CORONA Confirmed American Cases of Coronavirus

jward

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jward

passin' thru
In a matter of days, millions of Americans have been asked to do what might have been unthinkable only a week or two ago: Don’t go to work, don’t go to school, don’t leave the house at all, unless you have to.


The directives to keep people at home to stunt the spread of the coronavirus began in California, and have quickly been adopted across the country. By Wednesday, more than a dozen states and the Navajo Nation had called on their residents to stay at home as much as possible, with many cities and counties joining in.


This means at least 179 million people in 18 states, 31 counties and 13 cities are being urged to stay home.

People can generally still leave their homes for necessities — to go to the grocery store, to go to the doctor and to get fresh air. Still, the changes so fundamentally alter American life that some states, like Texas, have been hesitant to adopt them. A number of states — Kentucky, Maryland and Nevada, for example — have walked up to the line, closing down all non-essential businesses and verbally asking people to be safe at home.


Other leaders described the decision as agonizing but necessary. “We are at war,” Gov. Mike DeWine of Ohio said.


The result is a patchwork of local and state directives that use a variety of terms, like “shelter in place,” or “safer at home.” But the stunning effect is the same: More than half of all Americans will soon be under instructions to stay at home. See how the orders affect each state in the list below.

 

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passin' thru
Alaska
Anchorage Mayor Ethan Berkowitz issued an order asking all residents to “hunker down,” in order to stop the virus from overwhelming the health care system. “We cannot let what is happening in other parts of the world happen here,” he said.


Anchorage About 292,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 22

See announcement | Read local coverage



California About 39.6 million people
California, America’s most populous state, was the first to order all residents to stay home. Others quickly followed suit. “This is not a permanent state, this is a moment in time,” Gov. Gavin Newsom said. “We will look back at these decisions as pivotal.”


Stay at home, effective March 19

See announcement | Read local coverage



Colorado
Denver, Boulder and Pitkin County, which includes Aspen, are among the areas issuing orders for residents to stay home. "Frankly, voluntary ‘distancing’ is simply not enough,” Mayor Michael B. Hancock of Denver said, urging all residents to stay home and businesses to allow their employees work remotely. Marijuana stores with "extreme physical distancing in place" are exempt from the Denver order.


Boulder About 107,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 24 at 5 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Denver About 716,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 24 at 5 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Archuleta County About 14,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 23

See announcement | Read local coverage



La Plata County About 56,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 23

See announcement | Read local coverage



Pitkin County About 18,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 23

See announcement | Read local coverage



Connecticut About 3.6 million people
“At this critical time it is essential that everyone just stay home,” Gov. Ned Lamont said.


Stay at home, effective March 23 at 8 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Delaware About 973,000 people
“I don’t want Delaware to be the example of what not to do in response to this crisis,” Gov. John Carney said.


Shelter in place, effective March 24 at 8 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Florida
Gov. Ron DeSantis said he did not plan to order all Floridians to stay at home, in part because of the unknown risks of extended confinement. At the same time, places like Miami and Leon County, which includes Tallahassee, have issued their own orders.


Miami About 471,000 people

Shelter in place, effective March 24 at 11:59 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Miami Beach About 92,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 24 at 12:01 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Alachua County About 270,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 24 at 12:01 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Leon County About 293,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 25 at 11 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Orange County About 1.4 million people

Stay at home, effective March 26 at 11 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Georgia
The mayor of Atlanta issued an order for residents to stay at home, going further than the governor's directive for all of Georgia. “Given our population density, high rate of asthma, and various underlying health conditions found within our city’s populations, I am issuing a Stay at Home Order for Atlantans," Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms said in a statement to The Atlanta Journal Constitution.


Atlanta About 498,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 24 at 12 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Savannah About 146,000 people

Shelter in place, effective March 24 at 11:59 p.m

See announcement | Read local coverage



Hawaii About 1.4 million people
As in other states, there are exceptions to the stay-at-home order in Hawaii, including leaving the house to go surfing and swimming. But the governor's office said violations could be punishable by a fine of up to $5,000, or as much as one year in jail. “The threat of COVID-19 is unprecedented and requires aggressive action," Gov. David Ige said.


Stay at home, effective March 25 at 12:01 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Idaho
“Our number one priority is to slow the spread of the virus in that community and outside of it,” Gov. Brad Little said.


