FOOD Report food & grocery shortages / price increases here: 2022 Edition

TxGal

Day by day
I did an Aldi's run and a HEB run today. Aldi's had some holes, but prices seem to be holding pretty well. There were a few flats of canned potatoes and canned green beans, no canned carrots, plenty of canned tomatoes. Didn't see any of their canned ravioli (like Chey Boyardees, but less expensive). Fresh potatoes didn't look great. This was an early morning stop, pretty much my usual time, but this was the first time I saw a lady with two full carts, stuffed to the top. She pretty much has items across the board, fresh meat, fresh vegetables, canned foods, etc.

HEB was well-stocked, prices are up but at least things are available. Produce was looking pretty good.

I made an unexpected stop at WalMart, a place I try to avoid. I needed some plastic containers for the pantry, so had to go. Early in the morning it isn't too bad, thankfully. Prices were decent, most things are really well-stocked. If anyone needs clothes, household goods, etc, they are packed full. Some low areas in the grocery section, and prices were on a par with HEB for the most part. I did pick up some organic potatoes while there. While I have seed potatoes on order, until they arrive I'm not counting on them. Generally I've had good luck growing potatoes from organic store potatoes, so it will be worth the higher price it if works again this year.
 

WalknTrot

Veteran Member
My Safeway here had their usual octopus in the seafood display. I give it the evil eye cause it's so gross looking. Over a weeks time the thing becomes a shadow of it's former self as the legs get hacked off and sold. I don't care how hungry I might be, but I am NOT eating something with suckers on it's legs. Yeesh!
Not to mention that poor octopus has a higher IQ and better social skills than the average Democrat.
 

bluelady

Veteran Member
What the hell does one do with chicken feet? :ecrz:
My Safeway here had their usual octopus in the seafood display. I give it the evil eye cause it's so gross looking. Over a weeks time the thing becomes a shadow of it's former self as the legs get hacked off and sold. I don't care how hungry I might be, but I am NOT eating something with suckers on it's legs. Yeesh!
Chicken feet are to add collagen to bone broth. You take them out & throw the away after. :)
 

tnphil

Don't screw with an engineer
One thing I just realized I was doing (odd that it took this long) was eating frozen entrees almost exclusively. They’re balanced little meals of just about the right size, but they’ve all gone up about a dollar in price EACH. I was on autopilot WRT getting them. But I just got some hamburger and tuna, and a few of the “helper” boxed meals. Lots more food for less money. I’m kicking myself for not realizing it sooner.
Perhaps the ease of such can justify the economics for a single person, but you're paying a lot for the convenience for either. Not busting your chops at all, but the most basic stuff that requires real "cooking" is the most economical. Based upon circumstances, of course. Wasted food is not economical.
I catch pork loins at Kroger for $1.49/lb. A $10(ish) loin will feed two of us for three meals. Add veggies, etc, and it works out to about $4-5 bucks for a meal for two. I just picked up two pork butts last Sunday for $0.99/lb, cooked and pulled it for two fully-packed gallon bags of pulled pork, one for the freezer.
Next time Kroger has pork loins at $1.49, I'm buying 5-6 for pressure canning.
 

tnphil

Don't screw with an engineer
Perhaps the ease of such can justify the economics for a single person, but you're paying a lot for the convenience for either. Not busting your chops at all, but the most basic stuff that requires real "cooking" is the most economical. Based upon circumstances, of course. Wasted food is not economical.
I catch pork loins at Kroger for $1.49/lb. A $10(ish) loin will feed two of us for three meals. Add veggies, etc, and it works out to about $4-5 bucks for a meal for two. I just picked up two pork butts last Sunday for $0.99/lb, cooked and pulled it for two fully-packed gallon bags of pulled pork, one for the freezer.
Next time Kroger has pork loins at $1.49, I'm buying 5-6 for pressure canning.
That $10 (on sale) pork loin could feed one for 6+ meals. Admittedly, one needs creativity to avoid burnout. My wife gets sick of pork and chicken, but because of gout I must limit red meat.

