Misc Spring 2021 Sewing and Stitching Chat

kyrsyan

Veteran Member
I am doing repair on my son's favorite shorts. The elastic is dead but the fabric is okay. And with the supply chain kinks, we can't hunt for replacements in the stores. The original version is no longer sold.
So new elastic. An alteration to the drawcords to add elastic to them in the back. And using stretch/elastic thread. The first one is getting hand stitched because my bp is too high for fighting with the serger and sewing machine over unique thread.
Hopefully bp will be handled soon and I can experiment on the machines. (There are 4 or 5 pairs needing the repairs.) After I repair his favorites, I'll do the drawcord alteration on the other pairs in non favorite colors.
 

AlaskaSue

North to the Future
Between gym time and seed-starting, I'm only doing a little sewing right now; cutting out a couple of cute dresses for the grandgirls in Florida. Fun sewing stuff but need to find some kind of shorts to make for the grandboy too. Maybe a dress to match for Mom :)

Just waiting for a good thaw to get back into my conex to see if I can find my MAIN sewing box that was supposed to go into my car when I moved out here - Sigh - my favorite projects, sewing implements, fabrics are in there. They're fine - I just want them! :) Have a completed quilt that I must get out to have quilted, no way can I do that massive thing.
 

packyderms_wife

Neither here nor there.
I'm cutting out a doll pattern body that I drew onto some Pellon 830 pattern tracing fabric. I'll cut out the doll body from some hand dyed fabric tomorrow, and then set up my sewing machine.
 

Faroe

Un-spun
Always been intrigued by making dolls, but never tried one.

Went back to knitting the gansey that got put away for a few months. Very easy pattern, but very tiny stitches. Not fun. Next time, I'll go up two sizes on that yarn, even if I find the fabric a bit loose.
 

Pebbles

Veteran Member
I need a recommendation for a machine that will stitch heavy canvas. I am looking into sewing simple bags made of canvas with rope handles. I am used to just a regular Singer machine that I have had for years. If I do take on this project I want a reliable heavy duty machine for straight line sewing canvas material. TIA!!!!
 

Faroe

Un-spun
I need a recommendation for a machine that will stitch heavy canvas. I am looking into sewing simple bags made of canvas with rope handles. I am used to just a regular Singer machine that I have had for years. If I do take on this project I want a reliable heavy duty machine for straight line sewing canvas material. TIA!!!!
Don't know brands, but I'd be looking for a used industrial machine off e-bay. Might be easiest to pick one up in a large city with a garment district.
 

Pebbles

Veteran Member
Good advice. I might get my sister, who lives in Los Angeles, to see what she can find downtown in the garment district.
 

Martinhouse

Veteran Member
Pebbles, you might look into drapery machines, they are somewhat more "muscular" than a domestic machine. Or a little more heavy duty, one of the older Singer 111W series upholstery machines, if they and repair parts are still around and you don't need anything fancy. I forget the brand name of the 111Ws after a Japanese company bought them from Singer, but they were still good and reliable. The Pfaffs and something called a Juki (?) were mostly pretty awful for reupholstery fabrics of all weights from designer cottons to real leather covers.
 

kyrsyan

Veteran Member
I need a recommendation for a machine that will stitch heavy canvas. I am looking into sewing simple bags made of canvas with rope handles. I am used to just a regular Singer machine that I have had for years. If I do take on this project I want a reliable heavy duty machine for straight line sewing canvas material. TIA!!!!
I have an old Singer 915 that would handle it without blinking. If you don't need fancy, look for one of the old Singer straight stitch machines.
 

packyderms_wife

Neither here nor there.
Pebbles, you might look into drapery machines, they are somewhat more "muscular" than a domestic machine. Or a little more heavy duty, one of the older Singer 111W series upholstery machines, if they and repair parts are still around and you don't need anything fancy. I forget the brand name of the 111Ws after a Japanese company bought them from Singer, but they were still good and reliable. The Pfaffs and something called a Juki (?) were mostly pretty awful for reupholstery fabrics of all weights from designer cottons to real leather covers.
She needs a Juki!
 

AlaskaSue

North to the Future
I was looking at the Juki's earlier this evening. Thank you all for your recommendations, very helpful!!
Love Juki machines - step-mom was really wanting one but is very happy with the Janome she ended up with. She has done an AMAZING amount of quilts on her pre-computer Bernina (still a Rolls Royce as far as I can say, love it) but she wanted something with a bigger throat for the ones she quilts herself. Juki is a nice machine for sure!
 

packyderms_wife

Neither here nor there.
Love Juki machines - step-mom was really wanting one but is very happy with the Janome she ended up with. She has done an AMAZING amount of quilts on her pre-computer Bernina (still a Rolls Royce as far as I can say, love it) but she wanted something with a bigger throat for the ones she quilts herself. Juki is a nice machine for sure!
I have a janome 6500 I adore it’s pushing 20 years of age. I’d love to have a juki in my line up!
 

