CORONA Corona-“Home Remedies”

rhughe13

Heart of Dixie
I haven't tried it yet, but have the Boneset and Goldenrod tincture ready to go for a 102.1 or above fever. A dropper full of each in a glass of water is supposed to induce sweating under cover until the fever breaks. I take 3 tablespoosn elderberry syrup about every other day and have gone through 2 pints since the fall. I am almost out and need to start another batch, so maybe that will be my task this weekend.
 

Samuel Adams

Veteran Member
I’d be interested in your recipe for the elderberry syrup, Rhughe.

Plenty of goldenrod out there. I’ve yet to come across boneset in the wild.
 

Samuel Adams

Veteran Member
Here is another stellar piece from Doc, from the “main” thread.
Forgive my incessance for dragging this stuff into one thread.....
I have to do all my poking around on a cell phone, but when I get to a printer, this stuff is going hard copy, and I want it all in one place. :)


“How To Tell If It’s A Cold, Flu, Or The New Coronavirus

The China coronavirus is rapidly spreading with the number of people infected rising daily, and with it the death toll.
At this moment, NBC News reports that the number of confirmed cases in China has reached almost 10,000, with another 102,000 people reported to be under observation.

The World Health Organization (the WHO) has declared the epidemic a “global emergency” with 23 countries so far confirming cases of Coronavirus.

Of course, those numbers could change rapidly over a few days or even hours.

And yes…
The United States is on that list with 11 cases so far confirmed including a case of person-to-person transmission that raises the threat level of the virus.

So, is it any surprise that more and more people are beginning to wonder… Is that tickle in my throat, the cough that just started, or the fever that hit Coronavirus, or do I just have the common cold or flu?
That’s why we’re breaking down information from the experts on how to tell the difference and when you should be worried about the new virus out of China.

The Symptoms
The biggest problem with determining whether you have a cold, flu, or Coronavirus is that they are all upper respiratory infections. This means that their symptoms are extremely similar.

Every respiratory virus is the same — you get a runny nose, a stuffy nose, a cough, sometimes a sore throat, all because the lining of your nose and throat are damaged. The symptoms are caused by that virus or bacteria damaging the cells of your respiratory tract. It doesn’t matter what virus is causing it.

According to the medical team at Yale, you can generally differentiate between a cold and the flu in this way…
“Flu symptoms are more intense than those associated with a cold and usually come on suddenly, including a fever higher than 100.5 degrees, extreme exhaustion, severe muscle or body aches, a dry cough and chills.”
But, here’s where it gets tricky.

The Yale doctors say that Coronaviruses generally mimic a cold and flu when they first start out but often progress to a much more severe respiratory problem such as pneumonia.

So, how do you know which it is?

“If you don’t have a fever of 100 degrees Fahrenheit or higher that lasts for three to five days, you likely just have the common cold.”

But, according to the CDC, if your symptoms progress to shortness of breath, body aches and chills you could be infected with one of the more dangerous types of the coronavirus.

Beyond that, at this time, you should look at your risk factors and see a doctor whether you think the flu or Coronavirus is behind your symptoms. That’s because Influenza is nothing to scoff at. As of mid-January, we’ve seen 6,600 deaths in the U.S. from flu.

Your Risks
If you’ve been around someone who has recently returned from China, Coronavirus could be behind your symptoms. And, of course, like with every virus, including flu and cold, you’re far more likely to be struck by Coronavirus if you’re older, living with other medical issues, or have a weakened immune system.

Bottom line: When in doubt, don’t mess around. See a doctor!

Protecting Yourself From Coronavirus
In the meantime, it’s vital to take steps to protect yourself from this latest viral outbreak by boosting your immune system so it’s ready to fight if and when it becomes necessary and using basic hygiene precautions.
Things like washing your hands regularly throughout the day, wearing a mask in crowds, and disinfecting items that are touched regularly, like light switches and doorknobs can help limit the spread of all types of viruses, including flu, colds, and Coronavirus.

Supplements To Pump Up Your Immune System

Licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra): Stimulates immune cells called macrophages, stops viral replication of influenza and inactivates the virus. Use it in the form of deglycerized licorice if you have any blood pressure issues, after discussing it with your doctor.
•Tulsi or Holy Basil (Ocimum sanctum): Has antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral activity and stimulates the immune system.
•Garlic (Allium sativum): Has shown antiviral activity against influenza and common cold viruses.
•Coconut (Cocos nucifera): Contains medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA) with potent antiviral activity.
•Ginger (Zingiber officinale): Has antiviral and anti-inflammatory properties.
•Hibiscus tea: Viral pandemic protection in a teacup
•Indian gooseberry, aka amla, (Phyllanthus emblica): Has immune-strengthening and antiviral activity.
•Green tea (Camellia sinensis): Has potent antiviral properties as well as immune enhancement activities.
•Echinacea (Echinacea purpurea): Activates infection-fighting capacity for faster recovery and reduction of symptoms when taken at the first sign of cold or flu.
*Olive Leaf Extract. Olive leaf is an antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, and an anti-parasitic.
•NAC, the flu-fighting supplement that starves cancer.
•Black seed oil pressed from organic black Nigella Sativa seeds that have been highly researched for their ability to act as immune system modulators.