Blaine County About 23,000 people

Shelter in place, effective March 20

See announcement | Read local coverage



Illinois About 12.7 million people
“I don’t come to this decision easily,” Gov. J.B. Pritzker said. “I fully recognize that, in some cases, I am choosing between people’s lives and saving people’s livelihood. But ultimately, you can’t have a livelihood if you don’t have your life.”


Stay at home, effective March 21 at 5 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



 

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Indiana About 6.7 million people
Gov. Eric J. Holcomb asked "Hoosiers to hunker down." He added: “You must be part of the solution, not the problem.”


Stay at home, effective March 24 at 11:59 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Kansas
Several municipalities in Kansas issued stay-at-home instructions in quick succession, including counties that are in the greater Kansas City region.


Douglas County About 121,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 24 at 12:01 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Johnson County About 598,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 24 at 12:01 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Leavenworth County About 81,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 24

See announcement | Read local coverage



Sedgwick County About 514,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 25 at 12:01 a.m.

See announcement



Wyandotte County About 165,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 24 at 12:01 a.m.

Read local coverage



Louisiana About 4.6 million people
“If we want to flatten the curve, we have to take action today,” Gov. John Bel Edwards said. New Orleans had previously issued its own order.


Stay at home, effective March 23 at 5 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Massachusetts About 6.9 million people
Gov. Charlie Baker stopped short of declaring a formal order, but announced an advisory for residents to stay home. “I do not believe I can or should order U.S. citizens to be confined to their home for days on end,” he said. “It doesn’t make sense from a public health point of view, and it’s not realistic.”


Stay at home advisory, effective March 24 at 12 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Michigan About 10 million people
“Without a comprehensive national strategy, we, the states, must take action,” Gov. Gretchen Whitmer said, urging residents to stay home.


Stay at home, effective March 24 at 12:01 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Mississippi



Oxford About 25,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 22

See announcement | Read local coverage



Missouri
Residents in the Kansas City, St. Louis and St. Louis County areas are among those under instructions to stay at home. “I wish we did not have to do this,” Mayor Lyda Krewson of St. Louis said Saturday. “This situation will only get worse — much worse — if we don’t act right now.”


Kansas City About 492,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 24 at 12:01 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



St. Louis About 303,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 23 at 6 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Clay County About 246,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 24 at 12:01 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



St. Louis County About 1 million people

Stay at home, effective March 23 at 12:01 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



New Jersey About 8.9 million people
“We know the virus spreads through person-to-person contact, and the best way to prevent further exposure is to limit our public interactions,” Gov. Phil Murphy said.


Stay at home, effective March 21 at 9 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



New Mexico About 2.1 million people
Addressing questions about whether she was issuing a shelter-in-place order, Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham said that “the tantamount effect of what we’re doing is basically the same.” She added: “This is quite frankly an instruction to stay home.”


Stay at home, effective March 24 at 8 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



New York About 19.5 million people
Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo has shied away from the language of a shelter-in-place order, which he said evoked images of shooter situations or nuclear war. “Words matter,” the governor said, instead describing it as putting all of New York on pause. “This is the most drastic action we can take,” he said.


Stay at home, effective March 22 at 8 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



 

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North Carolina
Mecklenburg County, which includes Charlotte, was under instructions to stay at home, in part to help save hospitals from being overloaded. “The higher level of compliance we get with this proclamation, the shorter it will be,” the county manager, Dena R. Diorio, said.


Mecklenburg County About 1.1 million people

Stay at home, effective March 26 at 8 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Ohio About 11.7 million people
Gov. Mike DeWine has been notably aggressive in his response to the coronavirus, and Ohio was among the first wave of states to adopt this measure. “We haven’t faced an enemy like we are facing today in 102 years,” he said. “We are at war.”


Stay at home, effective March 23 at 11:59 pm.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Oregon About 4.2 million people
Gov. Kate Brown took the action after seeing the state’s scenic trails and beaches packed with people over the weekend. “If you're still not sure about an activity, skip it,” she said. “Staying home will save lives.”


Stay at home, effective March 23

See announcement | Read local coverage



Pennsylvania

Gov. Tom Wolf issued an order for seven of the hardest-hit counties in the state, including the regions around Philadelphia and Pittsburgh. “Residents must stay home unless someone’s life depends on leaving,” he said.

