Livestock Chick Orders Placed

Freeholder

This too shall pass.
I hadn't been planning to buy chicks this year, but...

Well, first, I thought I'd lost almost all of my current flock to *something.* I knew there was still a rooster, or maybe two, and possibly one hen left out of a couple dozen birds that I had two weeks ago. These guys are free-range to control ticks, and roost in trees; my livestock guardian dogs are good at keeping predators away, but I had only seen two or three birds for over a week, and thought they were mostly gone. So I finally ordered some Slow Whites from Welp! I've been wanting some of those ever since Summerthyme first recommended them, so I'm happy! And I also ordered some Speckled Sussex from Cackle; I've been wanting to try them for a long time, too.

No sooner did I press the order buttons than I looked out in the front yard, and saw at least half of my free-range flock! LOL! I don't know where they've all been, but apparently I still have at least some of them!

Kathleen
 

goatsrus

Contributing Member
I’m wishing now that I had ordered layer chicks back in the fall so they would be laying this spring. My old flock still lays enough I guess. I have raised the broilers before, but not slow whites. I might have to look into those. Good luck with your chicks!
 

Freeholder

This too shall pass.
I like to start my chicks in March. If I get them earlier, they tend to moult in the fall and then don't start laying again until around February. Much later than March, and they may not start laying that year at all, but go through the winter and again, start in February. (This is without any lights in the coop for them.) Chicks started in March will usually not moult that first fall; they start laying and keep right on through the winter.

I am looking forward to the Slow Whites. I don't like raising Cornish Cross; the last time I raised them when my older girls were still living at home, they begged me not to raise them any more because they look so awful! Poor things. I plan to keep a few of the Slow Whites and see how they do as layers, and hopefully keep on breeding them. I probably won't keep many of them because they will need to be fed, where my Icelandics are really good foragers and could probably make it through the winter without any supplemental feed at all unless we got more than a couple of inches of snow. But the Icies are laying wherever they want to, and I hardly ever get any eggs from them. They are really good tick control, so I'm happy with them (and they sure are pretty!), but we do need some hens that we can actually get eggs from.

Kathleen
 

ioujc

The CHICKEN WHISPERER
Freeholder said:
"I also ordered some Speckled Sussex from Cackle; I've been wanting to try them for a long time, too."

Oh, you will LOVE them!! I have several in my flock, as well as a rooster and they are about my favorites>>>>well, not so much the roo>>>he tries to boss me around>>>gonna get my welder's gloves on and make him be still and let me pet him!! He is so weird>>>>I have saved his life twice>>>once from dogs and once from being tangled up in some thread. He was nice a couple of days each time and then started jumping at me every time my back was turned!! But my Speckled Sussex hens are very sweet and very friendly. They come running to me when I call them and like being petted and held.

The other one I really loved>>>and dogs got her>>>was a Light Brahma. She was BEAUTIFUL>>>>but not very friendly, even when she was handled, from just about three days old, onward. She just didn't get into being friendly.

Yes, I have a lot of predators here too. Out of my 38 chicks that I raised, I am down to 25>>>>I also let them free range to keep down the bugs and there are coyotes, dogs, hawks and eagles here, as well as HUMAN thieves. One night, I locked up 32 hens and the next morning I had 28 in the hen house!!

Yeah, I figure that I will order some more hens too and I'd really like to get into turkeys and quail and pheasants too!!

Good luck with your Speckled Sussex!!
 

Freeholder

This too shall pass.
Thank you! I've only ever heard good things about the Speckled Sussex -- don't know why it's taken me so long to decide to try some. Not too worried about the roosters (I ordered five, along with twenty pullets -- will probably sell some of both once I decide which ones I'm keeping). I know how to deal with the boys, and I know how to take their spurs off, too.

Kathleen
 

summerthyme

Administrator
_______________
Thanks, CC! Welp Hatchery is the only one who carries the Slow Whites. When they say they grow slower than the Cornish X, that's absolutely true. On optimum feed, Cornish X cockerels will dress at 5# at 7 weeks. Slow White cockerels will dress 5# at 9-10 weeks. But... the next closest breeds for fast growth (Freedom Rangers, Red Rangers, and Cuckoo Marans) *may* reach 5# dressed... by FOUR TO SIX MONTHS. And they are actually efficient, compared to the "heavy breed" cockerels, or worse, the cockerels from the sex linked breeds they give away as "packing peanuts". Those may never get big enough to weigh 5# dressed!

