OP-ED Lt. Col. (Ret.) Alexander Vindman's WaPo Op-Ed

Bicycle Junkie

Resident dissident and troll

Opinions
Alexander Vindman: Coming forward ended my career. I still believe doing what’s right matters.
Army Lt. Col. Alexander S. Vindman is sworn in before the House Intelligence Committee during an impeachment hearing in November 2019. (Matt McClain/The Washington Post)

Army Lt. Col. Alexander S. Vindman is sworn in before the House Intelligence Committee during an impeachment hearing in November 2019. (Matt McClain/The Washington Post)
Opinion by Alexander S. Vindman
August 1, 2020 at 7:00 a.m. CDT
Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman (Ret.), a career U.S. Army officer, served on the National Security Council as the director for Eastern European, Caucasus and Russian affairs, as the Russia political-military affairs officer for the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and as a military attaché in the U.S. Embassy in Moscow.

After 21 years, six months and 10 days of active military service, I am now a civilian. I made the difficult decision to retire because a campaign of bullying, intimidation and retaliation by President Trump and his allies forever limited the progression of my military career.
This experience has been painful, but I am not alone in this ignominious fate. The circumstances of my departure might have been more public, yet they are little different from those of dozens of other lifelong public servants who have left this administration with their integrity intact but their careers irreparably harmed.


A year ago, having served the nation in uniform in positions of critical importance, I was on the cusp of a career-topping promotion to colonel. A year ago, unknown to me, my concerns over the president’s conduct and the president’s efforts to undermine the very foundations of our democracy were precipitating tremors that would ultimately shake loose the facade of good governance and publicly expose the corruption of the Trump administration.
At no point in my career or life have I felt our nation’s values under greater threat and in more peril than at this moment. Our national government during the past few years has been more reminiscent of the authoritarian regime my family fled more than 40 years ago than the country I have devoted my life to serving.
Our citizens are being subjected to the same kinds of attacks tyrants launch against their critics and political opponents. Those who choose loyalty to American values and allegiance to the Constitution over devotion to a mendacious president and his enablers are punished. The president recklessly downplayed the threat of the pandemic even as it swept through our country. The economic collapse that followed highlighted the growing income disparities in our society. Millions are grieving the loss of loved ones and many more have lost their livelihoods while the president publicly bemoans his approval ratings.


There is another way.
During my testimony in the House impeachment inquiry, I reassured my father, who experienced Soviet authoritarianism firsthand, saying, “Do not worry, I will be fine for telling the truth.” Despite Trump’s retaliation, I stand by that conviction. Even as I experience the low of ending my military career, I have also experienced the loving support of tens of thousands of Americans. Theirs is a chorus of hope that drowns out the spurious attacks of a disreputable man and his sycophants.
Since the struggle for our nation’s independence, America has been a union of purpose: a union born from the belief that although each individual is the pilot of their own destiny, when we come together, we change the world. We are stronger as a woven rope than as unbound threads.

America has thrived because citizens have been willing to contribute their voices and shed their blood to challenge injustice and protect the nation. It is in keeping with that history of service that, at this moment, I feel the burden to advocate for my values and an enormous urgency to act.

Despite some personal turmoil, I remain hopeful for the future for both my family and for our nation. Impeachment exposed Trump’s corruption, but the confluence of a pandemic, a financial crisis and the stoking of societal divisions has roused the soul of the American people. A groundswell is building that will issue a mandate to reject hate and bigotry and a return to the ideals that set the United States apart from the rest of the world. I look forward to contributing to that effort.
In retirement from the Army, I will continue to defend my nation. I will demand accountability of our leadership and call for leaders of moral courage and public servants of integrity. I will speak about the attacks on our national security. I will advocate for policies and strategies that will keep our nation safe and strong against internal and external threats. I will promote public service and exalt the contribution that service brings to all areas of society.

The 23-year-old me who was commissioned in December 1998 could never have imagined the opportunities and experiences I have had. I joined the military to serve the country that sheltered my family’s escape from authoritarianism, and yet the privilege has been all mine.

When I was asked why I had the confidence to tell my father not to worry about my testimony, my response was, “Congressman, because this is America. This is the country I have served and defended, that all my brothers have served, and here, right matters.”
To this day, despite everything that has happened, I continue to believe in the American Dream. I believe that in America, right matters. I want to help ensure that right matters for all Americans.
 