Allegheny County About 1.2 million people

Stay at home, effective March 23 at 8 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Bucks County About 628,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 23 at 8 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Chester County About 522,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 23 at 8 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Delaware County About 565,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 23 at 8 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Erie County About 272,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 24 at 8 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Monroe County About 170,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 23 at 8 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Montgomery County About 829,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 23 at 8 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Philadelphia County About 1.6 million people

Stay at home, effective March 23 at 8 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Tennessee
Residents in the Nashville and Memphis areas are under instructions to stay at home as much as possible. In Nashville, known for its live music, local artists and venues are offering concerts streamed online. "Thank you for helping us keep our neighbors and loved ones safe," the mayor of Nashville, John Cooper, said.


Franklin About 81,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 25 at 12:01 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Memphis About 651,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 24 at 6 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Davidson County About 693,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 23

See announcement | Read local coverage



Texas
Gov. Greg Abbott has left it to local officials to impose the most restrictive orders, but millions of people in the most populous areas have been told to stay home, including Harris County, which includes Houston, Dallas and Tarrant counties in the Dallas-Fort Worth region, and Bexar County, which includes San Antonio. “Another person has died within the last 24 hours,” said Clay Jenkins, the Dallas County judge. “We’re headed to a point of no return, if we continue to dawdle.”


Austin About 964,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 24 at 11:59 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Bexar County About 2 million people

Stay at home, effective March 24 at 11:59 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Collin County About 1 million people

Stay at home, effective March 24

See announcement | Read local coverage



Dallas County About 2.6 million people

Shelter in place, effective March 23 at 11:59 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



El Paso County About 841,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 24 at 11:59 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Harris County About 4.7 million people

Stay at home, effective March 24 at 11:59 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Hunt County About 96,000 people

Shelter in place, effective March 24 at 11:59 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Tarrant County About 2.1 million people

Stay at home, effective March 24 at 11:59 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Vermont About 626,000 people
“I need all Vermonters to understand that the more quickly and closely we follow these stay-at-home measures, the faster and safer we can get through this and get our daily lives, and our economy, moving again," Gov. Phil Scott said.


Stay at home, effective March 25 at 5 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Washington About 7.5 million people
Gov. Jay Inslee tried begging people to stay at home in Washington State, which has among the worst outbreaks of the virus in the country. Then he made it mandatory. “The fastest way to get back to normal is to hit this hard,” he said.


Stay at home, effective March 23

See announcement | Read local coverage








 

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West Virginia About 1.8 million people
West Virginia was the last state to have a confirmed case of the virus, but Gov. Jim Justice quickly joined a chorus of other governors calling on residents to stay inside. “A stay-at-home order is not martial law,” he said, reminding residents that they could still leave their homes for food and outdoor activity. But he warned: “The magnitude of this is unbelievable.”


Stay at home, effective March 24 at 8 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Wisconsin About 5.8 million people
Gov. Tony Evers initially thought he would not have to issue such an order, but later changed his mind. “You can still get out and walk the dogs — it’s good exercise and it’s good for everyone’s mental health — but please don’t take any other unnecessary trips," he said. "Limit your travel to essential needs like going to the doctor, grabbing groceries or getting medication.”


Stay at home, effective March 25 at 8 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage




 

jward

passin' thru
1585451253166.png
In a matter of days, millions of Americans have been asked to do what might have been unthinkable only a week or two ago: Don’t go to work, don’t go to school, don’t leave the house at all, unless you have to.


The directives to keep people at home to stunt the spread of the coronavirus began in California, and have quickly been adopted across the country. By Saturday, more than half the states and the Navajo Nation had told their residents to stay at home as much as possible, with many cities and counties joining in.


This means at least 229 million people in at least 26 states, 66 counties, 14 cities and one territory are being urged to stay home.

People can generally still leave their homes for necessities — to go to the grocery store, to go to the doctor and to get fresh air. Still, the changes so fundamentally alter American life that some states, like Texas, have been hesitant to adopt them. A few states — Maryland and Nevada, for example — have walked up to the line, closing down all non-essential businesses but not issuing formal orders for people to stay home. In other states, leaders described the decision as agonizing but necessary.


“We are at war,” Gov. Mike DeWine of Ohio said.


The result is a patchwork of local and state directives that use a variety of terms, like “shelter in place,” or “safer at home.” The stunning effect is the same: About seven in 10 Americans are or will soon be under instructions to stay at home.