The main difference between the Slow Whites and the Cornish X, is at 5#, the Slow White carcass will be about 6 inches longer. The breasts aren't as thick and heavy, and since they are more active birds, the leg quarters can be a little tough if baked or barbeques. But the flavor is excellent!

Summerthyme
 

China Connection

TB Fanatic
Sussex chicken
Chicken breed

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Description
Description
The Sussex is a British breed of dual-purpose chicken, reared both for its meat and for its eggs. Eight colours are recognised for both standard-sized and bantam fowl. A breed association, the Sussex Breed Club, was organised in 1903. Wikipedia
Primary use: dual-purpose meat/eggs
Egg production (annual): 250
Egg size: Large
Temperament: Alert, Docile
Recognized variety: Brown, Buff, Buff Columbian, Coronation, Light, Red, Silver, Speckled, White
Egg color: Brown, Cream, Tan
 

Attachments

China Connection

TB Fanatic
I am having fun with my bantams. I have a real mix up of breeds.

At the moment I have 21 young ones that are not yet laying. Half are real young.

Had to get small structures made/ adapted to keep each group of young ones in with their mum.

At the beginning the mothers are very protective. After a couple of months they go stir crazy and only want out. Stuff the kids who needs them....

You get all the personalities and traits with the kids developing.

One does not get bored with them.
 

ioujc

The CHICKEN WHISPERER
Well POOP!! I was hoping that some of my ladies would go broody and set some eggs so I could have babies>>>>>BUT now, something got my one roo so I guess that is NOT an option at all!! :bwl:

I guess I will go ahead and order some chicks so that I can have plenty of girls to work with>>>>was planning to sell eggs in my retirement>>>may have to revise that plan too!! :mad:

I love Speckled Sussex>>>but not sure they are the best suited for heavy layers and to eat later???
I need LOTS of eggs to sell and I guess I am going to have to revise my allowing them to free range>>>>just loose too many to make that a feasible plan. I am going to get some chicken electric fencing, but that is expensive!! I suppose I will make a composting yard for them to scratch through and that will be pretty good, but will take some time to get that going>>>>need leaves and grass clippings as well as food scraps. Have only the leaves at this point and not that many of those. Well, and some food scraps from the kitchen, but with only me I don't generate that much waste.

INPUT ANYONE??? What chickens lay eggs like crazy?? And I don't mind if they are sort of tough>>>they are gonna get boiled. Not into fried chicken and generally like to make casseroles or pot pies, that kind of stuff.
 

China Connection

TB Fanatic
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ISA Brown
Chicken breed


Description
Description
The ISA Brown is a crossbreed of chicken, with sex-linked coloration. It is thought to have been the result of a complex series of crosses including but not limited to Rhode Island Reds and Rhode Island Whites, and contains genes from a wide range of breeds, the list of which is a closely guarded secret. Wikipedia
Origin: France
Scientific name: Gallus gallus domesticus
Higher classification: Chicken
Rank: Hybrid
Other names: Hubbard Brown, Brown, Red Sexlinks
Weight: Female: 2kg (4.40lb)
 

summerthyme

Administrator
_______________
Well POOP!! I was hoping that some of my ladies would go broody and set some eggs so I could have babies>>>>>BUT now, something got my one roo so I guess that is NOT an option at all!! :bwl:

I guess I will go ahead and order some chicks so that I can have plenty of girls to work with>>>>was planning to sell eggs in my retirement>>>may have to revise that plan too!! :mad:

I love Speckled Sussex>>>but not sure they are the best suited for heavy layers and to eat later???
I need LOTS of eggs to sell and I guess I am going to have to revise my allowing them to free range>>>>just loose too many to make that a feasible plan. I am going to get some chicken electric fencing, but that is expensive!! I suppose I will make a composting yard for them to scratch through and that will be pretty good, but will take some time to get that going>>>>need leaves and grass clippings as well as food scraps. Have only the leaves at this point and not that many of those. Well, and some food scraps from the kitchen, but with only me I don't generate that much waste.

INPUT ANYONE??? What chickens lay eggs like crazy?? And I don't mind if they are sort of tough>>>they are gonna get boiled. Not into fried chicken and generally like to make casseroles or pot pies, that kind of stuff.
I love my Cuckoo Marans... they lay a dark cinnamon colored egg, lay very well through cold or heat, and are about the fastest growing cockerels of any of the egg laying breeds. BUT... if you actually want/need to make a profit selling eggs, you really ought to look into one of the sex linked breeds... Golden Comets are super layers, and are light weight birds, so their feed cost is less. And even a scrawny laying hen can make delicious soup.

