PREP Overlooked Preps

Satanta

Stone Cold Crazy
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My grandfathers, father and even I used to keep an old oil squirt can in our workshops with used oil in it. It was used when you needed a lubricate for bolts and such.

We also used an old car tire as the base when we did brush fire once a year when we trimmed grandma's orchard. Also cut sections out of (pre-belted) rubber tires to wire over places on the animal gates and certain areas of fences that the animals would rub against to protect them from end wires and bolts and nuts.

Used old auto tire inner tubes for water proof rubber gaskets (not under pressure).

Heck my grand mother saved all the cotton balls from Beyer Aspirin bottles. she cleaned and re-used aluminum foil.
I am not sure what you meant using a tire asa base..?
 

Bps1691

Veteran Member
I am not sure what you meant using a tire asa base..?
Put the old tire down flat on ground. Fill it with starter sticks and such. Start the fire. As soon as tire catches start piling brush on the tire making a pile. Keep going until all burned.

The tire will keep going for a long time but it stinks and puts off plenty of black smoke.
 

West

Senior nut
This morning I busted the belt buckle putting my belt on. It was a heavy leather belt but it was the type that the cheap metal buckle is sewed on. So I could NOT just slap one of my old silver buckles on.

But I had a good one in stock I bought on sale a few years ago, if I paid $10 be surprised. Anyway just bought another, $30 bucks, grrr..

Might buy another, its a must have for some of us.
 
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Old Gray Mare

Has No Life - Lives on TB
In home fire fighting equipment

First do not take my post as advice. Talk to a professional firefighter! What is appropriate and doable for my situation may not be for yours!

Has anyone mentioned in home fire fighting equipment? For different types of fires there are different types of fire extinguishers. It's not a case of one size fits all. We have one or two in the house and used to carry one in each of the vehicles, have to fix that.

I've also picked up a welding blanket. They're not currently expensive and can be found at most well stocked hardware stores. I figured it would be good for smothering smaller fires. It can serve other purposes as well in a pinch.

Heavy leather welding gloves to protect my hands. They also have protected me from a pissed off cat that didn't want its matted fur shaved off. I figure they along with a Tyvek suit, some duct tape and a bee veil could double if I ever need to a.... expand my career opportunities to beekeeping?

In rural areas most firefighters are volunteers who want to protect their friends, families and communities. In urban areas they tend to be paid professionals who may have less skin in the game. YMMV
 
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Old Gray Mare

Has No Life - Lives on TB
Activated charcoal powder! One of our beef steers was totally off feed. Probably ate something he shouldn't have.

His temp was normal and he wasn't dehydrated, so we dosed him with charcoal... and I realized I'm down to my last cup of a 25# pail. Oops! Gotta order some now!

Summerthyme
A magnet?
 

Old Gray Mare

Has No Life - Lives on TB
This morning I busted the belt buckle putting my belt on. It was a heavy leather belt but it was the type that the cheap metal buckle is sewed on. So I could NOT just slap one of my old silver buckles on.

But I had a good one in stock I bought on sale a few years ago, if I paid $10 be surprised. Anyway just bought another, $30 bucks, grrr..

Might buy another, its a must have for some of us.
Do you have a harness maker in your area?
 

summerthyme

Administrator
_______________
A magnet?
Not in this case... absolutely no signs of hardware (but I did diagnose another member's cow correctly from two thousand miles away after two vets misdiagnosed her as mastitis! LOL!

But that's is also a *very* good thought for anyone who has bovine livestock. We're hoping to butcher these steers this fall (but one keeps growing UP, not OUT. But we normally don't put a magnet down our beef steers- we keps a very clean farm, and handled animals every day, so easily caught the rare case. But this little place was apparently used as a trash heap before DS bought it... bits of glass and metal everywhere. Magnets (last I looked!) are still cheap insurance. I've got a few... wish I'd thought to add a few more when I ordered our fall vaccines!

But charcoal is useful for *every* species!