Here is a guide to how the orders affect each state in the list below.
 

jward

passin' thru
Alabama
Gov. Kay Ivey said she did not plan to issue a statewide order, saying that she wanted to balance the health of the state's residents with the health of the economy. "Y’all, we are not California, we’re not New York, we aren’t even Louisiana," she said on a conference call with reporters, according to AL.com. Birmingham, the largest city in the state, has issued a shelter-in-place order for its residents.


Birmingham About 210,000 people

Shelter in place, effective March 24 at 12 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Alaska
Anchorage Mayor Ethan Berkowitz issued an order asking all residents to “hunker down,” in order to stop the virus from overwhelming the health care system. “We cannot let what is happening in other parts of the world happen here,” he said.


Anchorage About 292,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 22

See announcement | Read local coverage



California About 39.6 million people
California, America’s most populous state, was the first to order all residents to stay home. Others quickly followed suit. “This is not a permanent state, this is a moment in time,” Gov. Gavin Newsom said. “We will look back at these decisions as pivotal.”


Stay at home, effective March 19

See announcement | Read local coverage



Colorado About 5.7 million people
A number of counties and cities in the state, including Denver and Boulder, had issued their own stay-at-home orders, but Gov. Jared Polis also issued a statewide order, reiterating the need for everyone to stay at home. “We owe it to ourselves and our fellow Americans in order to save lives,” he said.


Stay at home, effective March 26 at 6 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Connecticut About 3.6 million people
“At this critical time it is essential that everyone just stay home,” Gov. Ned Lamont said.


Stay at home, effective March 23 at 8 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Delaware About 973,000 people
“I don’t want Delaware to be the example of what not to do in response to this crisis,” Gov. John Carney said.


Shelter in place, effective March 24 at 8 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Florida
Gov. Ron DeSantis said he did not plan to order all Floridians to stay at home, in part because of the unknown risks of extended confinement. At the same time, places like Leon County, which includes Tallahassee, have issued their own orders and the mayor of Miami-Dade County clarified that other orders he issued amounted to an order for residents to stay home unless necessary. "The rules are already applying to you," he said.


Alachua County About 270,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 24 at 12:01 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Broward County About 2 million people

Shelter in place, effective March 27 at 12:01 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Hillsborough County About 1.4 million people

Safer at home, effective March 27 at 10 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Leon County About 293,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 25 at 11 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Miami-Dade County About 2.8 million people

Stay at home, effective March 25

See announcement | Read local coverage



Orange County About 1.4 million people

Stay at home, effective March 26 at 11 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Osceola County About 368,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 26 at 11 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Pinellas County About 975,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 26 at 12 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Georgia
The mayor of Atlanta issued an order for residents to stay at home, going further than the governor's directive for all of Georgia. “Given our population density, high rate of asthma, and various underlying health conditions found within our city’s populations, I am issuing a Stay at Home Order for Atlantans," Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms said in a statement to The Atlanta Journal Constitution.


Atlanta About 498,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 24 at 12 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Blakely About 5,000 people

Shelter in place, effective March 24 at 12 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Carrollton About 26,000 people

Shelter in place, effective March 25

See announcement | Read local coverage



Savannah About 146,000 people

Shelter in place, effective March 24 at 11:59 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Athens-Clarke County About 126,000 people

Shelter in place, effective March 20 at 12:01 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Dougherty County About 91,000 people

Shelter in place, effective March 21 at 12:01 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Hawaii About 1.4 million people
As in other states, there are exceptions to the stay-at-home order in Hawaii, including leaving the house to go surfing and swimming. But the governor's office said violations could be punishable by a fine of up to $5,000, or as much as one year in jail. “The threat of COVID-19 is unprecedented and requires aggressive action," Gov. David Ige said.


Stay at home, effective March 25 at 12:01 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Idaho About 1.8 million people
“Our health care and public safety workers are putting themselves in harm’s way to respond to the coronavirus emergency, and we owe it to them to do our part by following this statewide stay-home order,” Gov. Brad Little said.


Stay at home, effective March 25

See announcement | Read local coverage



 

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passin' thru
Illinois About 12.7 million people
“I don’t come to this decision easily,” Gov. J.B. Pritzker said. “I fully recognize that, in some cases, I am choosing between people’s lives and saving people’s livelihood. But ultimately, you can’t have a livelihood if you don’t have your life.”


Stay at home, effective March 21 at 5 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Indiana About 6.7 million people
Gov. Eric J. Holcomb asked "Hoosiers to hunker down." He added: “You must be part of the solution, not the problem.”