But I'm creative. Lol. I take about 3-4 half-inch slices of pork loin, put in pressure cooker with chili powder, cumin, salt and garlic and pressure cook about 40 minutes. Best shredded-pork tacos you ever had! Pour off some liquid, but shred in the pressure cooker with a bit of the broth. She gets really tired of pork, but she's always completely on board for shredded-pork tacos. In addition, pork fajitas, pork-fried rice, pork and veggie soup, etc. Bone-in chicken thighs are also very economical, roasted 45 min in oven they are pull-apart tender. Try BBQ sauce, jalapeño salt, or curry powder as seasonings.
 

closet squirrel

Veteran Member
Was at the deli counter, looking for my half pound of sliced meat. Most deli meat is now FIFTEEN DOLLARS A POUND, up from $10 a few months ago. Who can afford that?

I don’t know if you have an Aldi but they have a brand of lunchmeat (castle wood I think is the brand) it comes in a 1 pound package and lasts longer before going slimy than any other lunchmeat I have found. It is right around $6 a pound. The uncured ham and smoked turkey is good.
 

tnphil

Don't screw with an engineer
If it lasts longer before going "slimy", I'm gonna question what's in it that others don't add. I probably don't want it.

The "major" brands available in most stores at least have some modicum of reputation to keep up. I don't generally shop Aldi for that reason. TINSTAAFL, you get what you pay for.
 
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tnphil

Don't screw with an engineer
If it lasts longer before going "slimy", I'm gonna question what's in it that others don't add. I probably don't want it.

The "major" brands available in most stores at least have some modicum of reputation to keep up. I don't generally shop Aldi for that reason. TINSTAAFL, you get what you pay for.
Bottom line: unless/until you are willing and able to cook your own food, from raw ingredients, you will never be assured nor control what's in it. Even if you do/can, you'd better research as much as you can, to be certain of sources.
 

hd5574

Veteran Member
Grabbed a large pork loin on sale at Food Lion.. Monday evening... canned half it today ..hot pack....then vacuum seal the other half..will can in a day or so it works. out...to about $2.00 per pint jar..we will most likely get two meals per jar since just the 2 of us.. depending on what we make with it.... .just super tired because we had a thunder storm..in the middle of the night last night..

Central Virginia
 

ainitfunny

Saved, to glorify God.
Seeing slim pickens of half-n-half.

Price has spiked on what there is.

No half gallons at wallyworld...for awhile. (or at least when I drink enough to go brave it)
I probably got the last of it at my Wally world. 4 half gallons of ULTRA PASTEURIZED. Will last me 6 weeks or more. I cant drink "creamer" of any type it pegs my blood sugar, even sugarless, and dry creamer.
 

Marseydoats

Veteran Member
If it lasts longer before going "slimy", I'm gonna question what's in it that others don't add. I probably don't want it.

The "major" brands available in most stores at least have some modicum of reputation to keep up. I don't generally shop Aldi for that reason. TINSTAAFL, you get what you pay for.

The Aldi store brands are as good as, or far superior to most so called name brands.
Their Moser Roth chocolates are wonderful. The specialty chocolates they have at Christmas are great, though last year they priced them out of my budget.
We prefer their bacon and chicken breasts over name brands. I buy all my cheese there. Their goat cheese is usually $1 a package cheaper than WM's, and their yogurt is much better.
The only things I've ever gotten there that I didn't care for were their luncheon meat (dh and the dog thought it was great) and some orange-mango punch that dh wanted that just tasted odd. In over 20 years of shopping there, that's pretty good.
For years, my Aunt shopped at Harris Teeter, which is a really high priced specialty store. She paid over $4 a jar for small bottles of jam and preserves. Mom kept telling her to go to Aldi, but she wouldn't. So one year Mom gave her a jar of Aldi strawberry preserves in a gift basket. My Aunt called her raving about how good they were, where did she get them, and she knew they must cost $6 or more a jar since they were so good. Mom told her .89 at Aldi...
 

inskanoot

Veteran Member
I just realized that broth and stock are two different things. According to this, stock is more nutrient dense than broth.

Which is healthier broth or stock?

"Both broth and stock provide a great variety of nutrients, however stock is generally more nutrient-dense because it has more carbohydrates, fat, protein, and vitamins/minerals," says Rumsey.Sep 12, 2019

Stock vs Broth: Nutritionists Explain Difference, Health Benefits

Stock vs. Broth: Nutritionists Explain The Difference In Nutrients And Health Benefits​

Jennifer Nied
Jennifer Nied is the fitness editor at Women’s Health and has more than 10 years of experience in health and wellness journalism. She’s always out exploring—sweat-testing workouts and gear, hiking, snowboarding, running, and more—with her husband, daughter, and dog.
Your cartons of stock and broth probably aren't the, shall we say, sexiest thing in your kitchen. In fact, they're probably shoved on a high shelf in your pantry or in the back of your fridge. But although they seldom receive centerpiece treatment, these flavorful liquids are indispensable in the kitchen.