ArisenCarcass

Veteran Member

Opinions
Alexander Vindman: Coming forward ended my career. I still believe doing what’s right matters.
Army Lt. Col. Alexander S. Vindman is sworn in before the House Intelligence Committee during an impeachment hearing in November 2019. (Matt McClain/The Washington Post)

Army Lt. Col. Alexander S. Vindman is sworn in before the House Intelligence Committee during an impeachment hearing in November 2019. (Matt McClain/The Washington Post)
Opinion by Alexander S. Vindman
August 1, 2020 at 7:00 a.m. CDT
Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman (Ret.), a career U.S. Army officer, served on the National Security Council as the director for Eastern European, Caucasus and Russian affairs, as the Russia political-military affairs officer for the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and as a military attaché in the U.S. Embassy in Moscow.

After 21 years, six months and 10 days of active military service, I am now a civilian. I made the difficult decision to retire because a campaign of bullying, intimidation and retaliation by President Trump and his allies forever limited the progression of my military career.
This experience has been painful, but I am not alone in this ignominious fate. The circumstances of my departure might have been more public, yet they are little different from those of dozens of other lifelong public servants who have left this administration with their integrity intact but their careers irreparably harmed.


A year ago, having served the nation in uniform in positions of critical importance, I was on the cusp of a career-topping promotion to colonel. A year ago, unknown to me, my concerns over the president’s conduct and the president’s efforts to undermine the very foundations of our democracy were precipitating tremors that would ultimately shake loose the facade of good governance and publicly expose the corruption of the Trump administration.
At no point in my career or life have I felt our nation’s values under greater threat and in more peril than at this moment. Our national government during the past few years has been more reminiscent of the authoritarian regime my family fled more than 40 years ago than the country I have devoted my life to serving.
Our citizens are being subjected to the same kinds of attacks tyrants launch against their critics and political opponents. Those who choose loyalty to American values and allegiance to the Constitution over devotion to a mendacious president and his enablers are punished. The president recklessly downplayed the threat of the pandemic even as it swept through our country. The economic collapse that followed highlighted the growing income disparities in our society. Millions are grieving the loss of loved ones and many more have lost their livelihoods while the president publicly bemoans his approval ratings.


There is another way.
During my testimony in the House impeachment inquiry, I reassured my father, who experienced Soviet authoritarianism firsthand, saying, “Do not worry, I will be fine for telling the truth.” Despite Trump’s retaliation, I stand by that conviction. Even as I experience the low of ending my military career, I have also experienced the loving support of tens of thousands of Americans. Theirs is a chorus of hope that drowns out the spurious attacks of a disreputable man and his sycophants.
Since the struggle for our nation’s independence, America has been a union of purpose: a union born from the belief that although each individual is the pilot of their own destiny, when we come together, we change the world. We are stronger as a woven rope than as unbound threads.

America has thrived because citizens have been willing to contribute their voices and shed their blood to challenge injustice and protect the nation. It is in keeping with that history of service that, at this moment, I feel the burden to advocate for my values and an enormous urgency to act.

Despite some personal turmoil, I remain hopeful for the future for both my family and for our nation. Impeachment exposed Trump’s corruption, but the confluence of a pandemic, a financial crisis and the stoking of societal divisions has roused the soul of the American people. A groundswell is building that will issue a mandate to reject hate and bigotry and a return to the ideals that set the United States apart from the rest of the world. I look forward to contributing to that effort.
In retirement from the Army, I will continue to defend my nation. I will demand accountability of our leadership and call for leaders of moral courage and public servants of integrity. I will speak about the attacks on our national security. I will advocate for policies and strategies that will keep our nation safe and strong against internal and external threats. I will promote public service and exalt the contribution that service brings to all areas of society.

The 23-year-old me who was commissioned in December 1998 could never have imagined the opportunities and experiences I have had. I joined the military to serve the country that sheltered my family’s escape from authoritarianism, and yet the privilege has been all mine.

When I was asked why I had the confidence to tell my father not to worry about my testimony, my response was, “Congressman, because this is America. This is the country I have served and defended, that all my brothers have served, and here, right matters.”
To this day, despite everything that has happened, I continue to believe in the American Dream. I believe that in America, right matters. I want to help ensure that right matters for all Americans.
**** off, whiny treasonous scum.
May your time as a civilian be short and end in a noose.
 

Gingergirl

Veteran Member
He retired because he had been passed over for promotion in the past two years. It is "move up (promote) or move out (leave the service.) Third time passed over, you are out. He was coming up for that third review this Sept.

The two failures to be promoted occurred before his dust up with administration.

IMHO, Vindman was "jumping the shark" hoping that jumping into current politics would save his career. The Fool thought that the Dems would circle around him and see to it he was promoted and Save his career.
 

Bicycle Junkie

Resident dissident and troll
**** off, whiny treasonous scum.
May your time as a civilian be short and end in a noose.
"End in a noose" ?? Hanging is not a means of judicial execution in the US anymore. I infer from your comment the use of a "noose" would be an extra-judicial hanging, i.e. a lynching. So just to be clear, you believe those who criticize the government should be lynched?? Kim Jong Un would agree!!
 