Stay at home, effective March 24 at 11:59 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Kansas About 2.9 million people
After several municipalities in Kansas issued stay-at-home instructions in quick succession, including in the greater Kansas City region, Gov. Laura Kelly issued a statewide order. "While I left these decisions to local health departments as long as possible," she said, "the reality is that the patchwork approach that has developed is inconsistent and is a recipe for chaos."


Stay at home, effective March 30 at 12:01 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Kentucky About 4.5 million people
Gov. Andy Beshear ordered all non-essential businesses to stop operating in-person services by March 26 and urged residents to stay "healthy at home." In a news conference on March 27, he clarified that the state's campaign amounted to telling residents to stay home. "That doesn't mean you need to cower down in your home," he said. But "you stay at home, unless you are getting groceries or other supplies that you may need."


Healthy at home, effective March 26 at 8 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Louisiana About 4.6 million people
“If we want to flatten the curve, we have to take action today,” Gov. John Bel Edwards said. New Orleans had previously issued its own order.


Stay at home, effective March 23 at 5 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Maine
“We all need to function as if we have the virus,” Portland's city manager, Jon Jennings, said.


Portland About 66,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 25 at 5 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Massachusetts About 6.9 million people
Gov. Charlie Baker stopped short of declaring a formal order, but announced an advisory for residents to stay home. “I do not believe I can or should order U.S. citizens to be confined to their home for days on end,” he said. “It doesn’t make sense from a public health point of view, and it’s not realistic.”


Stay at home advisory, effective March 24 at 12 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Michigan About 10 million people
“Without a comprehensive national strategy, we, the states, must take action,” Gov. Gretchen Whitmer said, urging residents to stay home.


Stay at home, effective March 24 at 12:01 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Minnesota About 5.6 million people
Gov. Tim Walz emphasized the need to slow the spread of the virus over time and not overwhelm hospitals in Minnesota. "We are asking you — because it is going to take cooperation and collaboration — stay home," he said.


Stay at home, effective March 27 at 11:59 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Mississippi
The mayor of Oxford, Robyn Tannehill, asked "every single citizen of Oxford to do their part."


Oxford About 25,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 22

See announcement | Read local coverage



 

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passin' thru
Missouri
Residents in the Kansas City, St. Louis and St. Louis County areas are among those under instructions to stay at home. “I wish we did not have to do this,” Mayor Lyda Krewson of St. Louis said Saturday. “This situation will only get worse — much worse — if we don’t act right now.”


Kansas City About 492,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 24 at 12:01 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



St. Joseph About 76,000 people

Shelter in place, effective March 24 at 12:01 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



St. Louis About 303,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 23 at 6 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Boone County About 180,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 25 at 8 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Cass County About 105,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 24 at 12:01 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Clay County About 246,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 24 at 12:01 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Cole County About 77,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 23

See announcement | Read local coverage



Greene County About 292,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 26 at 12:01 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Jackson County About 700,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 24 at 12:01 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Jefferson County About 224,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 24 at 12:01 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Platte County About 103,000 people

Shelter in place, effective March 24 at 12:01 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Randolph County About 25,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 25 at 8 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Ray County About 23,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 25 at 12:01 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



St. Louis County About 1 million people

Stay at home, effective March 23 at 12:01 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Montana About 1.1 million people
"We cannot rebuild our economic strength without doing everything we can now to flatten the curve and slow the spread of this virus," Gov. Steve Bullock said.


Stay at home, effective March 28 at 12:01 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



New Hampshire About 1.4 million people
Gov. Chris Sununu had earlier described a stay-at-home order as not a "practical ask" of residents, but later put one in place. "We can't stress this enough — you should stay at your house unless absolutely necessary," he said.


Stay at home, effective March 27 at 11:59 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



New Jersey About 8.9 million people
“We know the virus spreads through person-to-person contact, and the best way to prevent further exposure is to limit our public interactions,” Gov. Phil Murphy said.


Stay at home, effective March 21 at 9 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



New Mexico About 2.1 million people
Addressing questions about whether she was issuing a shelter-in-place order, Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham said that “the tantamount effect of what we’re doing is basically the same.” She added: “This is quite frankly an instruction to stay home.”


Stay at home, effective March 24 at 8 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



New York About 19.5 million people
Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo has shied away from the language of a shelter-in-place order, which he said evoked images of shooter situations or nuclear war. “Words matter,” the governor said, instead describing it as putting all of New York on pause. “This is the most drastic action we can take,” he said.