AlaskaSue

North to the Future
I have a janome 6500 I adore it’s pushing 20 years of age. I’d love to have a juki in my line up!
I received my Janome 6600 as a gift from my sons; it's a love for sewing - I've even repaired and modified heavy duty carhart coats. Last year I got the Janome hand crank machine. A lot of people up here have treadle (I have one of those too) and/or hand cranks for their remote homes, cabins, boats, etc. My new one is a LOT of fun to use! :) But Juki may be in my future as well ~
 

packyderms_wife

Neither here nor there.
I received my Janome 6600 as a gift from my sons; it's a love for sewing - I've even repaired and modified heavy duty carhart coats. Last year I got the Janome hand crank machine. A lot of people up here have treadle (I have one of those too) and/or hand cranks for their remote homes, cabins, boats, etc. My new one is a LOT of fun to use! :) But Juki may be in my future as well ~
You won't regret getting a Juki.
 

ejagno

Veteran Member
Since losing everything in Hurricanes Laura & Delta my crafting (knitting, sewing, serging, quilting, costuming, Cricut and painting) came to an abrupt halt while rebuilding a new home is underway. Yet, I am finding that with limited availability of most things I am lining up projects to sew such as bed skirts, curtains and much more. I have to replace my machines but it will have to wait until the house is built and I have room to put them. Right now we are living in a 5th wheel camper with no room to spare.
 

kyrsyan

Veteran Member
I could use some advice. I'm replacing waistbands for my son. I got the new elastic in. The waistband was actually a bit too small by measurement.
He put them on and they're loose and falling off his butt. Yes, it is a soft elastic but still decently strong.
Help?
 

summerthyme

Administrator
_______________
Do you stretch the elastic while you are sewing? I usually stretch it (the elastic should be at least a couple inches smaller than the fabric at the waist) and sometimes use a zigzag or other stretch stitches... but more often, I sew the wide elastic with 4 rows of stitching. And that *does* stretch the elastic some, so I cut the elastic an inch shorter than I would normally.

Funny... I've never tried this, but I wonder if a walking foot would make things better or worse? If you have one, it would be worth trying a small example as an experiment.

Summerthyme
 

kyrsyan

Veteran Member
Do you stretch the elastic while you are sewing? I usually stretch it (the elastic should be at least a couple inches smaller than the fabric at the waist) and sometimes use a zigzag or other stretch stitches... but more often, I sew the wide elastic with 4 rows of stitching. And that *does* stretch the elastic some, so I cut the elastic an inch shorter than I would normally.

Funny... I've never tried this, but I wonder if a walking foot would make things better or worse? If you have one, it would be worth trying a small example as an experiment.

Summerthyme
I cut it to exact measurement because of past experiences. Because there is a very slight gather, I gently stretched as I sewed so that I didn't have to run a gathering stitch. (I am hand stitching.) Final measure had it being too small. But after past... I had him put them on. They hold up better than in the past but still fell off his butt.
And I have a walking foot. If I can use my feet on a replacement machine, I may test it. I'll have to buy an adapter but first I have to see what machine comes my way.
 

ginnie6

Veteran Member
I need a recommendation for a machine that will stitch heavy canvas. I am looking into sewing simple bags made of canvas with rope handles. I am used to just a regular Singer machine that I have had for years. If I do take on this project I want a reliable heavy duty machine for straight line sewing canvas material. TIA!!!!
Look into a Davis NVF treadle. Seriously if it will fit under the needle it will sew it. its made a little different than most machines as it’s a built in walking foot. My daughter is going to use mine to sew new covers for their boat seats. We tried every machine I have and that’s the only one that will handle the fabric. You can also use it for regular sewing though.
 

Millwright

Knuckle Dragger
_______________
Before you buy a machine, do a search for "(name of machine) forums".

Gobs of discussion will pop up in different forums, sometimes there are forums for specific brands.

You will pick up on things like, Model XYZ uses metal gears and Model XYZ-12 uses plastic gears.


This really applies to everything from sewing machines to boat motors. If there are systemic problems, somebody has found them and will discuss on the interwebz.

For heavier machines, look in other disciplines like leather, upholstery and maybe sail making.