Summerthyme
 

Teeja

Peaceful Puppy
Can't remember if anyone already posted these (sorry if someone did): Bic Lighters. By the case. Make for great trade goods.
Bic Lighters are okay, but their composite flints go mushy in time and become unusable.

Instead, I buy Djeep lighters. Good for 4,000 lights. Their flints will last for decades and they're very good disposable lighters. Djeeps aren't cheap though, at about $2.00 per lighter. But they're worth it if you're storing for long term. I get the Djeep "classic" lighters - the regular ones have annoying child-proof thingies on them, but the "classic" Djeeps don't.
 

rob0126

Veteran Member
Bic Lighters are okay, but their composite flints go mushy in time and become unusable.

Instead, I buy Djeep lighters. Good for 4,000 lights. Their flints will last for decades and they're very good disposable lighters. Djeeps aren't cheap though, at about $2.00 per lighter. But they're worth it if you're storing for long term. I get the Djeep "classic" lighters - the regular ones have annoying child-proof thingies on them, but the "classic" Djeeps don't.
4000 lights is impressive.
 

Old Gray Mare

Has No Life - Lives on TB
Bic Lighters are okay, but their composite flints go mushy in time and become unusable.

Instead, I buy Djeep lighters. Good for 4,000 lights. Their flints will last for decades and they're very good disposable lighters. Djeeps aren't cheap though, at about $2.00 per lighter. But they're worth it if you're storing for long term. I get the Djeep "classic" lighters - the regular ones have annoying child-proof thingies on them, but the "classic" Djeeps don't.
Zippo. Old school.
 

Teeja

Peaceful Puppy
Zippo. Old school.

Zippos are good. But never had one that could hold fuel for more than a week due to evaporation. Yeah, you can do the inner tube rubber band thing, but even then it only extends the evaporation by another week or so. I've tested it.

Zippos are good for smokers and the like who use it daily, but for extended long term storage where you're not using it daily (and when you absolutely must have a dependable lighter that can store for extended periods), not so good.

I have some Zippos - but bought them generally for TEOTWAWKI when disposable lighters will no longer be available. They are nice, in that they can use a variety of liguid fuels. Until then, I have a pretty large supply of Djeeps.
 
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Old Gray Mare

Has No Life - Lives on TB
Another overlooked prep: Shoes/footwear. During the Great Depression and the rationing that came with it and WWII shoes were harder to come by.

Other things I'm looking to do a little stocking up on is underwear and socks.
 

ainitfunny

Saved, to glorify God.
Another overlooked prep: Shoes/footwear. During the Great Depression and the rationing that came with it and WWII shoes were harder to come by.

Other things I'm looking to do a little stocking up on is underwear and socks.
i bought 14 pairs of socks at the Dollar tree.
I chose carefully and they seem pretty good.
Sometimes you can get T-shirts too.
 

Old Gray Mare

Has No Life - Lives on TB
i bought 14 pairs of socks at the Dollar tree.
I chose carefully and they seem pretty good.
Sometimes you can get T-shirts too.
I used to like to get my T's at craft stores, heavy cotton ones, good price, nice selection of colors and styles. Haven't done that in ages. This thread brought it to mind.
 

CaryC

Veteran Member
Bic Lighters are okay, but their composite flints go mushy in time and become unusable.

Instead, I buy Djeep lighters. Good for 4,000 lights. Their flints will last for decades and they're very good disposable lighters. Djeeps aren't cheap though, at about $2.00 per lighter. But they're worth it if you're storing for long term. I get the Djeep "classic" lighters - the regular ones have annoying child-proof thingies on them, but the "classic" Djeeps don't.
Kewl!

Just as a notation on lighters. The Bic (propane/butane)type lighters are in general are ok, and can work when wet. However wind and starting fires causes problems with burnt fingers. Just saying can still use, and I have, but be careful with fingers.

Zippo type are great for wind and fire starting, but won't work wet.

So it's a take your pick.

While everyone is considering lighters, you also might want to consider kitchen matches, and specifically "strike anywhere" kitchen matches.

