CORONA feds-seek-to-block-promotion-of-a-nasal-spray-against-covid-19

Ragnarok

On and On, South of Heaven
I bought 8 bottles a while back since everything that works becomes banned in due time ( see Ivermectin and NAC )

NEW STUDY: XLEAR NASAL SPRAY EFFECTIVE AGAINST COVID-19 AND NEW VARIANTS
New research suggests the over-the-counter nasal spray Xlear is effective at significantly reducing and nearly eliminating SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19 after a single dose. A new study done by Utah State University and Northwestern University finds Xlear components (grapefruit seed extract and xylitol) significantly eliminates SARS-CoV-2

New nasal spray that kills virus particles approved for clinical trials
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MOAfAFDeuNM


Xlear CEO explains Xlear Nasal Spray’s lasting role against COVID-19

Xlear Submits COVID-19 Pre-Emergency Use Authorization Request with FDA Regarding Use of Xlear Nasal Spray in Help in Combating SARS-CoV-2
 

aznurse

Senior Member
Feds Seek to Block Promotion of a Nasal Spray Against COVID-19 - Epoch Times

The U.S. Department of Justice filed a lawsuit in federal court against Utah-based company Xlear on Oct. 28, saying it has deceptively advertised its nasal spray as a treatment and preventative of COVID-19.


The lawsuit asks a federal court to permanently ban the company from promoting the nasal spray as a treatment of COVID-19 and also asks that monetary penalties be levied against it.


COVID-19 is the disease caused by the CCP (Chinese Communist Party) virus, commonly known as the novel coronavirus.


The DOJ filed the complaint on behalf of the Federal Trade Commission, which alleges the company has violated the Federal Trade Commission Act and the Consumer Protect Act by making false claims about the benefits.


The spray’s main ingredients are saline, grapefruit seed extract, and xylitol, a plant-derived sweetener commonly used in oral care products.


“Companies can’t make unsupported health claims, no matter what form a product takes, or what it supposedly prevents or treats,” said Samuel Levine, director of the trade commission’s Bureau of Consumer Protection.


“That’s the lesson of this case and many others like it, and it’s why people should continue to rely on medical professionals over ads,” Levine said in a press release on the lawsuit.


The commission and Justice Department declined to make any further comment.


Xlear’s attorney Robert Housman, of the Washington D.C. firm Book Hill Partners, told The Epoch Times that the commission is “flat out lying” about the company’s claims being unsupported.


Housman pointed out that the National Institute of Allergy And Infectious Diseases—along with the National Institutes of Health, an arm of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services—funded clinical studies of the use of nasal sprays like Xlear’s and published findings last year that they were an effective treatment and prevention of the coronavirus.


“When Xlear tells people about scientific studies, even ones republished by the NIH, we are somehow misleading people and making false claims. It’s nonsensical,” Housman told The Epoch Times. “Rather than embrace nasal interventions, the government is trying to eliminate their use because they don’t fit the government’s highly-flawed, vaccine-only agenda.”


On Sept. 20, 2020, the NIH and NIAID published the findings of a random clinical trial they funded at the Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Tennessee on the merits of using hypertonic nasal saline irrigations to combat the CCP virus.


The researchers in that study wrote the “effect of nasal irrigation on symptom resolution was substantial”, reporting that “nasal congestion and headaches in COVID patients resolved an average seven to nine days earlier” in the study group.


“Our analysis suggests that nasal irrigations may shorten symptom duration and may have potential as a widely available and inexpensive intervention to reduce disease burden among those affected,” the researchers wrote in their findings.


“We would advocate the use of hypertonic nasal saline irrigations in non-hospitalized COVID-19 patients as a safe and inexpensive intervention to reduce symptom burden.”


Housman pointed out that the NIH also published the results of a clinical trial, held a few months later in November at the Larkin Community Hospital in Florida, which found the Xlear nasal spray specifically cleared symptoms of the disease in half the time.


In addition to the Tennessee and Florida trials, another random clinical trial—more recently conducted at the Augusta University’s Emergency Department in Georgia—also concluded that the use of nasal spray was beneficial in treating COVID-19.