Bps1691

Veteran Member
Wonder which demon-crat big bucks supporter will give this treasonous scum a cushy high paying do nothing job?

Or will the demon-crats use their old ploy of getting him onto one of the do-nothing boards and commissions of worthless politicians and the connected, who make big bucks, have a fancy title and do nothing?

He has no financial chops, so that means they can't put him to work in Fanny Mae or such making huge salaries, like they've done for so many other worthless politicians.

This guy violated the chain of command and if he wasn't connected and the military hierarchy wasn't remade into a bunch of pollical hacks, would have been punished.
 

Bps1691

Veteran Member
Are you saying someone who is a whistleblower is a traitor? I suppose you are nostalgic for the good old days (pre-1776) when no one could speak out against the government without fear of repercussions.
Whistleblower ???

You do realize that the best transcript available and all the other witnesses to the call disagreed with the Army flop right? That everything he said was politized and HIS OPINION with no facts to back him up? That he violated the chain of command and never talked to his superior officer about it?

There is significant evidence that this "whistleblower" was involved with the Shifty Shift show that collaborated with the demon-crats to construct their "impeachable offenses" from broad cloth. That my friend is sedition, not whistleblowing.
 

et2

Veteran Member
Then why did this "soldier" violate the chain of command and not discuss it with his superior officers?

Why did he work with the Shifty Shift show and their "whistleblower" who can never be named to supply shifty program outside of channels?
And tried to manipulate documents before testifying. He admitted to it. Such a frigging hero. He should be in prison.
 
Are you saying someone who is a whistleblower is a traitor? I suppose you are nostalgic for the good old days (pre-1776) when no one could speak out against the government without fear of repercussions.

Not at all. I think whistleblowers are often a good thing. Wells Fargo sure could have used some in '08.

My problem is with this traitorous little prick hiding behind a uniform while subverting his chain of command.
 

Double_A

TB Fanatic
He retired because he had been passed over for promotion in the past two years. It is "move up (promote) or move out (leave the service.) Third time passed over, you are out. He was coming up for that third review this Sept.

The two failures to be promoted occurred before his dust up with administration.

IMHO, Vindman was "jumping the shark" hoping that jumping into current politics would save his career. The Fool thought that the Dems would circle around him and see to it he was promoted and Save his career.
Do you have a source for this info? I'd like to learn more, if so this places things under a different light.
 

alfa1

Contributing Member
Trump is a Narcissis and blow hard but.....he’s not a Swamp Creature!
vindman on the other hand is in allegiance with the Swamp and Mossad
poor baby didn’t make O6...being a Button Colonel ain’t the same as a ‘Bird’ Colonel
His next ER was probably already filled out and ready, Not recommended for Promotion at this time........
 

subnet

Boot

Opinions
Alexander Vindman: Coming forward ended my career. I still believe doing what’s right matters.
Army Lt. Col. Alexander S. Vindman is sworn in before the House Intelligence Committee during an impeachment hearing in November 2019. (Matt McClain/The Washington Post)

Army Lt. Col. Alexander S. Vindman is sworn in before the House Intelligence Committee during an impeachment hearing in November 2019. (Matt McClain/The Washington Post)
Opinion by Alexander S. Vindman
August 1, 2020 at 7:00 a.m. CDT
Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman (Ret.), a career U.S. Army officer, served on the National Security Council as the director for Eastern European, Caucasus and Russian affairs, as the Russia political-military affairs officer for the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and as a military attaché in the U.S. Embassy in Moscow.

After 21 years, six months and 10 days of active military service, I am now a civilian. I made the difficult decision to retire because a campaign of bullying, intimidation and retaliation by President Trump and his allies forever limited the progression of my military career.
This experience has been painful, but I am not alone in this ignominious fate. The circumstances of my departure might have been more public, yet they are little different from those of dozens of other lifelong public servants who have left this administration with their integrity intact but their careers irreparably harmed.


A year ago, having served the nation in uniform in positions of critical importance, I was on the cusp of a career-topping promotion to colonel. A year ago, unknown to me, my concerns over the president’s conduct and the president’s efforts to undermine the very foundations of our democracy were precipitating tremors that would ultimately shake loose the facade of good governance and publicly expose the corruption of the Trump administration.
At no point in my career or life have I felt our nation’s values under greater threat and in more peril than at this moment. Our national government during the past few years has been more reminiscent of the authoritarian regime my family fled more than 40 years ago than the country I have devoted my life to serving.
Our citizens are being subjected to the same kinds of attacks tyrants launch against their critics and political opponents. Those who choose loyalty to American values and allegiance to the Constitution over devotion to a mendacious president and his enablers are punished. The president recklessly downplayed the threat of the pandemic even as it swept through our country. The economic collapse that followed highlighted the growing income disparities in our society. Millions are grieving the loss of loved ones and many more have lost their livelihoods while the president publicly bemoans his approval ratings.