Summerthyme
 

ioujc

The CHICKEN WHISPERER
Thanks Summerthyme!

I had one Cuckoo Maran in my "Barnyard Assortment" that I ordered last year. She did lay BEAUTIFUL eggs; very dark color>>>pretty big too.
I don't particularly like the sex links>>>>>>I just am not entranced with them like I am some of the others.

My feed costs have not been that high, because I let them free range>>>however the loss of birds has been pretty big. I am learning about some other options>>>>>

I guess I need to look at things realistically and not just the ones I "Like."
 

summerthyme

Administrator
_______________
guess I need to look at things realistically and not just the ones I "Like."
Sigh... yes, unfortunately, if you don't want to simply have a expensive hobby, you do have to look at it realistically. Speaking of... have you found eager potential egg buyers, willing to pay $3.00 a dozen? Because it *might* be possible to break even on a little less, depending on your climate and situation, you DO need to run it like a business- which means figuring in the cost of your birds from hatching to laying as a base expense.

It is VERY, very difficult to make ANY money on a small homestead operation. Certain, very specific locations can do it, but those are generally closer to a large city than most of us here woukd want to be located. And it requires a unique set of skills... including good sales and people skills.

I'm not trying to discourage you, not at all! But yes, a realistic attitude and the ability to run a *realistic* cash flow is vital if you aren't going to end up disappointed. And there are different levels... start SLOW! You may find that it makes more sense to keep a couple dozen hens, selling all but a dozen eggs a week (or whatever your personal use is) and consider your "free" eggs to be the profit. You can do the same with produce... grow enough for yourself, and sone extra to sell at a roadside stand or farmers market. If you're lucky, the sales will cover all your growing costs- leaving your net cost for what you ate $0.

And the really cool thing is- none of what you consume is reportable as income!

I'd rather raise my own any day, but it also makes financial sense. If you buy a dozen eggs at the store for $2, you had to make close to $4 at a job to have that $2 to spend after taxes. It takes less than 10 minutes a day to care for a flock that will give several dozen a day, and you are your own boss.

You know, the one breed that really ticks most people's "wants" when starting with chickens is the Americauna (they are a, er... less than pure? Version of the South American Araucana blue egg laying breed) The ones available at most American hatcheries are bred for egg color egg laying ability, and a mixed color flock. Most of my current flock is a "barnyard" mix of Americaunas, Whitings True Blues and Cuckoo Marans. They lay well, consistently, and in an amazing assortment of colors. Despite their small/light size (which is a benefit because they don't need as much feed to maintain themselves) they handle cold weather fine.

The Whitings True Blues were an experiment from McMurray hatchery. They did lay well, and the eggs were a pale blue. However... the eggshell quality was the worst I've ever seen... consistently. I've never see that many cracked shells. And the birds are flakier than hell! I mean, bouncing off the ceiling flaky if you walk into the coop! And since they weigh about 2#, it's impossible to keep them in an enclosure, even if you clip wings.

Fortunately, all those traits bred out of the first generation cross... but we also lost most of the blue color. <shrug> at least the eggs don't break.

Oh... I hear you on the sex links, but I've got to say, the Golden Comets were some of the nicest birds I had. Gorgeous- the chicks were like a dilute-color chipmunk- sort of apricot striped . And the hens were pretty, too. They laid a lot of large eggs! But, interestingly enougj, slthough thry were listed as non setters, we had one hen sneak off to the haymow and raise a clutch of chicks twice!

Oh, BTW... the eggs will still be fertile for up to 21 days after your roo disappeared. (I say "up to" because one insemination fertilizes about 3 weeks worth of eggs in the hen. But you don't know when that was! I did this last summer... I got an order for chicks, and three days later, the rooster dropped dead! And she didn't want them until a couple months later.

I quickly gathered enough eggs to fill the incubator and set 42. I hatched 26, which wasn't too bad. Beats buying chicks!

Summerthyme
 
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China Connection

TB Fanatic
Bantams are the way to go. I have had over a third of my females go broody this season.

One of this years young Bantams has just started to lay eggs. Quite small eggs at this point but.

You can put ordinary Chicken eggs under them. I had English Game rosters having sex with my Isa Browns which are big Chickens that produce big eggs. Bantams will sit the eggs etc.