Some good insight here....


 
Last edited:

kyrsyan

Veteran Member
You might go look on Shopgoodwill.com for machines. There were two Juki listed.
I double checked measurements. Even with the odd way he wears them, they shouldn't have been loose.
So I'm debating a technique I used to use on long skirts and wanted input. Basically instead of 1.5" elastic, I'd use two 3/4" pieces with a small gap between them for the drawcord. I've never done the drawcord gap before but I've used double elastic on many floor length skirts to keep everything snug.
 

Donna_in_OK

Senior Member
It is time that I utilize some of the fabric I purchased for my 'retirement'. I'm planning on a new wardrobe, or the start of one anyway, for this spring. I've been looking at all of my patterns trying to determine what I want to use. All will be more relaxed, as I don't need (or want) the corporate attire going forward. Knits have never been my thing in sewing, but I have purchased a few yards recently to play with. I have tons of linens, silks, cottons, and rayon to play with to assemble my new relaxed style. I also do a LOT of machine embroidery, so may incorporate that into a few select pieces. I plan on doing some machine embroidered home decor items as well.
 

kyrsyan

Veteran Member
I've been working on bags to hold freezer items. I'm stitching one by hand right now. I didn't like the number of seams needed from the original pattern I made, so I sat down and created a new one piece pattern. It has about half the seams and I can use it to create a new pattern when I got to make the bags for the other freezer.

Both my machines are at the repair shop. Fingers crossed, I will have them both back within 2 weeks.

And then today, I'd had it with my cpap mask moving all over the place. I had the materials. So I just finished making a new head strap that is sized for me. I've had it with buying ones that are too big and cost too much. I had a neoprene wrap from the thrift store that is too small for me to use as intended. I grabbed the dead head strap, used it as a pattern guide, and made a new one out of the neoprene wrap. I may go ahead and do a whip stitch around the outer edge but otherwise it is done. I already fitted it and put it on the mask. Fingers crossed for a good night of sleep. (And enough of the wrap left that I can make another all in one head strap. And probably at least one stitched together head strap, if not two.)
 

Martinhouse

Veteran Member
Kyrsyan, I love hearing about it when someone makes something they need o ut of some ol' thing tht's been lying around just waiting to be needed! And so many times, what's been made is better than anything one could buy!
 

kyrsyan

Veteran Member
Kyrsyan, I love hearing about it when someone makes something they need o ut of some ol' thing tht's been lying around just waiting to be needed! And so many times, what's been made is better than anything one could buy!
I have a fondness for making new things out of old things. Someone is supposed to be bringing 3 dresses. The current plans are to take them and make at least once comfortable almost full circle skirt. Maybe with a ruffled peasant blouse but definitely with either an added waist section or a "ruffle" bottom tier to make them the length that I prefer my skirts to be.
And since I don't have anyone to help me mark hems anymore, I'm about to give in and buy the Dritz hem marker. I have two skirts that I want to wear and are only lacking the bottom hems.

And I've got a pile of 12" squares from t-shirts that are waiting to be made into comfy work skirts. But I'd really rather do that with a machine. I've done a floor length skirt that style before, by hand, and it takes a long time.
 

Martinhouse

Veteran Member
I've made four fleece blankets all sewed by hand. They are all 60" wide and 2 1/2 yards long. I pin them completely on the floor, which is helpfully covered in 12" tiles, and I use a lot of the huge safety pins instead to sewing pins and T-pins, as so many work loose when I'm handlong such large piece across my lap. I whip stitch around the entire thing, but also follow about a foot behind that seam with a back-stitched top stitching about half an inch from the edge. Both seams are nice and stretchy and there's no problem with threads snapping at any time. I tie the front and back layers together with matching embroidery thread, all ties about a foot apart. Naturally, I like plaid the best.....it's so easy to do without any measuring, but I've chosen patterns I really like and they have all been a pleasure to work with.

Hand sewing is as pleasant to do as knitting or embroidery, and even mending when I have streaming audio to listen to, but unfortunately, I don't find too many things I'm interested in that aren't mainly video.

I could probably find some old streaming audio archives that I'd like, but I'm too cheap to subscribe to things like that. I wonder if my tiny little small-town library rents audio books? What I'd really like would be something that would scan and then read aloud actual books. I"m sure there is such a thing made for blind or visually impaired people, but it's likely lots more expensive than subscribing to those archives I mentioned above.

Oh, well. Sometimes my own thoughts are sufficient to work by. I can think about all sorts of things when there's no outside intrusions.
 
Last edited:
Top