There is another way.
During my testimony in the House impeachment inquiry, I reassured my father, who experienced Soviet authoritarianism firsthand, saying, “Do not worry, I will be fine for telling the truth.” Despite Trump’s retaliation, I stand by that conviction. Even as I experience the low of ending my military career, I have also experienced the loving support of tens of thousands of Americans. Theirs is a chorus of hope that drowns out the spurious attacks of a disreputable man and his sycophants.
Since the struggle for our nation’s independence, America has been a union of purpose: a union born from the belief that although each individual is the pilot of their own destiny, when we come together, we change the world. We are stronger as a woven rope than as unbound threads.

America has thrived because citizens have been willing to contribute their voices and shed their blood to challenge injustice and protect the nation. It is in keeping with that history of service that, at this moment, I feel the burden to advocate for my values and an enormous urgency to act.

Despite some personal turmoil, I remain hopeful for the future for both my family and for our nation. Impeachment exposed Trump’s corruption, but the confluence of a pandemic, a financial crisis and the stoking of societal divisions has roused the soul of the American people. A groundswell is building that will issue a mandate to reject hate and bigotry and a return to the ideals that set the United States apart from the rest of the world. I look forward to contributing to that effort.
In retirement from the Army, I will continue to defend my nation. I will demand accountability of our leadership and call for leaders of moral courage and public servants of integrity. I will speak about the attacks on our national security. I will advocate for policies and strategies that will keep our nation safe and strong against internal and external threats. I will promote public service and exalt the contribution that service brings to all areas of society.

The 23-year-old me who was commissioned in December 1998 could never have imagined the opportunities and experiences I have had. I joined the military to serve the country that sheltered my family’s escape from authoritarianism, and yet the privilege has been all mine.

When I was asked why I had the confidence to tell my father not to worry about my testimony, my response was, “Congressman, because this is America. This is the country I have served and defended, that all my brothers have served, and here, right matters.”
To this day, despite everything that has happened, I continue to believe in the American Dream. I believe that in America, right matters. I want to help ensure that right matters for all Americans.
Marxist propaganda and your retorts are nothing but Saul Alynskys rule 4 in play...sell it to the useful idiots.
 

Kathy in FL

Has No Life - Lives on TB
"End in a noose" ?? Hanging is not a means of judicial execution in the US anymore. I infer from your comment the use of a "noose" would be an extra-judicial hanging, i.e. a lynching. So just to be clear, you believe those who criticize the government should be lynched?? Kim Jong Un would agree!!
Geez, have a different opinion but don't make out what you disagree to be something it isn't.

Vindman lied under oath at least three times. He was an officer in the US military. There are consequences for what amounts to treason. Vindman was already a failing officer prior to his participation in a kangaroo action that tried to take down a sitting president of the USofA. His comeuppance is past due.
 

Lone_Hawk

Resident Spook
Despite some personal turmoil, I remain hopeful for the future for both my family and for our nation. Impeachment exposed Trump’s corruption, but the confluence of a pandemic, a financial crisis and the stoking of societal divisions has roused the soul of the American people. A groundswell is building that will issue a mandate to reject hate and bigotry and a return to the ideals that set the United States apart from the rest of the world. I look forward to contributing to that effort.
In retirement from the Army, I will continue to defend my nation. I will demand accountability of our leadership and call for leaders of moral courage and public servants of integrity. I will speak about the attacks on our national security. I will advocate for policies and strategies that will keep our nation safe and strong against internal and external threats. I will promote public service and exalt the contribution that service brings to all areas of society.
So..... based on this statement in his oped he is going to support the Trump administration and speak out on what his Democrap handlers told him to do? Hmmmm?
 

Coulter

Veteran Member
Didn't Bicycle Junkie said - he loves trolling this place?

Recently there was a poster complaining about trolls but some said they wanted hear the other side (as if we don't hear it EVERYWHERE).

I wonder if they are happy now.
 
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Do you have a source for this info? I'd like to learn more, if so this places things under a different light.
You get 3 looks: below the zone, in the zone, above the zone. Not picked up, you're out. If he's out next year, then he's been passed over twice. It's not a bad thing, few make the jump the jump to full colonel, which is a promotion list approved by Congress.
What chaps me, as a current Major in the Army Reserve, is his running his mouth about the current President. If his Congressional testimony hadn't revealed him as an insubordinate disgrace, this letter certainly would. He was open to court-martial before and has made himself open to it again. Higher officers than he is have been getting away with it, so why not?
 
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