's message for reporters on Tuesday. "America First is not America alone," he said. "When we grow, the world grows. When the world grows, we grow."

He dismissed the notion that Trump's appearance comes in reaction to ​​​​​​Xi's address at the conference last year, which many saw as China's bid to take on the United States' global leadership role as Trump seemed to retreat from it.

Cohn said that Trump would be traveling as a salesman "to tell the world that America is open for business." Despite new tariffs, threats to leave the North American Free Trade Agreement and the president's decisions to withdraw from both the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement and the Paris climate accord, Cohn insisted that, "The U.S. is pulling back from nothing," and remained committed to trade.

Yet Trump's speech on Friday will come on the heels of signs that he is getting more aggressive on trade, imposing new tariffs on solar panels and washing machines this week while sending sharply worded reports to Congress criticizing Chinese and Russian trade practices.

Support for both free trade and the need to combat global warming is virtual dogma at the conference. Trump has called climate change a Chinese hoax, and turned his back on the Paris accord as well as multinational trade agreements with European and Pacific Rim nations.

The perils of globalism that Trump made so vivid on the campaign trail — factory closings, outsourced jobs — are generally seen at Davos as the tradeoffs for greater prosperity overall in the United States and the rest of the world.

"It's not that the Davos elite never raise the downsides of globalization," said Jared Bernstein, a former economic advisor in the Obama administration. "It's just that whenever they do, the solution is more globalization."

"I think he's going to go and say 'Wake up and smell the coffee. This is what the world is really like and we are not going to stand by and get screwed,'" said Claire Reade, an assistant U.S. trade representative in the Obama administration.

The world has certainly seen this version of Trump, most recently at an international conference in Vietnam in November. There he declared, "We are not going to let the United States be taken advantage of anymore," as he railed against "product dumping, subsidized goods, currency manipulation and predatory industrial policies." Still, as president, Trump just as frequently has held such rhetoric in check, as he did on the same trip in a conciliatory meeting with Xi in Beijing.

Even if Trump the nationalist resists much of the Davos ethos, another part of him could find the forum appealing — the salesman eager to personally woo business leaders in a way that few presidents have done in the past. And certainly the setting also gels with his long-honed brand as a man who likes luxury and fame.

A longtime confidant who asked for anonymity to maintain his access to the president, said Davos would test Trump's "twin compulsions" — a sense of grievance toward the elites and a desire to be accepted by them. Trump is now the most famous resident of Palm Beach, Fla., another enclave of extreme privilege, but he largely crashed his way in, flouting the island's discreet traditions as he fought for years with the town council to turn Mar-a-Lago from a cereal heiress' estate into a showy membership club.

"On the one hand, he hates them because he's an outsider and the fancy people would never accept him. They view him as nouveau riche," said the confidant. "But he wants to be accepted by them. He wants them to think he's doing a good job."

Many in Davos are eager for the networking opportunities with a U.S. president. Trump's unusually large delegation is dominated by his more globalist aides, led by Treasury Secretary Steven T. Mnuchin, a former Goldman Sachs executive and hedge fund manager, and including Cohn, who was previously Goldman Sachs's president, and Jared Kushner, his son-in-law.

Trump's wife, Melania, who has not been seen publicly since the Wall Street Journal reported earlier this month that the president's lawyer paid an adult film actress to cover up an affair, will not be accompanying him.

Mnuchin insisted during a briefing with reporters this month that Davos is not "a hangout for globalists. That drew chuckles of disbelief from his audience and suggested some defensiveness on the administration's part.

Another administration official, who requested anonymity to discuss strategy, said Trump will not shrink from his anti-globalist stance. But, the official added, "There's not an effort to make this a confrontation."

Trump, of course, is famous for going off script or ignoring advice from his aides, as he did when he addressed the United Nations in September and referred to North Korean leader Kim Jong Un as "Rocket Man" on a "suicide mission."

Regardless of how he is perceived, Trump will have access to all the top parties and meetings he could ever want. And he doesn't even need a badge.

noah.bierman@latimes.com

Twitter: @noahbierman
 

Housecarl

On TB every waking moment
For links see article source.....
Posted for fair use.....
http://thehill.com/opinion/finance/370480-the-rich-and-powerful-wont-let-trump-ruin-their-davos-party

The rich and powerful won't let Trump ruin their Davos party

BY DOUGLAS A. REDIKER, OPINION CONTRIBUTOR — 01/24/18 01:15 PM EST
165 Comments
THE VIEWS EXPRESSED BY CONTRIBUTORS ARE THEIR OWN AND NOT THE VIEW OF THE HILL

President Donald Trump’s visit to Davos this week adds to the unpredictable narrative of his presidency.

Trump’s governing philosophy is captured in the phrase “America First”, providing a stark contrast to that of the World Economic Forum (WEF), which operates under the slogan, “committed to improving the state of the world."