Stay at home, effective March 22 at 8 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



North Carolina About 10.4 million people
A number of cities and counties in North Carolina had already ordered their residents to stay home, but Gov. Roy Cooper made it official statewide. "Even if you don’t think you have to worry about yourself, consider our nurses, doctors, custodial staff & other hospital workers who will be stretched beyond their capacity if we are unable to slow the spread of this disease," he said on Twitter.


Stay at home, effective March 30 at 5 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Ohio About 11.7 million people
Gov. Mike DeWine has been notably aggressive in his response to the coronavirus, and Ohio was among the first wave of states to adopt this measure. “We haven’t faced an enemy like we are facing today in 102 years,” he said. “We are at war.”


Stay at home, effective March 23 at 11:59 pm.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Oklahoma
Gov. Kevin Stitt has told vulnerable Oklahomans to stay home. The city of Norman, home to the University of Oklahoma, ordered all of its residents to do so. "We in Oklahoma are no strangers to natural disasters," Mayor Breea Clark said in a video announcment. "Covid-19 is here."


Norman About 123,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 25 at 11:59 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Oregon About 4.2 million people
Gov. Kate Brown took the action after seeing the state’s scenic trails and beaches packed with people over the weekend. “If you're still not sure about an activity, skip it,” she said. “Staying home will save lives.”


Stay at home, effective March 23

See announcement | Read local coverage



 

jward

passin' thru
Pennsylvania
Gov. Tom Wolf issued an order for seven of the hardest-hit counties in the state, including the regions around Philadelphia and Pittsburgh. “Residents must stay home unless someone’s life depends on leaving,” he said.


Allegheny County About 1.2 million people

Stay at home, effective March 23 at 8 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Bucks County About 628,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 23 at 8 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Chester County About 522,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 23 at 8 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Delaware County About 565,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 23 at 8 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Erie County About 272,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 24 at 8 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Lehigh County About 368,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 25 at 8 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Monroe County About 170,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 23 at 8 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Montgomery County About 829,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 23 at 8 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Northampton County About 305,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 25 at 8 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Philadelphia County About 1.6 million people

Stay at home, effective March 23 at 8 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Puerto Rico About 3.2 million people
Gov. Wanda Vázquez issued an order imposing a nightly curfew and allowing people to leave their homes during the day only to buy groceries or medicine, go to the bank, attend medical appointments, tend to caregiving responsibilities or work in businesses deemed essential. “All citizens will have to stay home to stop the spread of this virus,” she said.


Curfew, effective March 15 at 6 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



South Carolina
The virus has begun to accelerate in South Carolina, Mayor John J. Tecklenburg of Charleston said at a news conference. "We must now take more dramatic action," he said, "while there is still time to save thousands of lives."


Charleston About 136,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 26 at 12:01 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Tennessee
Residents in the Nashville and Memphis areas are under instructions to stay at home as much as possible. In Nashville, known for its live music, local artists and venues are offering concerts streamed online. "Thank you for helping us keep our neighbors and loved ones safe," the mayor of Nashville, John Cooper, said.


Franklin About 81,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 25 at 12:01 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Davidson County About 693,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 23

See announcement | Read local coverage



Knox County About 465,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 24 at 12:01 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Shelby County About 936,000 people

Shelter in place, effective March 24

See announcement | Read local coverage






 

jward

passin' thru
Texas

Gov. Greg Abbott has left it to local officials to impose the most restrictive orders, but millions of people in the nation's second largest state have been told to stay home, including in Harris County, which includes Houston; Dallas and Tarrant Counties in the Dallas-Fort Worth region; and Bexar County, which includes San Antonio. “Another person has died within the last 24 hours,” said Clay Jenkins, the Dallas County judge. “We’re headed to a point of no return, if we continue to dawdle.”