But if you're anything like me, you've probably wondered: Are stock and broth actually healthy (what about all that sodium?!)? Also...are they totally interchangeable or not (because they look and smell exactly the same)?

Keri Gans, RDN, author of The Small Change Diet, and Alissa Rumsey, RD, dietitian and the owner of Alissa Rumsey Nutrition and Wellness take stock of the nutrients.

What's the difference between broth and stock?
Though the terms stock and broth are often used interchangeably, the two are not actually synonymous. "Stock is made from bones and is thicker, due to the collagen protein that seeps out of the bones during cooking," says Rumsey. Broth, on the other hand, "is made from just meat and/or vegetables and is thinner." The key difference: Stock equals bones. Broth equals no bones.


Wait, what is broth exactly? I need more information.​

Broth is the thinner of the two liquids because it doesn't contain that thick collagen protein that comes from the bones used to make stock. However, it can still pack in the nutrients!

"It depends on what you add to the broth," says Rumsey. "Different ingredients provide different nutrients. For example, vegetable broth may contain a larger variety of vitamins, but not much protein." You'll need meat broth (or true stock) for that.

Here's the nutrition info for one cup of chicken broth, per the USDA Nutrient Database:

  • 14 calories
  • 0 g protein
  • 1 g fat
  • 1 g carbohydrates
  • 0 g fiber
  • 1 g sugar
  • 900 mg sodium
  • 100 IU vitamin A
  • 5 mg potassium

What is stock? I need more info on that, too.​

Stock soaks up the vitamins, minerals, and collagen protein found in bones during its long cooking process.

The longer stock is cooked, the more collagen and bone marrow release from the bones—and the more nutrient-dense it becomes.

The exact vitamins and minerals found in stock, like calcium and vitamin D, vary based on the ingredients used to make it. "Different ingredients provide different nutrients," reminds Rumsey. "You can add more vegetables and herbs to stock to increase its vitamin and mineral content."

Here's the nutrition info for one cup of chicken stock, per the USDA Nutrient Database:

  • 29 calories
  • 3 g protein
  • 0.5 g fat
  • 2 g carbohydrates
  • 2 g sugar
  • 600 mg sodium
  • 12 mg vitamin C
  • 101 mg potassium

Okay, so, stock vs. broth: Which is healthier?​

Generally, stock and broth are pretty neck and neck. Rumsey, though, gives stock a slight edge on the health front. "Both broth and stock provide a great variety of nutrients, however stock is generally more nutrient-dense because it has more carbohydrates, fat, protein, and vitamins/minerals," says Rumsey. "Stock also does have a higher concentration of nutrients and also contains collagen, which is beneficial for the immune system."

Fans of stock will often claim it does everything from erase wrinkles to ease GI problems, but "all the health claims are not backed by scientific research," says Gans.

That doesn't mean stock or broth are bad by any means. "Both broth and stock provide a great variety of nutrients that support your cells and digestive system," says Rumsey.

Just watch out for high sodium content—especially if the rest of your diet includes higher-sodium foods. "I would look for brands with less than 150 milligrams per serving," says Gans.

Need more oomph out of a low-sodium option? "You could always buy lower-sodium stocks and broths and adjust to you liking at home if you want more salt."


Cool. So can I use stock and broth interchangeably?

Don't worry too much if a recipe calls for stock and you only have broth, or vice versa.

“Generally, stock and broth can be used interchangeably," says Rumsey. "There may just be some differences in texture, but otherwise they'll work similarly.” Though broth may not offer quite as much body as stock, it will still definitely get the job done if you're in a pinch. Phew!


Great, now how do I make broth and stock?​

Whether you choose to whip up stock or broth largely depends more on how much time and what ingredients you have on hand. "Stock is made mostly from animal (or fish) bones and maybe some meat, vegetables (onion, celery, and carrots) and water," says Gans. Typically, you don't add herbs and spices—and cook it for 4 to 6 hours.

Chef Mathew Miller, director of banquets for Omni Hotels and formerly of Le Bernardin and Jean-Georges, recommends roasting your bones before cooking them up into stock.