The big thing not being talked about here but is the SHIT. Wonderful stuff you know!

If you make it that you can collect every last bit of fresh shit from where they roost and put it straight around your garden away from the base of your vegetables you will get full use out of the shit.

Get one thing straight you might have a tomato plant so you put one fresh shit close to it. Not 10 or twenty shits!

Your garden needs nitrogen but not too much, and that is what is in fresh chicken shit. You can also mix it with water and apply but just in one spot near each plant. Add a bit of sugar to the mix for even better results. .
 
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summerthyme

Administrator
_______________
Bantams definitely are the way to go in terms of having hens go bloody and/or raise chicks. And they can be very efficient egg layers... or not, depending on the breed. Silkie bantams are the most reliable broody hens out there. But they generally lay only a few dozen eggs a year, because they only lay enough to get a clutch, then start setting. They'll set on anything... I once had a Silkie bantam hatch a gosling! The egg was half as big as the hen, and geese take 9 days longer to hatch, but she stuck with it!

But unfortunately, if you want to sell eggs, or want chicken to eat, bantams aren't nearly as practical? Their eggs are perfectly tasty, and I don't have any issues with figuring the "full sized" equivalent, but customers aren't as impressed. And one hen *might* feed a person- or a couple if lots of side dishes are included!

My ideal homestead or "survival" flock would be mostly Slow Whites, with half a dozen bantams to hatch and raise chicks.

Summerthyme
 

China Connection

TB Fanatic
In China Bantam eggs are sold as farm eggs. Meaning more or less organic. They are dearer than your normal eggs.


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Top Reasons to Own Silkie Bantams
Photo of Kassandra Smith
Kassandra Smith

Senior Editor • Backyard Chicken Coops
Last Updated: 17 July 2020
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silkie-bantams-are-the-most-lovable-chooks
Silkie Bantam chickens are hands-down the most lovable chooks to ever grace backyard flocks! Though we love other breeds like ISA Browns, Plymouth Rocks and Wyandottes, there is just something about a silkie. So, why do we love to love these fluffy lil’ sweeties? Silkies have an egg-cellent temperament, they are luxuriously soft to the touch, they are one of the most unique breeds, they make ideal pets, and they are wonderful mother hens!
  • Silkie Bantams are sweet, sweeter, sweetest! We love Silkie Bantams because of their sweet, gentle and friendly temperament. These chickens are one of the most tame breeds and enjoy interacting with their human families.
  • Simply pleasing to touch, Silkies are, as their name implies, soft as a kitten’s fur and love to snuggle just like your favourite feline. Oh,we could just sit and pet these fluffy feathered friends all day!
  • Silkies are one of the most uniquely featured chicken breeds. Silkies have several characteristics that make them special in the poultry world. With their dark bluish-black skin and bones and blue-green earlobes, these chooks definitely make a fashion statement just by being themselves. Sporting an egg-stra toe, having five toes instead of the typical four, these critters really stand out in a chicken crowd! While the Silkies’ fluffy feel is an unusual trait only shared by a few other breeds, it also renders them flightless.
  • When you think of an ideal pet, Silkie Bantams definitely come to mind instantly. Due to their delightful temperament, compact size, tameness, and cuddle factor, kids and parents alike absolutely love these chickens. Just like a fuzzy little kitten, or playful puppy, these chickens will hop up into your lap and snuggle the hours away.
  • Silkies made wonderful mothers. In fact, they LOVE to brood so much that they quite often will set on other chicken’s eggs or even other species of birds, such as ducks. How “sweet” of these gals to volunteer their motherly instinct for the good of others.
So if your considering starting flock of these adorable feathered friends, you'll need to provide them with a warm, secure place to sleep! We at Backyard Chicken Coops have our own Silkie Bantam family nesting comfortably in our coops - so we know they're perfect for any new additions you're planning. Also, check out our Silkie Breed Profile for more information on this family-friendly bird.
Chickens with as much character as silkies need a coop bursting with personality. Make sure you move your fledgling flock of silkies into a Taj Mahal, Penthouse or Mansion coop. For more information about popular bantam chickens just click here.
With stunning breeds like Silkies, it's obvious that deciding to become a chicken parent is the easy part. The hardest is deciding on your favourite breed when there are so many to consider. It can be eggstremely overwhelming to find the perfect breeds for you and your family. From looks, to traits to egg-laying talents - where should you begin?
Cluckily, our friends over at Chickenpedia have created an amazing Chicken Breeds Course. This extensive online course shares useful advice on choosing the right chickens for you as well as size & frequency of eggs laid. You’ll even learn about their individual personalities, and be able to use their family-friendly compatibility scale through this well-structured program. It really is a great way to find your perfect backyard buddies which is why I highly recommend them to all of my readers! The courses are beginner-friendly and filled with vital information to help you raise a happy, healthy flock.
As chicken keepers, we want to do an eggcellent job when caring for our feathered friends. Unfortunately, many of us struggle to handle chicken health or behaviour issues, especially in the first few years of having a flock. Chickenpedia have a full range of comprehensive online courses that cover everything you didn’t know you need to know and then some more! From healthcare to raising baby chicks to feeding and behavior, get the knowledge and confidence to successfully look after your chickens like an eggspert.
As a member, you will get access to ALL their fantastic courses. So, no need to wing it, become a confident chicken keeper. Click here to check out Chickenpedia today!