Bell County About 356,000 people

Shelter in place, effective March 23 at 11:59 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Bexar County About 2 million people

Stay at home, effective March 24 at 11:59 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Brazoria County About 370,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 26 at 6 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Cameron County About 424,000 people

Shelter in place, effective March 25 at 12:01 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Chambers County About 42,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 24 at 11:59 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Collin County About 1 million people

Stay at home, effective March 24

See announcement | Read local coverage



Dallas County About 2.6 million people

Shelter in place, effective March 23 at 11:59 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Denton County About 859,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 25 at 11:59 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



El Paso County About 841,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 24 at 11:59 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Ellis County About 179,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 25 at 11:59 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage


 

jward

passin' thru

Fort Bend County About 788,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 25 at 12:01 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Galveston County About 338,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 24 at 11:59 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Gregg County About 124,000 people

Shelter in place, effective March 26 at 11:59 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Harris County About 4.7 million people

Stay at home, effective March 24 at 11:59 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Hays County About 223,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 26 at 11 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Hildalgo County About 866,000 people

Shelter at home, effective March 26 at 11:59 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Hunt County About 96,000 people

Shelter in place, effective March 24 at 11:59 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Kaufman County About 129,000 people

Shelter in place, effective March 25 at 11:59 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Liberty County About 86,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 24 at 11:59 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



McLennan County About 255,000 people

Shelter in place, effective March 23 at 11:59 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Nueces County About 362,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 26 at 11:59 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Polk County About 50,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 27 at 11:59 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Robertson County About 17,000 people

Shelter in place, effective March 25 at 9 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Rockwall County About 101,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 24 at 11:59 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



San Jacinto County About 29,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 25

See announcement | Read local coverage



Scurry County About 17,000 people

Shelter in place, effective March 27 at 11:59 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Starr County About 65,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 25 at 12:01 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Tarrant County About 2.1 million people

Stay at home, effective March 24 at 11:59 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Travis County About 1.2 million people

Stay at home, effective March 24 at 11:59 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Willacy County About 22,000 people

Shelter in place, effective March 26 at 11:01 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Williamson County About 567,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 24 at 11:59 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage


 

jward

passin' thru
Utah
Summit County, a popular area for skiing and tourism, became the first in Utah to issue such a restriction, The Salt Lake Tribune reported. “This decision was not made lightly but is in the best interest of public health,” said Dr. Rich Bullough, the county health director. "Our cases per capita rival those of the worst areas of New York City and many parts of Italy."


Summit County About 42,000 people

Stay at home, effective March 27 at 12:01 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Vermont About 626,000 people
“I need all Vermonters to understand that the more quickly and closely we follow these stay-at-home measures, the faster and safer we can get through this and get our daily lives, and our economy, moving again," Gov. Phil Scott said.


Stay at home, effective March 25 at 5 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Washington About 7.5 million people
Gov. Jay Inslee tried begging people to stay at home in Washington State, which has among the worst outbreaks of the virus in the country. Then he made it mandatory. “The fastest way to get back to normal is to hit this hard,” he said.


Stay at home, effective March 23

See announcement | Read local coverage



West Virginia About 1.8 million people
West Virginia was the last state to have a confirmed case of the virus, but Gov. Jim Justice quickly joined a chorus of other governors calling on residents to stay inside. “A stay-at-home order is not martial law,” he said, reminding residents that they could still leave their homes for food and outdoor activity. But he warned: “The magnitude of this is unbelievable.”


Stay at home, effective March 24 at 8 p.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



Wisconsin About 5.8 million people
Gov. Tony Evers initially thought he would not have to issue such an order, but later changed his mind. “You can still get out and walk the dogs — it’s good exercise and it’s good for everyone’s mental health — but please don’t take any other unnecessary trips," he said. "Limit your travel to essential needs like going to the doctor, grabbing groceries or getting medication.”


Stay at home, effective March 25 at 8 a.m.

See announcement | Read local coverage



 

jward

passin' thru
Latest Updates

March 29 (GMT)
March 28 (GMT)
  • 19452 new cases and 525 new deaths in the United States
    New York Governor Cuomo Daily Briefing:

    • Everything we do now (procure ventilators etc) is in preparation for possible apex (when curve hits the highest point)
    • Apex in New York is estimated in 14-21 days from now
    • We'll keep COVID-19 patients separated from the other patients in hospitals
    • We can now test for antibodies to determine whether a person had COVID-19. This is a blood test
    • 172 new ICU admission in the last day, vs. 374 in the preceding day, may indicate a decline in the growth rate
    • 155,934 people tested in New York State
    • We need a faster testing process. Can't wait 5 days as it is now. Other countries now also have home tests. We should do the same
March 27 (GMT)
  • alert
    18691 new cases and 401 new deaths in the United States

