FOOD Canned stews (Beef or other)

SouthernBreeze

Has No Life - Lives on TB
First, I must say that I am carrying a 20 year grudge against Campbell’s Soups. It goes back to the time they changed their labels and all their recipes. They watered down everything. I actually wrote to the company complaining (as if that would ever do any good). Prior to that change, their soups were quite good. Tomato Garden was my favorite back then.

Of all the sucky brands currently available, my go to is this one:View attachment 278493
It has a mild spicy flavor. Not as good as the old days, but still worth eating. Some supermarkets in my AO don’t carry all the Campbell’s soup options, however. This and the Spicy Jumbalaya are often the unavailable ones.
Now, that looks good! I'm going grocery shopping, today, and I'm gonna look for some of that. Who knows? Cary and I might like it. At least, we'll try it one time.
 

Bps1691

Veteran Member
Does anyone here have anything to say for or against canned stews, such as Dinty Moore, or Armour Star? I've been looking at them online, but I'd trust the peeps here for realistic reviews. Thanks!

I picked up a can of the Dinty Moore stuff while at the store today. Not brave enough to try it yet.
Had both but liked Dinty Moore better. Over the years the actual amount of beef has declined to where it is more a vegetable stew through. Still some beef but not a lot.

Always keep a couple of cans of it on hand in the winter because it's a quick meal.
 

Coulter

Veteran Member
I watched a youtube video recently and one thing that was mentioned - was that Dinty had recently changed - and not for the better.
 

Old Gray Mare

Has No Life - Lives on TB
Does anyone here have anything to say for or against canned stews, such as Dinty Moore, or Armour Star? I've been looking at them online, but I'd trust the peeps here for realistic reviews. Thanks!

I picked up a can of the Dinty Moore stuff while at the store today. Not brave enough to try it yet.
I made the mistake of storing Dinty Moore in an unheated garage over winter into a very hot summer. The can looked fine and as far as I know it was still in date. I ate it and to say I got sick is an understatement. I don't blame Dinty Moore but am now much more careful how and where I store canned goods. Don't think I've eaten it since.
 

Kathy in FL

TB Fanatic
A good way to "stretch" canned stews and soups - so long as you aren't counting carbs - is to make up a packet of ramen noodles and drain them. If you want to season them only add half the seasoning packet. Then dump in the stew or soup. I can't tell you the number of times we've done this while camping.

To be honest I'm not supposed to any longer because there are enough carbs in a serving of that stuff to cover me for a week or so. LOL But as a comfort food it is grand and really easy to fix.
 

Old Gray Mare

Has No Life - Lives on TB
A good way to "stretch" canned stews and soups - so long as you aren't counting carbs - is to make up a packet of ramen noodles and drain them. If you want to season them only add half the seasoning packet. Then dump in the stew or soup. I can't tell you the number of times we've done this while camping.

To be honest I'm not supposed to any longer because there are enough carbs in a serving of that stuff to cover me for a week or so. LOL But as a comfort food it is grand and really easy to fix.
Dumping them over rice is another option for stretching available food. Mixing creamed soups into cooked noodles and adding available meat and veggies works too. If you have the means to bake it, it becomes a casserole. Topped with cheese or breadcrumbs(add a little grated parmesan cheese and butter or margarine) and you have a filling meal and maybe some leftovers.
 

SouthernBreeze

Has No Life - Lives on TB
Dumping them over rice is another option for stretching available food. Mixing creamed soups into cooked noodles and adding available meat and veggies works too. If you have the means to bake it, it becomes a casserole. Topped with cheese or breadcrumbs(add a little grated parmesan cheese and butter or margarine) and you have a filling meal and maybe some leftovers.
I use Cream of Chicken soup to make different recipes just like what you posted. Sometimes I use with rice. Sometimes I use egg noodles. I like variety.
 

thompson

Certa Bonum Certamen
I use Cream of Chicken soup to make different recipes just like what you posted. Sometimes I use with rice. Sometimes I use egg noodles. I like variety.
So do I. Have always had a big pantry with assorted items. The more options you can give yourself and your family the less likely food fatigue and mealtime malaise will set in. Looking forward to a good meal is something that is really appreciated when every other thing is going straight down the dumper.