Researchers in the university trial, which is still going on, so far found that patients with the CCP virus that participated in daily nasal irrigation were eight times less likely to be hospitalized than the national rate.


The Justice Department did not specifically cite the Larkin, Vanderbilt, or Augusta trials in its lawsuit.


It instead cited the results of lab studies conducted earlier at the University of North Carolina, at Chapel Hill, and the University of Tennessee, involving in vitro and animal testing. Neither of which the DOJ and FTC argue is a viable way to test nasal spray for live, human COVID-19 patients.


The lawsuit additionally pointed out that the University of Tennessee study is based on a nasal spray containing iota-carrageenan, which the Xlear spray does not contain and, therefore, cannot be used as scientific evidence to support Xlear’s claims.


The lawsuit also stated that researchers at Chapel Hill admitted that without further research it could not conclusively determine that “administering treatment through the nose is the best way to treat COVID-19.”


Housman said the trade commission cherry picked findings within the lab studies to make them fit its agenda.


The federal government has warned other companies against promoting nasal spray for treating and preventing COVID-19.


Blue Willow Biologics, a Michigan biopharmaceutical company that manufactures a nasal antiseptic, and the Miami-based company Halodine, which created a proprietary iodine-based nasal antiseptic swab, both received warning letters earlier this year from the FDA to discontinue their promotion of their nasal products as a safe and effective treatment for COVID-19.
 

Knoxville's Joker

Veteran Member
so clearing the sinus cavity makes things get over quicker. Makes sense. Purging the sinus cavities is one of the things the body does as it is trying to purge the virus from the body. And there are actually medical procedures where that stuff has to be surgically removed if it will not self purge.
 

PalmettoGirl

Contributing Member
Anytime the government wants to ban something it just makes me want to run out and buy it. I actually did come close to buying this when my first signs of covid appeared. But I ended up buying a colloidal silver spray instead. Wish I’d bought the Xlear as well. I might not still be sick.
 

Tristan

Has No Life - Lives on TB
Feds Seek to Block Promotion of a Nasal Spray Against COVID-19 Feds Seek to Block Promotion of a Nasal Spray Against COVID-19
The leading United States manufacturer of xylitol-based products says the federal government is deliberately trying to conceal a nasal spray it developed that it says has been scientifically proven to be effective in treating and preventing COVID-19.

Not hard to believe. They've got a good grift going; why would they allow anything to interfere?
 

Murt

Veteran Member
The U.S. Department of Justice filed a lawsuit in federal court against Utah-based company Xlear on Oct. 28, saying it has deceptively advertised its nasal spray as a treatment and preventative of COVID-19.


but calling a treatment that doesn't stop you from contracting the disease a vaccine isn't
 

Mary Contrary

Veteran Member
I looked for that brand over 2 months ago all over and never found it. One of the doctors videos said to put 2 or 3 drops iodine in the nasal spray bottle. I think it was Dr. Kory. I do that. I buy the cheap Equate brand, put a bit iodine in a clean tiny paper cup and suck it up. I spray my nose before I go in the store and later when done shopping. At home too. Keep a bottle in my car, but it might freeze in winter so will keep a bottle in my pocket.
 

Mary Contrary

Veteran Member
I looked for that brand over 2 months ago all over and never found it. One of the doctors videos said to put 2 or 3 drops iodine in the nasal spray bottle. I think it was Dr. Kory. I do that. I buy the cheap Equate brand, put a bit iodine in a clean tiny paper cup and suck it up. I spray my nose before I go in the store and later when done shopping. At home too. Keep a bottle in my car, but it might freeze in winter so will keep a bottle in my pocket.
Walmart has the iodine in a large bottle - Equate 8 oz. They were low on it though. Bought it a month ago.
 

bluelady

Veteran Member
I looked for that brand over 2 months ago all over and never found it. One of the doctors videos said to put 2 or 3 drops iodine in the nasal spray bottle. I think it was Dr. Kory. I do that. I buy the cheap Equate brand, put a bit iodine in a clean tiny paper cup and suck it up. I spray my nose before I go in the store and later when done shopping. At home too. Keep a bottle in my car, but it might freeze in winter so will keep a bottle in my pocket.
You can (at least right now!) get Xlear at Amazon. It's on Subscribe & Save, too.
 