Not only does DIY-ing your own stock help you avoid food waste, but offers your cooking extra flavor and nutrition, too: "The great thing is you can use what people generally throw out—neck, joints, things that have a lot of collagen, oxtail, and short ribs," Miller previously told Women's Health. "The collagen helps to add thickness and makes it more hearty than a thin stock or broth you might buy in the store, and adds depth of flavor, too."

Broth, meanwhile, is made mostly from animal meat, vegetables (onion, celery, carrots), water, and seasoning. Generally, you cook it for 45 minutes to 2 hours.

Though making your own broth or stock is a time commitment of at least a couple hours, it's worth it. "Homemade might have slightly more nutrients than a commercially prepared one," says Gans.

From there, you can use your own DIY broth and stock to make all sorts of delicious homemade soups.

The bottom line: Stock and broth both pack a variety of vitamins and minerals, but stock has slightly more nutrients.
 

xtreme_right

Veteran Member
But I'm creative. Lol. I take about 3-4 half-inch slices of pork loin, put in pressure cooker with chili powder, cumin, salt and garlic and pressure cook about 40 minutes. Best shredded-pork tacos you ever had!
I’m always looking for new ways to use a pork loin. I usually slice a few pieces off, pound thin, coat in breadcrumbs and fry (schnitzel). The rest of the loin I pressure cook like you do above and then shred for either tacos or bbq sandwiches.
Try turning the shredded tacos into carnitas. It changes the texture and tastes completely different. It’s just going an extra step of pan frying the shredded pork in some oil/fat until it gets crispy edges. Most recipes also add orange juice but I don’t usually. You’d think it would overcook it and dry it out but it doesn’t.
 

vessie

Has No Life - Lives on TB
I’m always looking for new ways to use a pork loin. I usually slice a few pieces off, pound thin, coat in breadcrumbs and fry (schnitzel). The rest of the loin I pressure cook like you do above and then shred for either tacos or bbq sandwiches.
Try turning the shredded tacos into carnitas. It changes the texture and tastes completely different. It’s just going an extra step of pan frying the shredded pork in some oil/fat until it gets crispy edges. Most recipes also add orange juice but I don’t usually. You’d think it would overcook it and dry it out but it doesn’t.
I stuff my pork chops with Stove Top Stuffing and then simmer them in just apple juice. V
 

psychgirl

Has No Life - Lives on TB
I’m always looking for new ways to use a pork loin. I usually slice a few pieces off, pound thin, coat in breadcrumbs and fry (schnitzel). The rest of the loin I pressure cook like you do above and then shred for either tacos or bbq sandwiches.
Try turning the shredded tacos into carnitas. It changes the texture and tastes completely different. It’s just going an extra step of pan frying the shredded pork in some oil/fat until it gets crispy edges. Most recipes also add orange juice but I don’t usually. You’d think it would overcook it and dry it out but it doesn’t.
I JUST recently saw a cooking show where the chef prepared the pork this way.

It looked very delicious but I didn’t know taste and texture would be so different.
Thank you for the input!

I wanna try!
 

vessie

Has No Life - Lives on TB
I just realized that broth and stock are two different things. According to this, stock is more nutrient dense than broth.

Which is healthier broth or stock?

"Both broth and stock provide a great variety of nutrients, however stock is generally more nutrient-dense because it has more carbohydrates, fat, protein, and vitamins/minerals," says Rumsey.Sep 12, 2019

Stock vs Broth: Nutritionists Explain Difference, Health Benefits

Stock vs. Broth: Nutritionists Explain The Difference In Nutrients And Health Benefits​

Jennifer Nied
Jennifer Nied is the fitness editor at Women’s Health and has more than 10 years of experience in health and wellness journalism. She’s always out exploring—sweat-testing workouts and gear, hiking, snowboarding, running, and more—with her husband, daughter, and dog.
Your cartons of stock and broth probably aren't the, shall we say, sexiest thing in your kitchen. In fact, they're probably shoved on a high shelf in your pantry or in the back of your fridge. But although they seldom receive centerpiece treatment, these flavorful liquids are indispensable in the kitchen.

But if you're anything like me, you've probably wondered: Are stock and broth actually healthy (what about all that sodium?!)? Also...are they totally interchangeable or not (because they look and smell exactly the same)?

Keri Gans, RDN, author of The Small Change Diet, and Alissa Rumsey, RD, dietitian and the owner of Alissa Rumsey Nutrition and Wellness take stock of the nutrients.