But, for all the dissonance of Trump’s speaking at a forum he has previously demonized, the most likely scenario is that the speech goes off without much controversy and, even more likely, without disrupting the flow of the world’s greatest party.

The WEF Annual Meeting in Davos is known as the world’s most exclusive gathering, attended by heads of state, financiers, bankers, CEO’s, policy experts and journalists.

Anyone and everyone who is there is “somebody”. It is networking nirvana. And there are parties all day and all night, on and off site, large and small, hosted by countries, companies and banks.

In the main halls, there are speeches by political leaders. It has been 18 years since the last sitting U.S. president came to Davos. Then, it was Bill Clinton, who personified the Davos globalization agenda.

Last year, Chinese President Xi Jin Ping attended and gave the speech that everyone was talking about. It was the first time a Chinese leader had ever attended Davos.

Xi used the opportunity to try to provide reassurance to those in attendance that, in spite of the uncertainties around the election of Donald Trump, whose agenda seemed to explicitly advocate the disruption of that very world order, China was ready to provide ballast to the multilateral, pluralistic ,liberal, free-market world order.

The irony of the leader of one-party, communist China, whose economic model is based on state intervention in the economy and where freedom of the press and human rights are strictly controlled, providing succor to the attendees was not lost on the audience.

But the fears of Trump’s presidency were so great that Chinese expressions of support for the status quo were widely welcomed.

This year, it will be Donald Trump who takes center stage. There are optimistic expectations that President Trump will seek to challenge last year’s implicit invitation by Xi for the global elite to embrace China’s worldview and that he will make the case for continued U.S. primacy in anchoring and leading the world order.

There are also pessimistic expectations that Trump will use the pulpit to reinforce his "America First" narrative and thumb his nose at the attendees and the elitism that they represent and that his political base rejects.

I expect Trump will use the opportunity to both make the case for U.S. leadership and to criticize and challenge what he sees as unfairness and hypocrisy of the status quo. He is likely to argue that a resurgent, growing U.S. economy is not only good for the U.S., but that U.S. growth spurs global growth, which is good for everyone.

Unlike his domestic rhetoric, which is largely based on the zero-sum, binary principle of winners and losers, Trump may well acknowledge that not only does the rest of the world benefit from a strong U.S., but that the U.S. also benefits from an economically strong rest of the world.

Video

Just by acknowledging that the fortunes of the U.S. and the rest of the world are interlinked, it will be seen as a triumph of the spirit of Davos.

I also expect Trump to acknowledge that there are some benefits to the existing multilateral system of trade, governance and diplomacy, which would be seen as a big step for the public posture of the president.

However, he will likely argue that these systems and institutions only work if those participating in them play by the rules, and that many countries have not done so. In particular, I expect Trump to call out China, either by name or through thinly veiled rhetoric.

I anticipate Trump makes the case that last year’s speech by President Xi was based on the fiction that China can replace the U.S. as the keeper of a multilateral system, when it has been China itself that has been the most glaring “bad actor” in breaking the rules of that system, in particular in the area of trade.

He may also use the forum to raise hostile threats against North Korea, take digs at Mexico and Canada for failing to capitulate to U.S. demands in NAFTA negotiations or threaten further action against Iran; or not.

Donald Trump at Davos is such an inherently odd pairing that it is impossible to really predict what he will do once he is on the stage, speaking to the very crowd that has generally shunned him and that some would argue he has always aspired to join.

Beyond the headline speech, President Trump is not likely to engage in the sideline networking that is really at the heart of Davos. The “schmoozing” that he used to love in his pre-political days in New York City would be ideal for Davos, but it seems unlikely that he will wade into the Davos social scene.

Nor do I expect him to make any political breakthroughs on the sidelines in meetings with other world leaders or business titans. The U.S. delegation is heavy on trade officials, but I do not expect any breakthroughs there either. If anything, the week’s interactions may provide a sense of the limits of U.S. unilateralism.

Attendees at this year’s Davos event will likely pay attention to Donald Trump, but the event will not be all about Donald Trump. Business and political deals will get done, crucial contacts will be made, cutting edge technologies will be showcased, experts will opine on fascinating topics, and parties will continue through the snowy nights in the Swiss Alps. But, I expect Donald Trump and his team to be largely absent from the bulk of the action.

It will be hard to reconcile the appearance of this president, even on best behavior, with the man who ran against Hillary Clinton and the Democrats, who he and his advisors disparagingly called the “party of Davos”.

Klaus Schwab, the founder of the WEF, has already sought to calm concerns about Trump’s appearance by calling for critics to keep an open mind and try to use Trump’s Davos appearance as a way to provide the president with a global perspective.

He may be right. Donald Trump’s attendance could somehow inform him of the perspectives of the rest of the world. But, I doubt it. The gap between "America First” and “committed to improving the state of the world” is very wide.

Attendees, many of whom paid enormous sums to be in Davos, are not likely to let Donald Trump derail their party. The most likely outcome may be that Trump attends, makes the case for his agenda, and the Davos elites neither embrace nor reject the outreach, but largely ignore the effort and go on with their Davos activities regardless.