For the most part, I'm a scratch cook. And a really good one at that. (Modest, aren't I? :) But it's true.) I pressure can, mostly meats, soup, spaghetti sauce, etc. But I don't turn my nose up at using/storing various convenience foods in order to add variety. Commercially prepared food items have a usefulness. I can get a better variety using a combination of both.
 

SouthernBreeze

Has No Life - Lives on TB
So do I. Have always had a big pantry with assorted items. The more options you can give yourself and your family the less likely food fatigue and mealtime malaise will set in. Looking forward to a good meal is something that is really appreciated when every other thing is going straight down the dumper.

For the most part, I'm a scratch cook. And a really good one at that. (Modest, aren't I? :) But it's true.) I pressure can, mostly meats, soup, spaghetti sauce, etc. But I don't turn my nose up at using/storing various convenience foods in order to add variety. Commercially prepared food items have a usefulness. I can get a better variety using a combination of both.
Exactly!
 

packyderms_wife

Neither here nor there.
I can up cubed beef, he has cans of potatoes from Aldi if he wants them in his bowl of stew, and frozen veggies to make a quick stew. I'm allergic to potatoes so the commercial stuff is out of the question. Having the ingredients canned up separately has worked well for us, then we can make whatever kind of soup or stew we want.
 

packyderms_wife

Neither here nor there.
Dumping them over rice is another option for stretching available food. Mixing creamed soups into cooked noodles and adding available meat and veggies works too. If you have the means to bake it, it becomes a casserole. Topped with cheese or breadcrumbs(add a little grated parmesan cheese and butter or margarine) and you have a filling meal and maybe some leftovers.
Rice, pasta, mashed potatoes, biscuits, texas toast or a slice of thick homemade bread, etc.

ETA heck if you're hungry enough over grits, corn mush, polenta, etc., even plain oatmeal like our ancestors used to eat... aka gruel.
 

anna43

Veteran Member
I don't really care for any brand of canned stew, but Aldi's is as good as any and reasonably priced. Chunky soups are not a favorite of mine either but served over rice one can will feed two or three or in a SHTF situation four. Aldi chunky soups are also as good as name brands. I also like Aldi canned hams as well as name brands.
 

et2

Has No Life - Lives on TB
Does anyone here have anything to say for or against canned stews, such as Dinty Moore, or Armour Star? I've been looking at them online, but I'd trust the peeps here for realistic reviews. Thanks!

I picked up a can of the Dinty Moore stuff while at the store today. Not brave enough to try it yet.
I stock up on Dinty Moore. I like it … for a quick fix
 

jward

passin' thru
I used to find DM to be an ok meal, then they changed something, and I like it less.
I've been known to add salt to it, in contrast to the other posters, but that may have
been due to stressed adrenals and not their formula.

Will try the aldi version, since it got a passable grade here. Thanks.
 

Sacajawea

Veteran Member
Thick soups & stews don't that take long to make from scratch. If you're picking one day a week to cook, you'll have leftovers and I always freeze a couple quarts each batch for those time I'm under the weather (specially chicken soup) or too busy to wait that long to eat.
 

Infoscout

The Dude Abides
One time on a new Scout campout, one of the adult leaders who was in charge of food for the night thought it would be fun for brand new Scouts to fry some fish. Naturally between those with allergies and those who had never had fish before, some of the kids balked. Cans of Dinty Moore saved the day, with copious amounts of pepper!
 

AlfaMan

Has No Life - Lives on TB
I hadn't had any canned stews in forever, got a hankering for some and tried the Dinty Moore a month or so ago. Pretty decent actually, although it appears to have a pretty high salt content.

I liked it; it would make a good prep food (quick to fix, stick to the ribs and tasty). And thanks to those who mentioned the Aldi brand beef stew. We'll have to try that out.
 

Red Baron

Paleo-Conservative
_______________
I hadn't had any canned stews in forever, got a hankering for some and tried the Dinty Moore a month or so ago. Pretty decent actually, although it appears to have a pretty high salt content.