Mushrooms are also vital for immune support: They contain minerals known to be essential to proper immune function including zinc and selenium. They also possess 1,3 beta-glucans, a type of carbohydrate shown in numerous studies to modulate the immune system. Research shows these mushrooms can enhance the immune response to influenza vaccines.

Lastly, consider increasing the amount of vitamin D you take. And here’s why: Research in Africa shows that vitamin D possesses such powerful immunity benefits – your immune system’s T-cells and beta cells also have vitamin D receptors – that it can even help the body fight a virulent invader like HIV-1.

Hopefully, the next few weeks will see the spread of the virus die down thanks to containment and quarantine efforts across the globe. But, it just makes good sense to prepare, get your immune system in good shape, and practice disinfection measures, in order to protect yourself and your family in the meantime.”



And on that note, do we have any naturalist/herbalists in house ?

Doc’s reference to licorice has me intrigued.
Here in Illinois we have a native plant the root of which has a distinct and strong licorice fragrance.
The plant stem is purplish and kinda fuzzy, not smooth. The leaves remind me of tomato plants, especially when small. The plant has a white flower, comes up about the time of the morels, and the deer love to pluck and eat the tops.
Local fishermen use the roots as fish bait enhancement.

Is this a wild licorice that can be used as the licorice referenced in the medical sense ?
 

moldy

Veteran Member
Per Steven Buhner, its the glycyrrhizin that is the antiviral. So if you're using de-glycyrrhizinated licorice, the herb is just for flavor. And yes, those with hypertension need to use it sparingly.
 

forpetesake

Contributing Member
Per Steven Buhner, its the glycyrrhizin that is the antiviral. So if you're using de-glycyrrhizinated licorice, the herb is just for flavor. And yes, those with hypertension need to use it sparingly.
Dang, I just ordered the wrong licorice then. Thanks!!
 

lostinaz

Senior Member
The problem with Vitamin C is that you need more than the body can usually tolerate. You will take an amount and then you will get diarrhea. Your body will say "that's enough!". How do you take more? Liposomal Vitamin C. You encapsulate it inside lecithin. Taking Vitamin C in this form will allow you to take very high concentrations but won't overwhelm your digestive system. You can either buy the patented, commercial form, at about a dollar a packet from LivOn Labs here:

Or make you own, by buying Ascorbic acid, lecithin, vodka, a blender, and an ultrasonic jewelry cleaner.
Here is one example, but you can google it yourself by searching for "liposomal vitamin c". You just need the ingredients above, Vit C, alcohol, water and lecithin.
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b3lazZRyW9c
 

Dozdoats

On TB every waking moment
Asafoetida

AKA hing as a cooking spice. I like it … be warned, a little goes a long way.
=============


Meet Hing: The Secret-Weapon Spice Of Indian Cuisine



June 22, 20163:14 PM ET




A dish full of ground asafoetida, or hing, as it is known in India.
Steven Mark Needham/Getty Images

The moment my boyfriend — now husband — and I got serious about our future together, my father-in-law got serious about teaching me to cook Indian cuisine. My boyfriend was already skilled in the kitchen. But Dr. Jashwant Sharma wanted extra assurance that the dishes from his native country would always have a place in our home. Plus, as he told me recently, he thought I'd like it.

"We mix four, five, six different spices in a single dish. These create a taste and aroma that you don't get in any other food. People exposed to it usually like it," he said.

Even before our cooking sessions, I knew that cumin and coriander are common ingredients and that turmeric will turn your fingers yellow. Hing, however, was something entirely new to me.

Europeans gave it the decidedly unflattering moniker "devil's dung." Even its more common English name, asafoetida, is derived from the Latin for fetid. Those unaccustomed to it can respond negatively to its strong aroma, a mix of sulfur and onions.

Article continues after sponsor message





Hing comes from the resin of giant fennel plants that grow wild in Afghanistan and Iran. The resin can be kept pure, but in the States, you mostly find it ground to a powder and mixed with wheat. In The Book of Spice, author John O'Connell describes how Mughals from the Middle East first brought hing to India in the 16th century.

Many Indians use hing to add umami to an array of savory dishes. But for the uninitiated, hing can be a tough sell. Kate O'Donnell, author of The Everyday Ayurveda Cookbook, says that she only included hing as an optional spice. "For a Western palette, hing can be shocking," she says.