There is nothing Donald Trump will hate more than to be seen as irrelevant.

Douglas A. Rediker is a nonresident senior fellow in the Global Economy and Development Program at The Brookings Institution. He is also the founding partner of International Capital Strategies, LLC, a Washington, DC-based political economy consultancy.
 

Be Well

may all be well
Trump's wife, Melania, who has not been seen publicly since the Wall Street Journal reported earlier this month that the president's lawyer paid an adult film actress to cover up an affair, will not be accompanying him.

Mnuchin insisted during a briefing with reporters this month that Davos is not "a hangout for globalists. That drew chuckles of disbelief from his audience and suggested some defensiveness on the administration's part.

Another administration official, who requested anonymity to discuss strategy, said Trump will not shrink from his anti-globalist stance. But, the official added, "There's not an effort to make this a confrontation."

Trump, of course, is famous for going off script or ignoring advice from his aides, as he did when he addressed the United Nations in September and referred to North Korean leader Kim Jong Un as "Rocket Man" on a "suicide mission."

Regardless of how he is perceived, Trump will have access to all the top parties and meetings he could ever want. And he doesn't even need a badge.
What a totally insane article.

That's all I can say....besides :kk1:


The rich and powerful won't let Trump ruin their Davos party

BY DOUGLAS A. REDIKER, OPINION CONTRIBUTOR — 01/24/18 01:15 PM EST
WIshful thinking, aholes!
 

Housecarl

On TB every waking moment
What a totally insane article.

That's all I can say....besides :kk1:




WIshful thinking, aholes!
Yeah, I posted that one in particular because of the level of "troll" it oozed....

My "little voice" is wondering if we're going to see a repeat of Xi's dinner with Trump in Florida on a much bigger scale?...
 

Be Well

may all be well
Yeah, I posted that one in particular because of the level of "troll" it oozed....

My "little voice" is wondering if we're going to see a repeat of Xi's dinner with Trump in Florida on a much bigger scale?...
I figured you were posted them in the interests of what "they" are saying....to me their nastiness has an undercurrent of fear; whistling past the graveyard faux journalism. They don't realize the extent of who Trump is - his goals, his methods, his use of Sun Tzu and no doubt other master tacticians and strategists. Nor the fact that he gave up everything that was important to him in life to take the job of POTUS.
 

Housecarl

On TB every waking moment
Well if they want to play juvenile games.....Particularly considering Durbin's version of the meeting has been refuted by everyone else there....

For links see article source.....
Posted for fair use.....
https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/davos-attendees-are-quietly-planning-to-walk-out-of-trump’s-speech/ar-AAv8DH1?ocid=spartanntp

Davos attendees are quietly planning to walk out of Trump’s speech

Quartz
Heather Timmons
5 hrs ago

A growing number of Davos attendees are planning to walk out of US president Donald Trump’s speech at the World Economic Forum this Friday (Jan. 26), several conference-goers told Quartz, to protest his remarks about African countries earlier this month.

Trump repeatedly called African countries “shitholes” in a closed-door meeting about immigration, attendee Senator Dick Durbin and others have said.

Boycotting Trump’s Davos speech was first broached by Business Leadership South Africa CEO (and Davos attendee) Bonang Mohale in an open letter. Leaving Trump’s speech after he starts is probably more powerful than boycotting it entirely, some Davos attendees speculate.

At this year’s graduation ceremony at the University of Notre Dame, dozens of students and their families silently stood up and walked out as vice president Mike Pence spoke about freedom of speech.

African CEOs said they’d like Trump to acknowledge that he said something inappropriate, and say he’s sorry. “We’re only looking for that, just to apologize” said Luvuyo Rani, the CEO of Silulo Ulutho Technologies, a South African internet company. There’s no way Trump realizes the “damage” he’s caused, said Rani, who added he wasn’t sure whether he’d attend the speech or not.

Trump is scheduled to meet with Rwandan president Kagame, who is also chairman of the African Union, to “reaffirm the U.S.-Africa relationship and discuss shared priorities,” on Friday, the White House said. He speech is scheduled for the early afternoon.

Trump’s remarks aren’t likely to do much damage to long-term trade and investment between the US and African nations, Rani said. South Africa has deep connections with America, he said, including a history of sending students to colleges there and a close trade relationship. “We’ve got a long history,” he said, and that’s not going away overnight.
 

mzkitty

I give up.
Kenneth Moton
‏Verified account @KennethMoton
4m4 minutes ago

#breaking Air Force One is wheels down in Zurich, Switzerland. Pres Trump will take Marine One to nearby Davos for the #WorldEconomicForum. Trump expected to say the 'US is open for business' as he touts his 'America First' but not America alone policy. @ABCPolitics
 

Southside

Veteran Member
The rich and powerful won't let Trump ruin their Davos party


Look around, guys, he already has!


Southside
 
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