Mary Contrary

Veteran Member
Am I supposed to "suck it up" my nose? Or will just a spray work? I hate water up my nose. Am I doing it wrong? Am I supposed to "sniff" it up the nose like I saw the lady doing in the video??
 

xtreme_right

Veteran Member
The same company makes nasal rinse packets. It also has the active ingredient of xylitol. The nasal spray is convenient but I think the rinse would have better coverage. I have some of both. You could always refill the nasal spray bottle with the rinse when it runs out.
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bbbuddy

DEPLORABLE ME
Am I supposed to "suck it up" my nose? Or will just a spray work? I hate water up my nose. Am I doing it wrong? Am I supposed to "sniff" it up the nose like I saw the lady doing in the video??
It's not "water up the nose". It's soothing. Just like if you use a Neti pot, the salt and baking soda keeps it from hurting, instead it feels either "neutral" or soothing depending on whether your sinuses are inflamed.
Not the same at all.
 

night driver

ESFP adrift in INTJ sea
If you are in NEOhio or environs, check your local MARC's store. Their price on the 3/4 oz spray bottle is about 10% of other folks' prices...
We picked up a normal loadout for the 2 of us which stripped the store, so check local stores (we stripped the MARC's at the MELT shopping center off of 306 and Mentor Ave...stripped only took 4 bottles))
 

Redcat

Veteran Member
Thank you for the heads up. I only have two partial bottles left. I just ordered 4 from Amazon.
 

Sicario

The Executor
Xylitol and grapefruit seed extract nasal spray could help COVID-19 patients
Over 54.76 million people worldwide have been infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the causative pathogen of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). So far, over 1.32 million people have lost their lives to the virus in one of the greatest pandemics in recent memory.

As yet, no effective and safe therapeutic medications for COVID-19 or preventative vaccines against SARS-CoV-2 infection have been developed and rolled out for general usage. Therefore, the search continues to develop effective therapeutic options to treat COVID-19, while vaccines against its causative pathogen undergo clinical trials and await regulatory body approval.

United States-based researchers Camille Celeste Go, Krunal Pandav, Marcos A. Sanchez-Gonzalez and Gustavo Ferrer have published a report exploring the potential role of Xylitol and Grapefruit seed extract (in the form of a nasal spray) in treating COVID-19. Their study titled, “Potential Role of Xylitol Plus Grapefruit Seed Extract Nasal Spray Solution in COVID-19: Case Series,” was released in the open-access journal Cureus.

Study: Potential Role of Xylitol Plus Grapefruit Seed Extract Nasal Spray Solution in COVID-19: Case Series. Image Credit: grey_and / Shutterstock

Study: Potential Role of Xylitol Plus Grapefruit Seed Extract Nasal Spray Solution in COVID-19: Case Series. Image Credit: grey_and / Shutterstock

Background
The authors of the study explain the significant impact of COVID-19 on the healthcare systems of many countries around the world. The dearth of therapeutic options has compounded these pressures, the team writes.

Nasal epithelium and drug targets
They explain that angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and transmembrane serine protease 2 (TMPRSS2) are two potential drug targets. The ACE2 receptor acts as the binding site where the virus attaches to enter into the host cells. The TMPRSS2 also plays an important role in viral entry into the cells. These are both present abundantly in the bronchial epithelium and alveolar type II epithelium cells, as well as the epithelial lining of the nose.

Previous studies
Earlier studies have shown that nasal sprays could be a good option in both preventing SARS-CoV-2 infection and treating it.

Prior studies have also emphasized how viral shedding occurs mostly from the nose and nasal cavity, which puts healthy individuals in contact with those infected at greater risk.

Xylitol and grapefruit seed extract
The researchers identified two agents: xylitol and grapefruit seed extract (GSE), which, when administered intranasally in the form of nasal sprays could help ameliorate COVID-19 symptoms in patients.