What's the difference between broth and stock?
Though the terms stock and broth are often used interchangeably, the two are not actually synonymous. "Stock is made from bones and is thicker, due to the collagen protein that seeps out of the bones during cooking," says Rumsey. Broth, on the other hand, "is made from just meat and/or vegetables and is thinner." The key difference: Stock equals bones. Broth equals no bones.


Wait, what is broth exactly? I need more information.​

Broth is the thinner of the two liquids because it doesn't contain that thick collagen protein that comes from the bones used to make stock. However, it can still pack in the nutrients!

"It depends on what you add to the broth," says Rumsey. "Different ingredients provide different nutrients. For example, vegetable broth may contain a larger variety of vitamins, but not much protein." You'll need meat broth (or true stock) for that.

Here's the nutrition info for one cup of chicken broth, per the USDA Nutrient Database:

  • 14 calories
  • 0 g protein
  • 1 g fat
  • 1 g carbohydrates
  • 0 g fiber
  • 1 g sugar
  • 900 mg sodium
  • 100 IU vitamin A
  • 5 mg potassium

What is stock? I need more info on that, too.​

Stock soaks up the vitamins, minerals, and collagen protein found in bones during its long cooking process.

The longer stock is cooked, the more collagen and bone marrow release from the bones—and the more nutrient-dense it becomes.

The exact vitamins and minerals found in stock, like calcium and vitamin D, vary based on the ingredients used to make it. "Different ingredients provide different nutrients," reminds Rumsey. "You can add more vegetables and herbs to stock to increase its vitamin and mineral content."

Here's the nutrition info for one cup of chicken stock, per the USDA Nutrient Database:

  • 29 calories
  • 3 g protein
  • 0.5 g fat
  • 2 g carbohydrates
  • 2 g sugar
  • 600 mg sodium
  • 12 mg vitamin C
  • 101 mg potassium

Okay, so, stock vs. broth: Which is healthier?​

Generally, stock and broth are pretty neck and neck. Rumsey, though, gives stock a slight edge on the health front. "Both broth and stock provide a great variety of nutrients, however stock is generally more nutrient-dense because it has more carbohydrates, fat, protein, and vitamins/minerals," says Rumsey. "Stock also does have a higher concentration of nutrients and also contains collagen, which is beneficial for the immune system."

Fans of stock will often claim it does everything from erase wrinkles to ease GI problems, but "all the health claims are not backed by scientific research," says Gans.

That doesn't mean stock or broth are bad by any means. "Both broth and stock provide a great variety of nutrients that support your cells and digestive system," says Rumsey.

Just watch out for high sodium content—especially if the rest of your diet includes higher-sodium foods. "I would look for brands with less than 150 milligrams per serving," says Gans.

Need more oomph out of a low-sodium option? "You could always buy lower-sodium stocks and broths and adjust to you liking at home if you want more salt."


Cool. So can I use stock and broth interchangeably?

Don't worry too much if a recipe calls for stock and you only have broth, or vice versa.

“Generally, stock and broth can be used interchangeably," says Rumsey. "There may just be some differences in texture, but otherwise they'll work similarly.” Though broth may not offer quite as much body as stock, it will still definitely get the job done if you're in a pinch. Phew!


Great, now how do I make broth and stock?​

Whether you choose to whip up stock or broth largely depends more on how much time and what ingredients you have on hand. "Stock is made mostly from animal (or fish) bones and maybe some meat, vegetables (onion, celery, and carrots) and water," says Gans. Typically, you don't add herbs and spices—and cook it for 4 to 6 hours.

Chef Mathew Miller, director of banquets for Omni Hotels and formerly of Le Bernardin and Jean-Georges, recommends roasting your bones before cooking them up into stock.

Not only does DIY-ing your own stock help you avoid food waste, but offers your cooking extra flavor and nutrition, too: "The great thing is you can use what people generally throw out—neck, joints, things that have a lot of collagen, oxtail, and short ribs," Miller previously told Women's Health. "The collagen helps to add thickness and makes it more hearty than a thin stock or broth you might buy in the store, and adds depth of flavor, too."

Broth, meanwhile, is made mostly from animal meat, vegetables (onion, celery, carrots), water, and seasoning. Generally, you cook it for 45 minutes to 2 hours.

Though making your own broth or stock is a time commitment of at least a couple hours, it's worth it. "Homemade might have slightly more nutrients than a commercially prepared one," says Gans.

From there, you can use your own DIY broth and stock to make all sorts of delicious homemade soups.

