Planting Any companion planting no no 's?

packyderms_wife

Neither here nor there.

COMPANION PLANTING CHART FOR VEGETABLES
WHY YOU SHOULD USE COMPANION PLANTS IN YOUR GARDEN


By Catherine Boeckmann

February 12, 2019

Vegetables for Companion Planting

Pixabay


Find out which vegetables should and shouldn’t be planted together with our companion planting chart. Our chart covers 10 of the most popular vegetables, including tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers, and more!

HOW DOES COMPANION PLANTING WORK?
Companion planting is the practice of growing certain plants alongside each other in order to reap the benefits of their complementary characteristics, such as their nutrient requirements, growth habits, or pest-repelling abilities.

A classic example of companion planting is the Three Sisters trio—maize, climbing beans, and winter squash—which were commonly planted together by various Native American communities due to the plants’ complementary natures: the corn grows tall, supporting the climbing beans; the squash stays low, shading the area with its big, prickly leaves to discourage weeds and pests; and the fast-growing beans provide a supply of nitrogen.

Growth habit isn’t the only characteristic to consider when companion planting—it’s also important to be aware of the nutrient needs of plants. Growing plants that require the same primary nutrients together means that they will be competing for resources, which can slow down growth for all. For this reason, it’s usually best to grow plants with complementary nutrient needs together.

Finally, companion plants help each other out when it comes to preventing damage from pests. The strong scents of plants like lavender, rosemary, and mint, for example, can discourage grazing animals from snacking on nearby vegetables, and nasturtiums, which are a favorite of aphids, can be used as bait plants to keep the pests off of your main crops.

Read our full article about companion planting to understand all the benefits!

COMPANION PLANTING CHART

Consult the chart below to see which vegetables make the best companions—and which don’t! We’d suggest separating foes and friends on opposite sides of the garden, or at least 4 feet away.

CROP NAMEFRIENDSFOES
BEANSBeets
Broccoli
Cabbage
Carrots
Cauliflower
Celery
Corn
Cucumbers
Eggplant
Peas
Potatoes
Radishes
Squash
Strawberries
Summer savory
Tomatoes
Garlic
Onions
Peppers
Sunflowers
CABBAGEBeans
Celery
Cucumbers
Dill
Kale
Lettuce
Mint
Onions
Potatoes
Sage
Spinach
Thyme
Broccoli
Cauliflower
Strawberries
Tomatoes
CARROTSBeans
Lettuce
Onions
Peas
Radishes
Rosemary
Sage
Tomatoes
Anise
Dill
Parsley
CORNBeans
Cucumbers
Lettuce
Melons
Peas
Potatoes
Squash
Sunflowers
Tomatoes
CUCUMBERSBeans
Cabbage
Cauliflower
Corn
Lettuce
Peas
Radishes
Sunflowers
Aromatic herbs
Melons
Potatoes
LETTUCEAsparagus
Beets
Brussels sprouts
Cabbage
Carrots
Corn
Cucumbers
Eggplant
Onions
Peas
Potatoes
Radishes
Spinach
Strawberries
Sunflowers
Tomatoes
Broccoli
ONIONSBeets
Broccoli
Cabbage
Carrots
Lettuce
Peppers
Potatoes
Spinach
Tomatoes
Beans
Peas
Sage
PEPPERSBasil
Coriander
Onions
Spinach
Tomatoes
Beans
Kohlrabi
RADISHESBasil
Coriander
Onions
Spinach
Tomatoes
Kohlrabi
TOMATOESAsparagus
Basil
Beans
Borage
Carrots
Celery
Dill
Lettuce
Melons
Mint
Onions
Parsley
Peppers
Radishes
Spinach
Thyme
Broccoli
Brussels sprouts
Cabbage
Cauliflower
Corn
Kale
Potatoes

LEARN MORE
Watch our video on Companion Planting: Why Vegetables Need Friends!

Just getting started with gardening or need a refresher course? Check out our Vegetable Gardening for Beginners how-to page.

Need plant-specific growing advice? Read through our many Growing Guides for vegetables, fruit, flowers, and herbs.
Have you tried companion planting? What’s your go-to pairing? Tell us in the comments below!

SOURCE:
This page was first published in 2009 and is updated regularly.
 

lonestar09

Veteran Member
There is a whole slew of info here. If you go to the links you can download pdf files there if they don't show up here. I will probably get some of these printed out and laminated




Collection of Companion Planting Charts, Guides, and PDFs


Collection of Companion Planting Charts, Guides, and PDFs

In Permaculture by Jeremiah CasteloMay 26, 2020

Companion planting is the practice of growing different species of plants together for a mutually beneficial relationship.