    NEW YORK (from New York Governor Cuomo daily briefing):
    • Apex of hospital need could be in 21 days from now in New York
    • All hospitals need to increase capacity by 50%, some by 100%
    • Need a total of 140,000 hospital beds. Currently have 53,000 (an additional 87,000 hospital beds are needed)
    • Need a total of 40,000 ICU beds. Currently have 3,000, with 3,000 ventilators. An additional 37,000 ICU beds are needed
    • Will use college dormitories, hotels, nursing homes, and all possible space by converting it to hospitals if needed in April
    • 138,376 people have been tested
    • Schools will stay closed for an additional 2 weeks after April 1, to then reassess the situation and extend again if needed. 180 days requirement has been waived
    • "This is not going to be a short deployment [...] This is going to be weeks, and weeks, and weeks [...] This is a rescue mission you are on, to save lives. [...] You are living a moment in history that will change and forge character"
March 26 (GMT)
  • 17224 new cases and 268 new deaths in the United States
    (1 previously reported Covid-19 death in Hawaii has been retracted)

    New York State Gov. Cuomo press briefing
    :

    - COVID-19 patients average time on ventilator: 11 - 21 days (vs. 3 - 4 days for non-COVID-19 patients). "We have patients that have been 20 days 30 days on a ventilator. The longer you are on a ventilator, the more likely you are not going get off a ventilator"

    - New York is testing more per capita than South Korea
March 25 (GMT)
March 24 (GMT)
  • 11075 new cases and 225 new deaths in the United States. New York Governor Cuomo says: [live streaming]

    • Peak number of cases is still 2 to 3 weeks away in New York
    • "We've procured about 7,000 ventilators. We need, as a minimum, other 30,000 ventilators. This is a critical and desperate need for ventilators [..] We need them in 14 days. Fema is sending 400 ventilators only. Federal action is needed to address this now through the Federal Defense Production Act"
    • "The numbers are higher in New York because it started here first, it has a lot of international travelers and has high density, but you will see this in cities all across the country, and in suburban communities. Where we are today, you'll be in 4 weeks or 6 weeks.
    • Probably "hundreds of thousands of people" have already had Covid-19, didn't know they had it, and recovered. Should be tested for antibodies so they could go back to work and keep the economy going
March 23 (GMT)
revisiting this site now that it's format is updated
posted for fair use
 

AlaskaSue

North to the Future
Thank you for the updates jward! Interesting point on stats....Alaska has had two deaths, but one of them was a man who had been in Washington state for some months, contracted the virus there, and then died while still in Washington. I wonder if he was counted for Washington as well as Alaska? Just makes me think there may possibly be overlap if other places do the same; though the numbers are still smallish nation-wide, it's just a thought about the count.
 

jward

passin' thru
Thank you for the updates jward! Interesting point on stats....Alaska has had two deaths, but one of them was a man who had been in Washington state for some months, contracted the virus there, and then died while still in Washington. I wonder if he was counted for Washington as well as Alaska? Just makes me think there may possibly be overlap if other places do the same; though the numbers are still smallish nation-wide, it's just a thought about the count.
Interesting question. I suppose we could drill down easily enough and see whether he was double listed, or not. My initial thought is that they want to minimize, if anything, the # of deceased, thus he would not be. Then, I'd assume we had a national policy of recording standards, whatever they prove to be... but I'm just guessing, really. This *is* my first rodeo, too.

ETA that it occurred to me that we may well have his death listed somewhere in this thread, if you want to poke around and see which aggregator sites I was using in the time frame, then poke around their data, and trace back the death notice whether it's media, or a health dept notice or whatever...
 
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jward

passin' thru
In a matter of days, millions of Americans have been asked to do what might have been unthinkable only a month ago: Don’t go to work, don’t go to school, don’t leave the house at all, unless you have to.

The directives to keep people at home to stunt the spread of the coronavirus began in California, and have quickly been adopted across the country. By Tuesday, more than half the states and the Navajo Nation had told their residents to stay at home as much as possible, with many cities and counties joining in.

This means at least 265 million people in at least 32 states, 80 counties, 17 cities, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico are being urged to stay home.

People can generally still leave their homes for necessities — to go to the grocery store, to go to the doctor and to get fresh air. Still, the changes so fundamentally alter American life that some states, like Texas, have been hesitant to adopt them. In other states, leaders described the decision as agonizing but necessary. “We are at war,” Gov. Mike DeWine of Ohio said.

The result is a patchwork of local and state directives that use a variety of terms, like “shelter in place,” or “safer at home.” The stunning effect is the same: About eight in 10 United States residents are or will soon be under instructions to stay at home.

Here is a guide to how the orders affect each state in the list below.
 
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