The bottom line: Stock and broth both pack a variety of vitamins and minerals, but stock has slightly more nutrients.
Every time I buy a roasted chicken at Costco, I pick the meat off and then stick the carcass in a big pot, add onion, carrots, celery and a lot of dried parsley to the water and simmer it for a nice rich stock.

Quick and easy and nothing goes to waste.

So much more tastier than canned broth. V
 

psychgirl

Has No Life - Lives on TB
The Aldi store brands are as good as, or far superior to most so called name brands.
Their Moser Roth chocolates are wonderful. The specialty chocolates they have at Christmas are great, though last year they priced them out of my budget.
We prefer their bacon and chicken breasts over name brands. I buy all my cheese there. Their goat cheese is usually $1 a package cheaper than WM's, and their yogurt is much better.
The only things I've ever gotten there that I didn't care for were their luncheon meat (dh and the dog thought it was great) and some orange-mango punch that dh wanted that just tasted odd. In over 20 years of shopping there, that's pretty good.
For years, my Aunt shopped at Harris Teeter, which is a really high priced specialty store. She paid over $4 a jar for small bottles of jam and preserves. Mom kept telling her to go to Aldi, but she wouldn't. So one year Mom gave her a jar of Aldi strawberry preserves in a gift basket. My Aunt called her raving about how good they were, where did she get them, and she knew they must cost $6 or more a jar since they were so good. Mom told her .89 at Aldi...
I agree
I’ve bought nothing from Aldi that we’ve not liked!

The only area where I’ve not experimented is in their toilet paper and toiletries.
 

SouthernBreeze

Has No Life - Lives on TB
I agree
I’ve bought nothing from Aldi that we’ve not liked!

The only area where I’ve not experimented is in their toilet paper and toiletries.

When I have the opportunity to be in big town, I stop in at Aldi. I haven't bought anything there that we didn't like, either. I just wish it was closer to us, so I could shop there more often. It's the same with Sam's, but at least I can order online and have it shipped to my front door.
 

Bps1691

Veteran Member
I just realized that broth and stock are two different things. According to this, stock is more nutrient dense than broth.

Which is healthier broth or stock?

"Both broth and stock provide a great variety of nutrients, however stock is generally more nutrient-dense because it has more carbohydrates, fat, protein, and vitamins/minerals," says Rumsey.Sep 12, 2019

Stock vs Broth: Nutritionists Explain Difference, Health Benefits

Stock vs. Broth: Nutritionists Explain The Difference In Nutrients And Health Benefits​

Jennifer Nied
Jennifer Nied is the fitness editor at Women’s Health and has more than 10 years of experience in health and wellness journalism. She’s always out exploring—sweat-testing workouts and gear, hiking, snowboarding, running, and more—with her husband, daughter, and dog.
Your cartons of stock and broth probably aren't the, shall we say, sexiest thing in your kitchen. In fact, they're probably shoved on a high shelf in your pantry or in the back of your fridge. But although they seldom receive centerpiece treatment, these flavorful liquids are indispensable in the kitchen.

But if you're anything like me, you've probably wondered: Are stock and broth actually healthy (what about all that sodium?!)? Also...are they totally interchangeable or not (because they look and smell exactly the same)?

Keri Gans, RDN, author of The Small Change Diet, and Alissa Rumsey, RD, dietitian and the owner of Alissa Rumsey Nutrition and Wellness take stock of the nutrients.

What's the difference between broth and stock?
Though the terms stock and broth are often used interchangeably, the two are not actually synonymous. "Stock is made from bones and is thicker, due to the collagen protein that seeps out of the bones during cooking," says Rumsey. Broth, on the other hand, "is made from just meat and/or vegetables and is thinner." The key difference: Stock equals bones. Broth equals no bones.


Wait, what is broth exactly? I need more information.​

Broth is the thinner of the two liquids because it doesn't contain that thick collagen protein that comes from the bones used to make stock. However, it can still pack in the nutrients!

"It depends on what you add to the broth," says Rumsey. "Different ingredients provide different nutrients. For example, vegetable broth may contain a larger variety of vitamins, but not much protein." You'll need meat broth (or true stock) for that.

Here's the nutrition info for one cup of chicken broth, per the USDA Nutrient Database:

  • 14 calories
  • 0 g protein
  • 1 g fat
  • 1 g carbohydrates
  • 0 g fiber
  • 1 g sugar
  • 900 mg sodium
  • 100 IU vitamin A
  • 5 mg potassium

What is stock? I need more info on that, too.​

Stock soaks up the vitamins, minerals, and collagen protein found in bones during its long cooking process.