Great for fires and for reaching into Hurricane lanterns (no lighter unless on extreme high can do that), and if you'll treat them with like clear finger nail polish will waterproof them.

"Strike on Box" are also good, BUT if the box gets damp, your done. AND if you plan to use as barter, you have to either cut up the box or throw the whole thing in. I have and keep these for starting fires in the wood heater.

"Strike Anywhere" while hard to find (some will say they are outlawed, but you can still find them) and you can carry and barter a few at a time, without the box.

I also have these treated for back up. Cuz like dude, who doesn't want to be like Clint, and reach into your vest pocket and pull out a match and strike it with your thumb, or drag it on your leg, and light your smoke.
 

LoupGarou

Ancient Fuzzball
As far as lighters go, I use these:

and



The butane torch, just pack a bottle of butane or isobutane and you will be good for a long time. It's also great for unfreezing locks and other things, as well as repairs on things that need to be heated or soldered.

For the Arc lighters, just cut up a few feet of wax paper into half inch wide strips (which you can roll back up to store), and when you need to light something quickly that does not want to light by itself, unroll one of the strips and put the strip under the other "stuff" you want to ignite. Others have suggested isopropyl alcohol or lamp oil as an intermediate started, but I have had good results with the wax paper and you can pack a lot and it not weigh much.
 

coloradohermit

Veteran Member
Something I've been very happy with for vacuum sealing dry goods into glass jars is a Pump N Seal manual vacuum sealer.

The Pump-N-Seal® requires no batteries or electricity and easily stores in your kitchen, boat or camper utensil drawer. The Pump-N-Seal® is the only vacuum sealing system that can vacuum seal ordinary zipper-locking bags, check-valve bags, FreshSaverTM bags, FoodSaver® canisters, ordinary glass jars (that you would normally throw away), Ball/Mason canning jars, tin cans, coffee cups, flip-top canisters, wine bottles and more.
1634391166642.png
 

mikeabn

Finally not a lurker!
I haven’t read all the replies so apologize if there are some repeats. Some random things that come to mind include: large safety pins, extra lip balm, super glue, duct tape, eye glass repair kit, work and winter gloves, hair ties, hot pads, fly swatters, aluminum foil, dental floss, extra toothbrushes, dish soap, zip ties, binder clips, extra rope, a couple of sturdy buckets, hand lotion, extra can opener,

Much of this can be purchased at the dollar tree. Get it while you can and while it’s $1.00
A lot of the overlooked categories are day-to-day things like you mentioned.
 

Hfcomms

EN66iq
Haven't read the whole list either but things that you don't replace very often and should have spares for. I added a few metal sink strainer baskets with o-rings and plumbers putty, all kinds of spare fasteners, nails, screws, nuts, bolts, etc. Spare water pump for the cabin and spare water pump in the well house, another set of eyeglasses on order just to name a few. Even mundane things like dish scrubbers, many bottles of dish soap, extra boxes of baggies, tin foil wrap and stuff like that. Lot of things we don't think twice about stopping at the hardware store to pick up which are now all imported.
 

CaryC

Veteran Member
Seeing the items listed in post 262 I happened to think of the P38. Shirley you've got one of those on your key ring.

Which made me think of the Swiss Army knife.

If you've been putting off getting one of those, you might consider now as the time to pull the trigger on it.
 

Papacub

Veteran Member
Tell me about the freaking things.

I've got a couple of metal cans, and they are still good, but the spouts are shot. Cracked and busted. Looked online to just replace the spout and that thing is 20.00. Just the spout.

And on another can the cap and spout were built in together, and cap busted around the threads.

I'm still going to use the metal cans, but the spout is all taped up, just take the cap off, and use a funnel. But the other one is of no use due to not being able to seal it off.

So went to replace it and like 1) expensive for plastic 2) takes an engineer and 3 arms to operate. Don't even think of a metal one.
This is what I bought at Amazon to replace the old broken spouts, can't seem to get a link,
just do a search for EZ-Pour Jerry can Adapter, and just use one of your plastic can spouts, works great.