Xylitol has had demonstrable antiviral effects in labs against several viruses, including avian influenza virus (AIV), Newcastle disease virus (NDV), infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), the team explains.

They used the xylitol-GSE nasal spray for a duration of seven days in COVID-19 patients and presented a case series of three different patients to chart its impact on their bouts of the disease.

Case 1
A 16-year-old female tested positive for COVID-19 on July 7, 2020. She was a non-smoker and had a history of iron deficiency anemia but no other comorbidities.

Their symptoms of COVID-19 were:
  • Sore throat, dry mouth
  • Nasal congestion, runny nose
  • Productive cough with yellow sputum
  • Anosmia, and ageusia (loss of taste)
After testing positive, she was enrolled in the study and instructed to take the nasal spray twice per nostril four times a day every six hours for seven days. The course of her disease was as follows:

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  • Day 1 - the patient had a stuffy nose, anosmia, ageusia, tiredness, cough, stuffiness, and congestion with normal pulse and oxygen saturation and temperature. She had mild symptoms on the Symptoms Assessment Score (SAS)
  • Day 3 - she could smell strong substances. There was an improvement in their cough, and they showed normal levels of c-reactive protein (CRP) and d-dimer
  • Day 7 - she showed improvement in overall symptoms with the absence of a cough, congestion, and stuffiness and reduced weakness and ageusia.
  • Day 7 - she tested negative for COVID-19
  • Day 14 - she returned to baseline health with no symptoms
Case 2
A 60-year-old male tested positive for COVID-19 on July 7, 2020. The patient had a history of leukemia, presently in remission. They were a heavy smoker and occasionally consumed alcohol.

Their Symptoms at the start of the condition included:
  • Sore throat, dry mouth
  • Sneezing, nasal congestion, runny nose
  • Anosmia and ageusia
  • low-grade fever at 101 Fahrenheit (F)
After testing positive, the patient was given nasal spray four times a day every six hours for seven days. The course of his disease was as follows:
  • Day 1 - the patient had a stuffy nose, sneezing, congestion, sandy and watery eyes. He had an oxygen saturation of 97% at room air and a pulse rate of 86 beats per minute. They also had anosmia and fever (101 F). Overall symptoms were rated mild on the SAS.
  • Day 2 - weakness and productive cough, with awakenings at night time due to coughing episodes. There was ageusia. No fever and oxygenation and pulse were stable.
  • Day 3 - their symptoms improved with only sandy eyes, anosmia, and ageusia
  • Day 4 - their smell slowly returned, and CRP and d-dimer tested normal.
  • Day 7 - they showed 70 to 80 percent improvements in anosmia and other symptoms of tiredness and ageusia. No fever since day 2.
  • Day 7 - they tested negative for COVID-19
  • Day 14 - they returned to baseline health with no symptoms
Case 3
38-year-old male tested positive for COVID-19 on September 26, 2020. The patient had a body mass index 30 and was a non-smoker. Their symptoms were:
  • Flu-like symptoms
  • Night sweats
  • Nonspecified fever
  • Chest X-ray showed reduced lung volumes
After testing positive, the patient was given the nasal spray to spray twice per nostril four times a day every six hours for seven days. The course of his disease was as follows:
  • Day 1 - the symptoms included runny and stuffy nose, tiredness, productive cough, nasal congestion and diarrhea. On examination, oxygen saturation was 94 percent, and there was no fever. Overall symptoms were rated mild.
  • Day 4 - their CRP and d-dimer were tested to be normal
  • Day 7 - symptoms reported were tiredness and a cough, which had improved since onset. No fever since onset.
  • Day 7 - RT PCR result was negative.
  • Day 14 - no symptoms and return to baseline health
Conclusions and implications
The three COVID-19 patients presented with mild-moderate risks and mild symptoms. They were given the intranasal nasal spray along with other adjuvant supportive treatments. The patients showed, “rapid clinical improvement and shortened time to negativization on repeat intranasal swab test via PCR.”

The spray was found to be safe, and the authors suggest that this spray could be “a potential adjunct treatment option in mild-moderate COVID-19 cases.”
 
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