Due to its pungent smell, hing powder is usually stored in an airtight container.
Carolyn Beans/NPR

I first encountered hing in one of our early cooking sessions. My father-in-law whipped its well-sealed white plastic bottle out of the cupboard, added a pinch to the pan, and put it back so quickly that I didn't notice the smell. I was most struck by how it bubbled and then dissolved in the hot ghee (clarified butter). And I was a bit skeptical that a pinch of anything could influence a giant pot of lentils liberally seasoned with three other spices.

Later, while experimenting on my own, I got my first full whiff of the spice. To me, the aroma is far from gag-inducing, but it takes a real leap of faith to add it to food. Once you make that leap, magical things happen.

When cooked, hing's pungent odor mellows to a more mild leek- and garlic-like flavor. Some still smell a hint of sulfur, but for many that quality fades entirely. My father-in-law says that hing has a balancing effect on a dish. "It smooths out the aroma of all the other spices and makes them all very pleasant," he says.

Vikram Sunderam, a James Beard Award winner and chef at the Washington, D.C., Indian restaurants Rasika West End and Rasika Penn Quarter, says that he adds hing to lentil or broccoli dishes. But he uses it judiciously.

"Hing is a very interesting spice, but it has to be used in the right quantity," he cautions. "Even a little bit too much overpowers the whole dish, makes it just taste bitter."

Some believe that hing helps with digestion and can ward off flatulence. Perhaps that's why many — including Sunderam — add it to legumes, broccoli and other potentially gas-inducing vegetables.

Some Indians also use it as a substitute for garlic and onions — ingredients discouraged by certain Eastern religions and Ayurvedic medicine.

That substitution makes sense to Gary Takeoka, a food chemist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Takeoka studied hing's volatiles — the chemical compounds that produce smells. "A major proportion of hing's volatiles are sulfur compounds," he explains. "Some of these are similar to the ones found in onions and garlic."

Hing also has many traditional medicinal uses in India and beyond. In India, it's believed to help with everything from kidney stones to bronchitis. In Afghanistan, it's thought to cure whooping cough and ulcers. In Egypt, it's considered a diuretic.

You can find hing in food outside of Indian cuisine, too. You may have encountered it in Worcestershire sauce. It's also added to some Middle Eastern dishes. But in this age of global food fusion, I'm surprised that hing's reach hasn't expanded.

My own family's culinary identity is Slovak. While I can't speak for all Slovak cuisine, the select dishes that reached through three generations to my kitchen table don't offer much in the way of spice. We season pierogies with salt and pepper, and lima bean soup with vinegar.

I can imagine my great uncle's protest if I were to add chili or cumin to our food. It would change the traditional taste too much. But a tiny dash of hing? That's something we might all be able to get behind. Especially in the bean soup.
 

raven

Has No Life - Lives on TB
Asafoetida

AKA hing as a cooking spice. I like it … be warned, a little goes a long way.
=============


Meet Hing: The Secret-Weapon Spice Of Indian Cuisine



June 22, 20163:14 PM ET




A dish full of ground asafoetida, or hing, as it is known in India.
Steven Mark Needham/Getty Images

The moment my boyfriend — now husband — and I got serious about our future together, my father-in-law got serious about teaching me to cook Indian cuisine. My boyfriend was already skilled in the kitchen. But Dr. Jashwant Sharma wanted extra assurance that the dishes from his native country would always have a place in our home. Plus, as he told me recently, he thought I'd like it.

"We mix four, five, six different spices in a single dish. These create a taste and aroma that you don't get in any other food. People exposed to it usually like it," he said.

Even before our cooking sessions, I knew that cumin and coriander are common ingredients and that turmeric will turn your fingers yellow. Hing, however, was something entirely new to me.

Europeans gave it the decidedly unflattering moniker "devil's dung." Even its more common English name, asafoetida, is derived from the Latin for fetid. Those unaccustomed to it can respond negatively to its strong aroma, a mix of sulfur and onions.

Article continues after sponsor message





Hing comes from the resin of giant fennel plants that grow wild in Afghanistan and Iran. The resin can be kept pure, but in the States, you mostly find it ground to a powder and mixed with wheat. In The Book of Spice, author John O'Connell describes how Mughals from the Middle East first brought hing to India in the 16th century.

Many Indians use hing to add umami to an array of savory dishes. But for the uninitiated, hing can be a tough sell. Kate O'Donnell, author of The Everyday Ayurveda Cookbook, says that she only included hing as an optional spice. "For a Western palette, hing can be shocking," she says.