Top Reasons to Own Silkie Bantams
 

Freeholder

This too shall pass.
My Speckled Sussex chicks arrived this morning! I was pretty worried, because as of last night and first thing this morning, the tracking site was giving Friday as their arrival date -- they would have been dead by then! But when I checked a second time this morning, the website had updated and said they were in our local PO. I'd ordered 25, 20 pullets and 5 cockerels. They sent 27, and all appear to be healthy, so I'm happy. I'd take a picture, but they are under a heat lamp at the moment and it's just about impossible to get a good picture under the red light. Next week -- the Slow Whites!

Kathleen
 

Freeholder

This too shall pass.
I've been hearing spring peepers here for about a week -- as soon as that cold snap eased up. So I know it's spring!

Kathleen
 

buttie

Veteran Member
There is a batch of Wellsumers coming our way on April 19th. First time I've ever ordered from a hatchery. I bought a dozen Cuckoo Marans pullets about 8 years ago and a cockerel snuck his way in. So I've been hatching dozens of birds since then. Now have a flock of 23 and a mix of 8 Whitings true blue and green birds. Decided it was time to make a change in the coop and I like the look, temperament and egg laying abilities claimed for this bird.

Ijuec, It's a little late now, but the hens will still lay fertile eggs for about 23 days after the rooster is gone. So if it happens again just put some eggs in the incubator. I was down to my last Cuckoo Marans rooster and had some eggs incubator and something got him. Fortunately there were 2 cockerels in that batch.
 

Faroe

Un-spun
My Speckled Sussex chicks arrived this morning! I was pretty worried, because as of last night and first thing this morning, the tracking site was giving Friday as their arrival date -- they would have been dead by then! But when I checked a second time this morning, the website had updated and said they were in our local PO. I'd ordered 25, 20 pullets and 5 cockerels. They sent 27, and all appear to be healthy, so I'm happy. I'd take a picture, but they are under a heat lamp at the moment and it's just about impossible to get a good picture under the red light. Next week -- the Slow Whites!

Kathleen
I was wondering if the hatcheries were switching out of USPS, or if the Postal Service was giving them actual priority. Chicks don't have a lot of time for leeway after hatching.

Some fish places I keep up with either switched to UPS (Expedited? - whatever is essentially next day), or simply stopped all shipments until delivery schedules caught up. Also, no one I've looked at is making any live-arrival guarantees unless the fastest option is indicated. I am waiting on both plants and fish. Breeders usually hold shipments until the weather is favorable at both ends.

Love fussing over baby chicks!!!
 

Freeholder

This too shall pass.
I've decided to try raising these guys on home-made feed, and see how they do. I wish I had a little more pen space so I could do a control group, though.

Kathleen
 

China Connection

TB Fanatic
Make sure you add rock dust or shell-grit to the food quickly or you will start to loose them.

Sprouts and added protein of some kind will have them doing well.
 

ioujc

The CHICKEN WHISPERER
Well, I FINALLY ordered my chicks. Had it all set up to do earlier, but then didn't get it done.

I went ahead and ordered another brown egg collection because I have enjoyed these so much!! I guess if they breed (I'm pretty sure I will end up with at least one roo) they will just be "WEIRD" chickens!!

BTW, I just ate all of my pickled eggs (over a period of this past 10 days, NOT all at once!! And I only did one quart this time!) that I made before I had surgery about a month ago. I fixed them in sweet pickle juice, but they had very little flavor>>>>>they were delicious, but not what I expected>>>>did I not wait long enough for them to absorb the flavor??