Also known as permaculture guilds, certain combinations of plants such as cauliflower, spinach, and peas, seem to thrive off of each other and do well in close proximity. Other combinations such as cabbage and grapes, might prove to be disharmonious and can cause some problems to both plants.

While there are some tried-and-true combinations such as the three sisters (corn, beans, squash) which have been used for generations, there are many other combinations that are being discovered through trial and experimentation.

Because of the myriad of various combinations of companion planting and permaculture guilds, some have organized them into useful charts and guides for easy access.

In this post, we've compiled a list of companion planting charts, guides, and PDFs from various websites. Be sure to visit these sites for more content on permaculture and companion planting.

Read also:

Online Permaculture Design Courses
Where to Buy Seeds Online

Companion Planting Charts

IDEP Foundation

IDEP is a non-profit organization based out of Bali, Indonesia. Their goal is to provide education and training for sustainability and community resilience.

Their website hosts a variety of resources related to permaculture and sustainable living.

This companion planting chart details a wide range of vegetables, their companion counterpart, and their antagonistic counterparts.

Download the PDF version here, or from their website: Organic Gardening and Farming

Green Future

Green Future is a website focused on climate change, renewable energy, and sustainable living. Their companion planting chart provides combinations for many popular vegetables.

View it here: An Encyclopedia Of Companion Planting For The Avid Gardener

Anglian Home

Anglian is a home improvement company in the UK which emphasizes energy efficiency and sustainability. Their blog, Good to Be Home, has a great infographic on vegetable growing and specific section on companion planting.

View it here: A Vegetable Growing Guide Infographic Cheat Sheet

Gaia's Organic Gardens

Gaia's Organic Gardening provides full organic gardening and landscaping services, workshops, and hosts horticulture projects for their local communities.

Their website also features resources and downloadable content for homesteading, gardening, and permaculture design.

Get their free companion planting guide here: Companion Planting Guide - Gaias Organic Gardens

Companion Planting Chart / Afristar

Afristar Foundation

Afristar, an organization based out of South Africa, designs and implements sustainable development programs for the communities.

Their website hosts a variety of resources for permaculture design and other sustainable development methods.

Purchase their companion planting chart here: companion planting | Afristar Foundation

Companion Planting Chart / Windowbox

Windowbox

Windowbox is a company that creates small-space gardening solutions, particularly for window ledges.

They've created a great vegetable companion planting chart which can be found here: GARDEN WISDOM: Companion Planting Chart for Vegetables

Homestead and Chill

Homestead and Chill is a website that provides articles related to homesteading and vegetable gardening.

Find their companion planting chart here: Companion Planting 101 (w/ Garden Companion Planting Chart) ~ Homestead and Chill
More Companion Planting Guides and Resources

Mother Earth News - Companion Planting Guide
Mother Earth News is a website dedicated to providing articles and resources related to homesteading and sustainable living. This companion planting guide features information on how to plant a variety of vegetables and legumes.

Urban Farmer - Companion Planting
Urban Farmer is an online vendor for seeds and plant supplies. This companion planting guide features a visual table and downloadable chart for vegetable companion planting.

Old Farmer's Almanac - Companion Planting Chart
The Old Farmer's Almanac features a wealth of farming and planting information. This post features a simple chart for vegetable companion planting.

Burpee - Companion Planting Guide
Burpee is an online seed vendor which features valuable gardening information. This companion planting guide features a variety of popular vegetables.

Gilmour - Companion Planting Guide
Gilmour is a gardening supply vendor. This companion planting guide features information on how to plant a variety of vegetables, roots, and legumes.
 

dioptase

Contributing Member
I don't have a whole lot of room, so I am currently growing cukes in the same bed as potatoes, but they are over 6 feet apart. Hopefully that will be enough spacing.
 

Wildwood

Senior Member
Tomatoes do not do well if they are close to walnut tree roots...I just learned this a couple months ago. There is a walnut tree near one corner of my garden so I've always been careful what I plant on the closest row since they don't get along with much. The distance from the tree is do-able but the roots are another story. I rotated my tomatoes to that close row last year and it was a disaster.

Also, I figured out the hard way this year that squash and sunflowers aren't crazy about each other either. Instead of a dedicated sunflower row this year, I did small groupings throughout my garden, ending three rows of squash with a sunflower grouping of around three plants. On every row, the squash closest to the sunflowers are puny and pale. This includes acorn, spaghetti and crooked neck yellow squash. I pulled all the offending sunflowers and am waiting to see if the kajari melons in my raised bed that are near three gorgeous sunflower plants start looking bad. They are barely out of the seedling stage and are doing very well but the squash did too until they got to the blooming stage.
 
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