Due to its pungent smell, hing powder is usually stored in an airtight container.
Carolyn Beans/NPR

I first encountered hing in one of our early cooking sessions. My father-in-law whipped its well-sealed white plastic bottle out of the cupboard, added a pinch to the pan, and put it back so quickly that I didn't notice the smell. I was most struck by how it bubbled and then dissolved in the hot ghee (clarified butter). And I was a bit skeptical that a pinch of anything could influence a giant pot of lentils liberally seasoned with three other spices.

Later, while experimenting on my own, I got my first full whiff of the spice. To me, the aroma is far from gag-inducing, but it takes a real leap of faith to add it to food. Once you make that leap, magical things happen.

When cooked, hing's pungent odor mellows to a more mild leek- and garlic-like flavor. Some still smell a hint of sulfur, but for many that quality fades entirely. My father-in-law says that hing has a balancing effect on a dish. "It smooths out the aroma of all the other spices and makes them all very pleasant," he says.

Vikram Sunderam, a James Beard Award winner and chef at the Washington, D.C., Indian restaurants Rasika West End and Rasika Penn Quarter, says that he adds hing to lentil or broccoli dishes. But he uses it judiciously.

"Hing is a very interesting spice, but it has to be used in the right quantity," he cautions. "Even a little bit too much overpowers the whole dish, makes it just taste bitter."

Some believe that hing helps with digestion and can ward off flatulence. Perhaps that's why many — including Sunderam — add it to legumes, broccoli and other potentially gas-inducing vegetables.

Some Indians also use it as a substitute for garlic and onions — ingredients discouraged by certain Eastern religions and Ayurvedic medicine.

That substitution makes sense to Gary Takeoka, a food chemist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Takeoka studied hing's volatiles — the chemical compounds that produce smells. "A major proportion of hing's volatiles are sulfur compounds," he explains. "Some of these are similar to the ones found in onions and garlic."

Hing also has many traditional medicinal uses in India and beyond. In India, it's believed to help with everything from kidney stones to bronchitis. In Afghanistan, it's thought to cure whooping cough and ulcers. In Egypt, it's considered a diuretic.

You can find hing in food outside of Indian cuisine, too. You may have encountered it in Worcestershire sauce. It's also added to some Middle Eastern dishes. But in this age of global food fusion, I'm surprised that hing's reach hasn't expanded.

My own family's culinary identity is Slovak. While I can't speak for all Slovak cuisine, the select dishes that reached through three generations to my kitchen table don't offer much in the way of spice. We season pierogies with salt and pepper, and lima bean soup with vinegar.

I can imagine my great uncle's protest if I were to add chili or cumin to our food. It would change the traditional taste too much. But a tiny dash of hing? That's something we might all be able to get behind. Especially in the bean soup.
That's the stuff . . . I call it "gag a maggot" . . . ever since I will only eat that burnt chicken they rave about if tricked into sharing a meal. Barf.
 

China Connection

TB Fanatic
With my time working in Asia I have found that going fully vegetarian once you have a virus cuts down strongly the time you hold onto the virus.

Stay away from acid foods including all meats. Straight chicken soup however helps but you only need the liquid.

A top multi mineral tablet would help

Humic and fulvic acid can help a lot but buy powder and make your own up and don't store once made up.
 

Samuel Adams

Veteran Member
Thanks for that spicey note, Doz.....

My late wife did a lot of research into ethnic and traditional cooking.
Oddly enough, most cuisine of old was tailored toward health, immunity and to energize and replenish a very hard working body.
(That hard work beneficially activates things in the body that nothing else will, but that’s for another thread?)

Odd that the “American diet” does just about everything possible to prevent the body performing at its peak......
 

xtreme_right

Veteran Member
I was at the local store looking for zinc losenges but could only find Zicam losenges, which are homeopathic. I didn’t want to buy without researching. Now I’ve found another homeopathic cold medicine also in all the local stores, called Natures Way Umcka cold care. Does anyone have experience with either of these?
 

summerthyme

Administrator
_______________
We've used Zicam gel for years... it's VERY effective against the common cold viruses. When they pulled it off the market (it's now been reformulated, but I haven't tried the newer stuff yet) I quickly bought a dozen bottles and stashed them. I personally think that they are misusing the term "homeopathic", as this doesn't have the "essence of zinc", but contains actual zinc...

Summerthyme
 

moldy

Veteran Member
While this isn't exactly a 'home' remedy, I"m just throwing it out there. Chest postural drainage is impossible to do on yourself (or at least REALLY challenging) and can be difficult to do on others. There is a device that does the same thing and is available OTC. The RTs I work with call it a pickle, but the actual name is an Acapella vibratory PEP therapy system. It is a device that you exhale into and it vibrates to loosen up all the gunk down deep in your lungs. I think this is a great prep for flu/CV/respiratory illnesses.
 
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