EZ-POUR Jerry Can Adapter - Update Your Jerry Cans $9.99
 

day late

money? whats that?
In the worst conditions having a fire is a necessity. Starting one can be a problem in bad weather. One thing I recommend to everyone is what we in the south call 'lighter knot'. It is a piece of a pine tree that has died and the sap has solidified inside the tree. It is easy to light and almost impossible to put out, short of drowning it in water. 'Lighter knot' is free, all you have to do is find a dead and fallen pine tree and get to the hard part in the center of the tree. Once you have that you only have to split it into very thin pieces to make it easier to light. AND the thinner the better. Thread sized pieces are quite good, but you can use larger ones. Since it is only wood that it soaked with solidified pine sap it is water proof. You can start a fire with it under almost any conditions.
 

CaryC

Veteran Member
In the worst conditions having a fire is a necessity. Starting one can be a problem in bad weather. One thing I recommend to everyone is what we in the south call 'lighter knot'. It is a piece of a pine tree that has died and the sap has solidified inside the tree. It is easy to light and almost impossible to put out, short of drowning it in water. 'Lighter knot' is free, all you have to do is find a dead and fallen pine tree and get to the hard part in the center of the tree. Once you have that you only have to split it into very thin pieces to make it easier to light. AND the thinner the better. Thread sized pieces are quite good, but you can use larger ones. Since it is only wood that it soaked with solidified pine sap it is water proof. You can start a fire with it under almost any conditions.
We called 'em Pine knots.

For the old homestead and starting a fire in our wood heater we have on hand -

Tinder in the form of dryer lint, and dryer sheets inside a TP tube. Surrounded with kindling in the form of pine cones, which is about as good as a pine knot, and the bits of wood left laying around after splitting, and then some small wood, and then some bigger wood, and then a back stick. The bigger wood and back stick are placed in after the other stuff has made a small bed of coals, or has burned down some.

All of which are kept in baskets in the house, in the dry.

One match.

They don't call it building a fire for nothing.

As a side note: if you come up on some pine cones that are closed up, don't bother with them they are damp/wet. If they are open they are dry and can be used to start a fire. Even if partly open don't bother, are still somewhat damp.
 

Old Gray Mare

Has No Life - Lives on TB
In the worst conditions having a fire is a necessity. Starting one can be a problem in bad weather. One thing I recommend to everyone is what we in the south call 'lighter knot'. It is a piece of a pine tree that has died and the sap has solidified inside the tree.
Is that the same thing as fat wood?
 

Laurane

Canadian Loonie
Activated charcoal powder! One of our beef steers was totally off feed. Probably ate something he shouldn't have.

His temp was normal and he wasn't dehydrated, so we dosed him with charcoal... and I realized I'm down to my last cup of a 25# pail. Oops! Gotta order some now!

Summerthyme
wonder if it works for Covid.....LOL
 

jward

passin' thru
In general, I think we're probably better served to walk through our own homes, and life styles, and look around at what we have and what bit or bob it might need in the next six or 12 or 18 months. How many rubber washers on your faucets? How many toilet guts have you got? lightbulbs? heavy duty extension cords? Screws, nails, replacement blades? Talked the man into giving up shaving yet? If not, invest a small fortune in those accouterments. electric tape and basic home repair books, and tools? Have all your units been serviced recently? Buy enough ink, and maybe a replacement mouse and keyboard?

Recall in the first depression conditions were far far different; we didn't have even the poorest of us with basements and closets full of extra shoes and coats and clothes, and every third house a committed knitter or sewer with a stash that would turn a small country green with envy. Ditto extra cooking accouterments etc. We have a literal tun of that stuff laying around idle to the point whole industries and social movements have arisen to deal with the glut of having "much too much".