Still no baby goat from Mamma!! She is still talking to me a lot, but has calmed down a bit. That little critter inside her is kickin' up a storm!! Hopefully there is at least two, but I will be happy with one that is healthy!!

She does not act like my Angoras>>>of course they were all older goats and knew what they were doing. She is having her first and I guess for anyone that is a bit confusing!! Human or animal!! And scary!! I have been going out and petting her and loving on her several times a day. I am SO BLESSED that this is happening right after I retired!!

AND>>>I have suffered from clinical depression for at least 25 years>>>>Now it has reduced a GREAT DEAL!! Gee, I wonder was it my CRAPPY job??? Yeah, pretty sure it was!! Still working two days a week, but all I have to say is>>>>>

THANK GOD I'M FREE>>>>FREE AT LAST!!
 
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Freeholder

This too shall pass.
Our Slow Whites came on Friday (March 12). They must have hatched mid-week. Had me worried, because unlike Cackle, Welp never sent me an e-mail to say they were on their way. But they got here safe and sound, 25 chicks in the box. Lost one yesterday but the rest look like they are doing fine.

While we were out to pick them up, we went the rest of the way to town and got some game-bird starter. The home-made feed seemed to be working well, but it was getting to be a lot of extra work, as the chicks grew and ate more, and I figured with the number of chicks doubling it would be more than I wanted to do right now. Also bought six goslings (hopefully three Embdens and three Toulouse or Gray Farm Geese), three Buckeye chicks just because I really like Buckeyes and they were the last three in the bin, and ten mixed ducklings. I'm fairly sure that two of the ducklings are Khaki Campbells, but can only guess at the others. Four have Mallard-type markings; they are the biggest, and may be Rouens. The other four are either yellow (one with a pouf on it's head) or mostly yellow with some smoky down. Several breeds start out that color, so will just have to wait and see.

I've been wishing we had ducks and geese here, and finally decided to just do it. We have a small pond (only about twenty or thirty feet across), and plenty of forage for them. I expect the ducks, at least, will probably also go through the fence and use the neighbor's pond in the cow pasture, which is two or three times the size of mine. The ducklings are in with all of the chicks; the six goslings are in a box next to me -- they are too big to put in with the smaller chicks and ducklings. I was trying to figure out what to do for heat for the goslings, and remembered that my heated footrest can stand up on one side and work as a space heater for the foot space under the desk, so it's in the box with the babies, and they are doing fine with that. They make sweet little trilling sounds and soft peeps, and I talk to them, LOL!

My daughter is tickled pink with all of the new babies, too. She carried all three boxes home on her lap.

Oh -- the Speckled Sussex, who will be two weeks old tomorrow, are already starting to look speckled! I wasn't sure how soon the color pattern would develop, but apparently fairly quickly.

Kathleen
 

marsh

TB Fanatic
Saw this and thought it was a cute idea. People who have used it say that the chicks love it. You would have to be careful around a heat source like a heat lamp. Perhaps you wouldn't need one.

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Freeholder

This too shall pass.
Saw this and thought it was a cute idea. People who have used it say that the chicks love it. You would have to be careful around a heat source like a heat lamp. Perhaps you wouldn't need one.

View attachment 257681
I suspect that would work just fine in a warm room! Probably wouldn't be enough in an outside shed or other unheated space, though. If you just had a small number of babies, jars full of hot water would probably work, as long as they were changed frequently. This would take close watching and wouldn't be very convenient at night. Or a location next to a wood stove that was being kept going might work. Of course, best to just get a broody hen.

Kathleen
 

Digger

Senior Member
Years ago I bought some golden comet chicks at our local feed store. They were like a light weight buff orpington. I really loved those but have never found anymore like them. The golden comets of today are not the same bird.
 

China Connection

TB Fanatic
Um, what a so called summer it has been here where I live in Australia.

My first lot of young chickens are lying well now. Second lot all rosters third lot still don't know, forth lot growing well. Fifth lot still eggs under mother.

Should get about 30 all together this season. Hoping for at least half females. Lots of rosters for the pot on the go...

The rain is supposed to stop today. 18,000 people here on the Mid North Coast of NSW have had to be rescued from their homes due to floods in the last week. Working on a new chicken shed and run.

I'm going to set up better to collect poo from my hens etc. I have quite a number of raised beds growing vegetables.

.
 
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