1st Aid Is Marijuana an Effective Treatment for Reducing Nausea and Vomiting?

Broccoli

Contributing Member
http://medicalmarijuana.procon.org/view.answers.php?questionID=000137

Cancer Monthly, a cancer treatment website, stated in its May 2006 e-newsletter article "Medical Marijuana - The FDA Loses More Credibility":

"There are literally hundreds of articles that appear in the peer reviewed medical and scientific literature that discuss marijuana's effects in pain relief, control of nausea and vomiting, and appetite stimulation...

Obviously smoking marijuana is not risk-free especially to respiratory organs and tissue.

However, compared to the risks of a typical chemotherapy agent such as cytoxan which includes: urinary bladder, myeloproliferative, or lymphoproliferative malignancies, potential sterility, urinary system hemorrhagic cystitis, hematuria, cardiac toxicity, anaphylactic reactions, significant suppression of immune responses, and sometimes fatal, infections; the risks of marijuana pale in comparison.

And for cancer patients with advanced cancers who want to improve the quality of their life, a risk versus benefit analysis weighs heavily on the benefit side."

May 2006 - Cancer Monthly

Kate Scannell, MD, Co-Director of the Kaiser-Permanente Northern California Ethics Department, wrote the following in the Feb. 16, 2003 article "Mr. Attorney General, Listen to the Doctors" published in the San Francisco Chronicle:

"I knew this woman was dying a prolonged and miserable death. And, from years of clinical experience, I - like many other doctors - also knew that marijuana could actually help her. From working with AIDS and cancer patients, I repeatedly saw how marijuana could ameliorate a patient's debilitating fatigue, restore appetite, diminish pain, remedy nausea, cure vomiting and curtail down-to-the bone weight loss. I could firmly attest to its benefits and wager the likelihood that it would decrease her suffering."

Feb. 16, 2003 - Kate Scannell, MD

Jo Daly, late San Francisco Police Commissioner and lung and colon cancer sufferer, declared on Feb. 14, 1997 in Conant v. McCaffrey :

"A friend then gave me a marijuana cigarette, suggesting that it might help quell my nausea. I took three puffs from the cigarette. One-half hour later, I was calm, my nausea had disappeared, my appetite returned, and I slept that evening.

…My use of medical marijuana had a secondary, though by no means minor benefit: I was able to drastically reduce my dependence on more powerful prescription drugs that I was prescribed for pain and nausea. With the help of medical marijuana, which I ingest only occasionally and in small amounts, I no longer need the Compazine, Lorazepam, Ativan and Halcion. No combination of these medications provided adequate relief. They also caused serious side effects that I never experienced with marijuana."

Feb. 14, 1997 - Jo Daly

Debasish Tripathy, MD, Professor of Medicine at the University of Southern California, declared on Feb. 13, 1997 in Conant v. McCaffrey:

"I have prescribed Marinol to some of my patients and it has proven effective in some cases. However, scientific and anecdotal reports consistently indicate that smoking marijuana is a therapeutically preferable means of ingestion. Marinol is available in pill form only. Moreover, Marinol contains only one of the many ingredients found in marijuana (THC). It may be that the beneficial effects of THC are increased by the cumulative effect of additional substances found in cannabis. That is an area for future research. For whatever reason, smoking appears to result in faster, more effective relief, and dosage levels are more easily titrated and controlled in some patients."

Feb. 13, 1997 - Debasish Tripathy, MD

The Institute of Medicine published the following in its Mar. 1999 report titled "Marijuana and Medicine: Assessing the Science Base":

"Most chemotherapy patients are unlikely to want to use marijuana or THC as an antiemetic. In 1999, there are more effective antiemetic agents available than were available earlier. By comparison, cannabinoids are only modest antiemetics.

However, because modern antiemetics probably act through different mechanisms, cannabinoids might be effective in people who respond poorly to currently used antiemetic drugs, or cannabinoids might be more effective in combination with a new drug than is either alone...