The longer stock is cooked, the more collagen and bone marrow release from the bones—and the more nutrient-dense it becomes.

The exact vitamins and minerals found in stock, like calcium and vitamin D, vary based on the ingredients used to make it. "Different ingredients provide different nutrients," reminds Rumsey. "You can add more vegetables and herbs to stock to increase its vitamin and mineral content."

Here's the nutrition info for one cup of chicken stock, per the USDA Nutrient Database:

  • 29 calories
  • 3 g protein
  • 0.5 g fat
  • 2 g carbohydrates
  • 2 g sugar
  • 600 mg sodium
  • 12 mg vitamin C
  • 101 mg potassium

Okay, so, stock vs. broth: Which is healthier?​

Generally, stock and broth are pretty neck and neck. Rumsey, though, gives stock a slight edge on the health front. "Both broth and stock provide a great variety of nutrients, however stock is generally more nutrient-dense because it has more carbohydrates, fat, protein, and vitamins/minerals," says Rumsey. "Stock also does have a higher concentration of nutrients and also contains collagen, which is beneficial for the immune system."

Fans of stock will often claim it does everything from erase wrinkles to ease GI problems, but "all the health claims are not backed by scientific research," says Gans.

That doesn't mean stock or broth are bad by any means. "Both broth and stock provide a great variety of nutrients that support your cells and digestive system," says Rumsey.

Just watch out for high sodium content—especially if the rest of your diet includes higher-sodium foods. "I would look for brands with less than 150 milligrams per serving," says Gans.

Need more oomph out of a low-sodium option? "You could always buy lower-sodium stocks and broths and adjust to you liking at home if you want more salt."


Cool. So can I use stock and broth interchangeably?

Don't worry too much if a recipe calls for stock and you only have broth, or vice versa.

“Generally, stock and broth can be used interchangeably," says Rumsey. "There may just be some differences in texture, but otherwise they'll work similarly.” Though broth may not offer quite as much body as stock, it will still definitely get the job done if you're in a pinch. Phew!


Great, now how do I make broth and stock?​

Whether you choose to whip up stock or broth largely depends more on how much time and what ingredients you have on hand. "Stock is made mostly from animal (or fish) bones and maybe some meat, vegetables (onion, celery, and carrots) and water," says Gans. Typically, you don't add herbs and spices—and cook it for 4 to 6 hours.

Chef Mathew Miller, director of banquets for Omni Hotels and formerly of Le Bernardin and Jean-Georges, recommends roasting your bones before cooking them up into stock.

Not only does DIY-ing your own stock help you avoid food waste, but offers your cooking extra flavor and nutrition, too: "The great thing is you can use what people generally throw out—neck, joints, things that have a lot of collagen, oxtail, and short ribs," Miller previously told Women's Health. "The collagen helps to add thickness and makes it more hearty than a thin stock or broth you might buy in the store, and adds depth of flavor, too."

Broth, meanwhile, is made mostly from animal meat, vegetables (onion, celery, carrots), water, and seasoning. Generally, you cook it for 45 minutes to 2 hours.

Though making your own broth or stock is a time commitment of at least a couple hours, it's worth it. "Homemade might have slightly more nutrients than a commercially prepared one," says Gans.

From there, you can use your own DIY broth and stock to make all sorts of delicious homemade soups.

The bottom line: Stock and broth both pack a variety of vitamins and minerals, but stock has slightly more nutrients.
For those of us on a very low salt diet best part is if you don't make your own, you can get Beef and Chicken broth and stock, in unsalted versions from multiple vendors. Little higher in price but when don't have time it is handy to have it on hand.
 

vector7

Has No Life - Lives on TB

John Deere Girl

Veteran Member
BREAKING: US Army Recommends Soldiers Apply for Food Stamps

"You're going over to the Middle East, potentially to die, while your wife and kids are home getting put on food stamps because your govt keeps printing so much money”

Also while we have, seemingly, a never ending supply of funds to send to Ukraine (60bln and growing).
RT 3min
View: https://twitter.com/teamdad2018/status/1570091316037488640?s=20&t=am4S7ZlIsI-C683WabMVqw
Unfortunately, this is not new. A lot of the families of active duty enlisted have to use food stamps.
 

prudentwatcher

Veteran Member
I am in Gainesville, Florida, and stopped at one of our three Walmarts today to pick up a couple of things. Didn't go all through the store, but did note they were out of eggs, bottled water (all types), and chicken in the meat counter (I mean completely empty). Thought that was odd, as all three have never been empty at the same time before.