Food though is a different matter. If a spice seasoning or product is an import for you, then you might as well get to importing it now. Up grading your living conditions is a sound way to invest money sometimes- better insulation make more expensive heat go further? Plans for a grey water system or off grid collection and utilization? Do you know what is medicinal in your forage area? How to cultivate it at home? How many calories women our age need? Children/Infants? Working men?
 

day late

money? whats that?
Is that the same thing as fat wood?
I have heard it called fat pine, so most likely it is the same thing. A few slivers of that in a B.O.B. weigh nothing but can keep you alive, allow you to cook food once the fire is going, keep you warm on a cold night and as mentioned, make it real easy to get the fire started. Even with a magnifying glass, if you get it burning like a coal, burning but no flame, just add dry grass or leaves and when they take off start adding small wood to get your coals and bigger wood after the fire starts to do whatever you need it to do. In the old days archers would use the fire to harden the points of their arrows when they didn't have anything to make a broadhead out of.
 

Quiet Man

Nothing unreal exists
Bulk aspirin, anyone:


P.S. Natural Shellac has been used in pharmaceuticals for many years to create coatings on pills, etc. Natural shellac that is labelled non-toxic is safe for use this way. Put a couple coats on your home-made gel-cap medicines after filling, letting each dry. Will not dissolve until in the gut.
 
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day late

money? whats that?
I know I go on about having a fire, but if you have fire you have everything. You can cook, keep warm, and even ward off animals. In my preps is a flint and steel set. Matches can get wet. Lighters will sooner or later run out of fuel. The flint and steel will work when wet and as long as they are around, they don't run out of fuel.
 

CaryC

Veteran Member
I know I go on about having a fire, but if you have fire you have everything. You can cook, keep warm, and even ward off animals. In my preps is a flint and steel set. Matches can get wet. Lighters will sooner or later run out of fuel. The flint and steel will work when wet and as long as they are around, they don't run out of fuel.
As far as I'm concerned it's all good. I agree with you too. Even though you can do a few things to make things last longer.

It should also be considered that come cool/cold temps making a fire probably won't be an everyday job. Unless you're on the run which I'm to old to do that. The reason, all you'll need to do is stoke up the old fire.

And in the summer, no one wants to hover over a fire, so cold meals (sandwiches) and making an early AM fire to cook breakfast, and supper at the same time will probably be done, and if necessary baking the bread/biscuits. So more starting will be in the offing then.

I would also suggest to anyone who doesn't make a lot of fires, that they do some practicing. It's not as easy as one would think. And while no one wants to go there, because it is so difficult to do, as you run out of material to start a fire and have nothing, remember the last resort - the bow.
 

WalknTrot

Veteran Member
Something I ran into this morning....I'm in the process of restoring a couple more old Rayo (round wick) oil lamps, and figured I'd better also check the replacement parts I have on hand for the Aladdins. Argh..noticed that the mantle on my grandma's Aladdin is splitting.

Recently, I've ordered some bits and bobs from our own Miles Stair for the Rayo's (just google his name and his website comes up...a wonderful resource!) but Aladdin mantles....all I can say is if you need them....good luck finding them in stock. After really digging around, I found some, but they are scarce as hen's teeth right now, and probably not much hope in sight for improvement any time soon.

Also, your Home Depot should have the (odorless) Klean Heat kero substitute in stock because....well...it's kero heater and lamp season. Wouldn't hurt to pick some up, or check your K-1 supply if that's what you use.
 

Hfcomms

EN66iq
....but Aladdin mantles....all I can say is if you need them....good luck finding them in stock. After really digging around, I found some, but they are scarce as hen's teeth right now, and probably not much hope in sight for improvement any time soon.
Lehman's has them but they are a bit pricey though.

 

WalknTrot

Veteran Member
Lehman's has them but they are a bit pricey though.

Back ordered.
 

Old Gray Mare

Has No Life - Lives on TB
So a friend asked me, "Guess what moved into my backyard?". Turns out a bee hive. I offered to help but no beekeeping equipment. Nuts. So I'm improvising:
Tyvek suit
Duck tape
Heavy leather welding gloves
For a bee veil: wide brim hat, screening, duck tape
Pry bar
bread knife
brush with handle
Not sure what I'd do for a smoker.
 
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