The goal of antiemetic medications is to prevent nausea and vomiting. Hence, antiemetics are typically given before chemotherapy, in which case a pill is an effective form or drug delivery. However, in patients already experiencing severe nausea or vomiting, pills are generally ineffective because of the difficulty in swallowing or keeping a pill down and slow onset of the drug effect. Thus, an inhalation (but preferably not smoking) cannabinoid drug delivery system would be advantageous for treating chemotherapy-induced nausea...

It is possible that the harmful effects of smoking marijuana for a limited period of time might be outweighed by the antiemetic benefits of marijuana, at least for patients for whom standard antiemetic therapy is ineffective and who suffer from debilitating emesis."

Mar. 1999 - Institute of Medicine
"Marijuana and Medicine: Assessing the Science Base" (988 KB)

Francis L. Young, former Administrative Law Judge for the US Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), made the following statement in his Sep. 6, 1988 ruling:

"The overwhelming preponderance of the evidence in this record establishes that marijuana has a currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States for nausea and vomiting resulting from chemotherapy treatments in some cancer patients. To conclude otherwise, on this record, would be unreasonable, arbitrary and capricious."

Sep. 6, 1988 - Francis L. Young

Mitch Earleywine, PhD, Associate Professor of Psychology at University at Albany at the State University of New York, wrote in a March 5, 2009 article titled “Medical Marijuana Benefits” published at CBSNews.com:

“Opponents of medical marijuana often point to dronabinol, the synthetic version of one of marijuana’s active ingredients that is available in pill form. The use of only one active ingredient makes dronabinol less effective than medical marijuana. Many ailments respond better to a combination of marijuana’s active ingredients rather than just one. In addition, because dronabinol is a pill, it is difficult for people with nausea and vomiting to swallow. Finally, like any medication that’s swallowed, dronabinol takes a long time to digest and have its effects. Inhaled marijuana vapors can work markedly faster."

Mar. 5, 2009 - Mitch Earleywine, PhD

GW Pharmaceuticals stated the following on its website (accessed Jan. 2004):

"The anti-emetic properties of cannabis have been studied in humans more widely than any other indication. Nausea and vomiting following chemotherapy was felt to be one of the best supported therapeutic uses of cannabis and cannabinoids by the British Medical Association in their review of 23 studies, and was also supported by the American Institute of Medicine. This indication for cannabis has become common knowledge among patients, was the subject of a popular book, and has received some endorsement amongst American oncologists in a survey study.

A large body of knowledge has now been amassed in this context as a result of state-sponsored studies in the USA in cancer chemotherapy. Pooling available data in some 768 patients, oral THC provided 76-88% relief of nausea and vomiting, while smoked cannabis figures supported 70-100% relief in the various surveys."

Jan. 2004 - GW Pharmaceuticals

Continuing Medical Education, Inc. (CME), when asked (on its website) in Jan. 2000 if treating cancer chemotherapy with medical marijuana was sound treatment, replied:

"It is established that marijuana does ease the pain of cancer and the nausea of cancer chemotherapy. So, to directly address your question: It is a medically sound treatment."
 

KauKau

Contributing Member
You and Jazzy win best avatar names ever,, haha. Have you ever watched the Dana carvey skit on SNL when he sings "choppin Broccoli". It's my favorite go to song when I need to occupy my busy mind. I know, wierd. But I think of the song when I read your posts, and it makes me smile,,,,, like Jazzy. Hahha. Ok sorry, I had to get that off my chest..

And no I'm not High,,,:). I am tired from a very long day, and really Hungary,,

Good research. It's a little dated. (I actually work a bit with GW guys) everything is moving to vaping specific strains. The articles where correct with the big picture out look.. But things have improved. We are finding that An indica strain may reduce N/V while a Sativa strain will do absolutely nothing (which is so darn convient for the reefer madness dudes). I make a simple tincture of Flax seed oil/lecithin and hemp oil. One drop on your tongue will absolutely reduce N/V, I have witnessed it 1000's of times. The vaping works really well, it's just some people don't like that. The tinctures are easier and more effective.