Rest of store stuffed with Halloween crap. Did get some more pint jars.

Didn't go down all the aisles, so didn't check on sugar, flour, oil and the like. OTC meds were down quite a bit as well, but that is nothing new.
 

WalknTrot

Veteran Member
I had a short appointment with the oral surgeon this morning to get some stitches out, so did the errand running before heading for home - Menards, post office and the local regional chain grocery. We are looking at a rainy spell coming up starting tomorrow afternoon. (N MN) Thankfully, the third crop of hay was up, dry and under cover last weekend.

Been building a terrace addition to the south deck with more "settin" space, a second staircase, dog friendly features, and Menards is still in their 11% rebate mode. A few more pieces of green-treat, (argh...2 deck boards and 2 2x8's) came to over $40.00. Thought I'd check out their canned goods section, because 11% off pantry food is nothing to sneeze at, considering the stuff they carry is usually pretty bargain priced to start with. Picked up canned veg, beef roast hash, jars of peanut butter, ketchup, bottled BBQ sauce, that sort of thing. When I stopped at the service counter to grab a few rebate forms from the stack, a nice gentleman asked if I used the rebate receipts, said he didn't, and gave me his to the tune of an additional $10.00 worth to send in. :)

My reason for stopping at the grocery store was because the locally grown new crop of produce is in. Potatoes, onions, bell peppers, cabbage, carrots, etc. Still slow on the squash and pumpkins. It's been a near perfect growing season with rain and heat, but it got a late start, so I think the squash crop will be another week at least.
 
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CapeCMom

Veteran Member
I did my regular shopping this morning. Big empty holes on every aisle. I guess now that all the rich people have left for the season they are going to not stock the stores like they were. I only got sale items because prices have gone way up just in the last two weeks. No milk. Of any kind. One of my kids was there on Sunday and said that they had one gallon of milk left and he grabbed it. So in three days they get no deliveries? I also went to grab a quart of heavy cream? $9.87! I put it back. I still have some at home. I stopped at the convenience store on the way home to grab my milk. Usually they are way cheaper than the grocery store. $5.27 per gallon not organic or anything. Sheesh!
 

Buick Electra

TB2K Girls with Guns
Just got home. Had to stop at store (County Market) to pick up a carton of Heavy Whipping Cream. The store had none. Zip. Zero. I asked at the register what was going on. Asst Mnger stated something was going on with Prairie Farms - that they hadn't received heavy whipping cream from them in over a month. I replied that Walmart carries Land O'Lakes as well as Organic Valley and why didn't they just order from them. He said they're in a 'contract' with PF that precludes them from ordering elsewhere.

When I got home I did a search to find out what is going on with Prairie Farms but I could find nothing.

So I hightail it over to the next county, hit Walmart, and all they have left are 12 pints of Land O'Lakes heavy whipping cream. I grabbed 6 as I do a lot of cooking with the heavy cream. And YES!!! YOU CAN FREEZE heavy whipping cream.

So just a heads up for those of you who may use this......grab now while you can!

Cream.JPG

 

skwentnaflyer

Veteran Member
I did my regular shopping this morning. Big empty holes on every aisle. I guess now that all the rich people have left for the season they are going to not stock the stores like they were. I only got sale items because prices have gone way up just in the last two weeks. No milk. Of any kind. One of my kids was there on Sunday and said that they had one gallon of milk left and he grabbed it. So in three days they get no deliveries? I also went to grab a quart of heavy cream? $9.87! I put it back. I still have some at home. I stopped at the convenience store on the way home to grab my milk. Usually they are way cheaper than the grocery store. $5.27 per gallon not organic or anything. Sheesh!
Walmart.com carries a brand of boxed milk called Lala, it tastes very close to fresh. It goes in and out of stock, but maybe worth pursuing.
 

CapeCMom

Veteran Member
Walmart.com carries a brand of boxed milk called Lala, it tastes very close to fresh. It goes in and out of stock, but maybe worth pursuing.
I have six canisters of Nido but don’t want to break into it yet. I may have to if this continues. I may stop by Shaws tomorrow to see what their milk situation is. I know I can freeze milk also but my freezers are full.
 
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