I liked it; it would make a good prep food (quick to fix, stick to the ribs and tasty). And thanks to those who mentioned the Aldi brand beef stew. We'll have to try that out.
For basic home preps, canned foods are the most practical and cost effective solution.

Things like canned spaghetti, mac and beef, beef stew, chunky soup, beans, etc. need no extra water, and can be heated up and eaten right in the can with tea candles, Sterno, etc.

No extra preparation, pots, pans, or plates, that saves on precious water.
 

Blacknarwhal

President-Elect
For basic home preps, canned foods are the most practical and cost effective solution.

Things like canned spaghetti, mac and beef, beef stew, chunky soup, beans, etc. need no extra water, and can be heated up and eaten right in the can with tea candles, Sterno, etc.

No extra preparation, pots, pans, or plates, that saves on precious water.
It's a shame they don't last longer than they do. Most canned goods only have about two years to them, if you believe the best-by dates.
 

Mary Contrary

Veteran Member
Thick soups & stews don't that take long to make from scratch. If you're picking one day a week to cook, you'll have leftovers and I always freeze a couple quarts each batch for those time I'm under the weather (specially chicken soup) or too busy to wait that long to eat.
Can you freeze glass jars?
 

Red Baron

Paleo-Conservative
_______________
It's a shame they don't last longer than they do. Most canned goods only have about two years to them, if you believe the best-by dates.
Tomatoes and acidic fruit are the biggest concerns. Other items will be OK a few years beyond the "best by" date. I'll bring canned goods up to a full boil regardless. That should be fine if the contents look and smell OK. Any doubt, pitch it.

I had a large can of pineapple chunks go nuclear in my pantry after four years or so of storage.

What a mess!
 

thompson

Certa Bonum Certamen
Tomatoes and acidic fruit are the biggest concerns. Other items will be OK a few years beyond the "best by" date. I'll bring canned goods up to a full boil regardless. That should be fine if the contents look and smell OK. Any doubt, pitch it.

I had a large can of pineapple chunks go nuclear in my pantry after four years or so of storage.

What a mess!
You're right, most canned stuff will last lots longer than the stamped date!

Canned sauerkraut is a big NO. Ask me how I know! :strs:

We like the kraut from Aldi the best and it comes in big glass jars. But if I'm making Reuben sandwiches there's a bunch left over if I use the big jar, but not nearly enough to serve with pork roast, etc. So I decided to get one of the smaller cans of kraut (size of a regular can of green beans) and it turned out to be just about the right amount for our Reubens. Somehow a can got pushed way back in the pantry and ... exploded. Learned my lesson, now have a spot just for those cans of kraut so they don't get lost.
 

jward

passin' thru
I don't do the noodles/taters/rice, but find using veggies like broccoli or cauliflower, or even the squashes can stretch and balance a meal...and we should start a separate warning thread of all the canned goods that do NOT last----- sure wish I'd known about tomatoes and pineapples BEFORE my pantry mishaps :whistle:
 

Blacknarwhal

President-Elect
Tomatoes and acidic fruit are the biggest concerns.

I had a large can of pineapple chunks go nuclear in my pantry after four years or so of storage.

What a mess!
Point taken. Interestingly, I can personally attest to the longevity of plain white rice. I actually cooked some from a bag sitting open in the pantry since 2014 as part of a round of shrimp creole. Tasted just fine!
 

Ku Commando

Veteran Member
I picked up a can of the Dinty Moore stuff while at the store today. Not brave enough to try it yet.

Aw, c'mon......big girl like you spent all those years in the military eating that GRUEL......

....just pop the lid & eat it.....a bit salty & no gourmet, but it'll do.

If'n ya don't care for it, well then it becomes dog food.....there, nuttin' goes to waste !!
 

SouthernBreeze

Has No Life - Lives on TB
For basic home preps, canned foods are the most practical and cost effective solution.

Things like canned spaghetti, mac and beef, beef stew, chunky soup, beans, etc. need no extra water, and can be heated up and eaten right in the can with tea candles, Sterno, etc.

No extra preparation, pots, pans, or plates, that saves on precious water.
I agree. Saving on fresh water, in our case, is the main reason I don't store a lot of dry beans. I store canned items that can be cooked in their own stock.
 
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