I also make a coconut oil and hemp blend capsule. Sometimes it's a little to much on the stomache for N/V. I like to use tincture first then follow with a timed release capsule.

Sorry for spelling and grammR, I am on my phone and it just took me two hours to type that, hahaha.
 

Broccoli

Contributing Member
Thank you that is some good info KauKau. I have just discovered the lecithin and I really like it. I will try to make your tincture with it. It is interesting how the different strains work.
This thread was started with the purpose of looking for other remedies at hand when Obamacare fails. Alternative medicines will have to be used, especially in a disaster of any proportion.

Also was going to make garlic oil for ear infections.

Hope your having a good day!!!
 

KauKau

Contributing Member
Thanks. Great idea:)

I think ACV and water actually help a lot as well. I am looking forward to this discussion. Hopefully it's not just you and me, I've run out of ideas,,,, hahahah
 

BigFootsCousin

Molon Labe!
Before I was medically retired, I saw first hand (daily, in multiples) the side affects of 'too much pot' on someones' system. Look, I've seen good things happen from pot ingestion, especially those with terminal cancer, who just cannot eat, for whatever reasons. But.....I've also seen daily, and I really do mean every damn day, young people (20's-30's) coming in, making a BIG fuss out in the waiting room, because they were vomiting and were uncomfortable.

All of them essentially chain-smoked pot. Talking to them, they always had a pipe, or joint in their hands, "because it's my medicine" 24/7 per their description. It was making them sick......very, very sick. My Doctors kept trying to tell them this, but they did NOT want to hear it. Their mantra was "pot is supposed to make me feel better, not worse", so, they all kept coming in, revolving door, to get treated for n/v (nausea/vomiting) and a vague ABD discomfort as well.

I've found that in general, a 'little bit' of pot was not harmful......generally. But, when a person overloads their body with THC, and who knows what else with all of the different chemicals in it (added or otherwise), the body tends to tell its user "I've had enough!", and tries to limit its intake......

Funny how that happens.

Someday, I may be a medical patronage of THC. Especially in light of the way things are going globally, where medicine may/may not be readily available. So, don't get me wrong, I'm not haranguing on pot, just on over-doing it, which WILL make you pretty damn sick, because I've seen it first hand.

BFC
 

Broken Arrow

Heathen Pagan Witch
Before I was medically retired, I saw first hand (daily, in multiples) the side affects of 'too much pot' on someones' system. Look, I've seen good things happen from pot ingestion, especially those with terminal cancer, who just cannot eat, for whatever reasons. But.....I've also seen daily, and I really do mean every damn day, young people (20's-30's) coming in, making a BIG fuss out in the waiting room, because they were vomiting and were uncomfortable.

All of them essentially chain-smoked pot. Talking to them, they always had a pipe, or joint in their hands, "because it's my medicine" 24/7 per their description. It was making them sick......very, very sick. My Doctors kept trying to tell them this, but they did NOT want to hear it. Their mantra was "pot is supposed to make me feel better, not worse", so, they all kept coming in, revolving door, to get treated for n/v (nausea/vomiting) and a vague ABD discomfort as well.

I've found that in general, a 'little bit' of pot was not harmful......generally. But, when a person overloads their body with THC, and who knows what else with all of the different chemicals in it (added or otherwise), the body tends to tell its user "I've had enough!", and tries to limit its intake......

Funny how that happens.

Someday, I may be a medical patronage of THC. Especially in light of the way things are going globally, where medicine may/may not be readily available. So, don't get me wrong, I'm not haranguing on pot, just on over-doing it, which WILL make you pretty damn sick, because I've seen it first hand.

BFC
Everything in moderation!
 
Top