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CHAT Cost of Tea vs. Cost of Coffee?
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  1. #41
    We use a Keurig machine and a Nespresso Vertuo machine. I am allowed one cup of decaf a day (versus pre heart attack-2 10 cup pots of Folgers, then coffee in the evenings) so the Keurig makes sense. Folger's decaf is available in K cups and I get 18 day's coffee out of one box. Wife drinks a lot of coffee, so she buys K cups on sale. She picked up 10 boxes of 18 K cups of some flavored coffee this past weekend, at $ 1.46 a box. So the cost of the K cups for her at least is cheap. And she likes the variety, that's a plus.

    We both drink tea. Wife likes any and every kind of tea; one cabinet in our kitchen is her "tea store". Again, she catches it on sale and stocks up. She's a tea bag reuser, at least twice generally. I like to drink Russian tea (the real loose leaf stuff) and a pound of it costs 6.50. Have to watch drinking it though, has a lot of caffeine (but real Russian tea tastes SO good).

    We don't do Starbucks anymore-liberal agendas and every drink tastes burnt did that for us. We have the Nespresso Vertuo for our "specialty" drinks. The coffee for this machine is metal pods, costs 8.50 a sleeve of 8. Comes out to $ 1.10 a cup or thereabouts. But the coffee is GOOD. Wife chugs the expresso, they make a decaf expresso too. Wife sees a drink at Starbucks and comes home and recreates it with the Vertuo-she just made us a chocolate expresso (sugar free, decaf and homemade whipped cream on top for me.) She normally drinks it strong and straight up. The creative angle is the hook for her; and I'm a willing guinea pig.

    The K cup and Vertuo route probably isn't the most cost effective solutions for our drinks, but there's just the two of us and brewed/drip coffee would just go to waste (unless Astor starts drinking coffee).

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
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    11,167
    I was looking at the prices of coffee and coffee beans earlier on Amazon and on Walmart's site, and was surprised at the wide range of costs per ounce. Just going by that, I do think even the cheaper coffees are more expensive than the plain black tea I usually drink.

    Kathleen
    Behold, these are the mere edges of His ways, and how small a whisper we hear of Him.
    Job 26:14

    wickr ID freeholder45

  3. #43
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    The general rule is that if you have to ask the price you can't afford it.
    "When law and morality contradict each other, the citizen has the cruel alternative of either losing his moral sense or losing his respect for the law." ~ Frederic Bastiilt

    "Duty is ours; results are God's."

  4. #44
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    May 2001
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    K-cups: how to charge $50/lb for $5/lb coffee.

  5. #45
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    May 2015
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    If I drink tea, it's Earl Grey. I found that in 1966 at college. Loved it and still enjoy it. However, I prefer coffee. Peet's French Roast is hearty and smooth. I grind the beans.

    I never thought of the cost of one vs. the other.
    1. If you import the Third World, you become the Third World. It really is that simple.
    2. The greatest trick the devil ever pulled was to convince the world he didn't exist
    3. If you have not been to the range in a month, you are under performing.

  6. #46
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    Illinois
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    Quote Originally Posted by Countrybumpkin View Post
    My dad has said when he was in the Army, they'd put new grounds on old until the basket was full, then dump it out and start again.
    That's exactly what we did. We could get over a week before needing to start over. I think 12 days was a record. Had to have someone in the office all the time because of classified material, so the pot was almost always on.

    I opened a can of coffee that was about ten years old a couple weeks ago. I'm drinking it now, and can't tell any difference between it, and new stuff. Freshly ground is another matter.
    "Freedom is not something to be secured in any one moment of time. We must struggle to preserve it every day. And freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction."
    -Ronald Reagan

  7. #47
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    We buy Costa Rican in 50 lb. Bulk and store it in glass jars in the root cellar. It will store in green bean forever. We medium roast about 1/2 pound at a time and fresh grind and drip our cup of coffee. Yea we are coffee snobs but we still get a pound of green bean for about $5 delivered. So our coffee habit works out to about $2.50 a week. Not bad for getting the best. Keep more than a year on hand being a devout prepper and coffee drinker.
    My Dad would never approve. He was hard core WW2 volume coffee drinker. He even carried his own little percolator and would brew a pot, and drink it before bed. Never new a man to drink so much coffee day or night.
    "They wanted to be left alone to face challenges head-on, and to prosper from their own hard work and ingenuity...harsh country tends to produce strong people."-John Erickson

  8. #48
    I use to have a drip coffee pot that made 8 to 10 cups. I only drink one or two cups a day. It sat on the counter and collected grease splatters from cooking and took up space. I have since bought a French Press coffee pot. It tucks into the cupboard well. I put in two scoops of coffee and then poor boiling water over it. I let it sit for 3 minutes and then press the coffee to the bottom. Makes about 1 and a half large cups of coffee. If I have extra I let it sit on the counter and then put it in the microwave to reheat. It costs about 15 dollars for the French press at walmart or Costco.

    Here is an example. https://www.amazon.com/gp/slredirect...getName=sp_atf


    French Press High-Grade Stainless-Steel Single Cup or 32 Ounce Multi-Cup Coffee Maker, Coffee Press For Gourmet Coffee At Home With This French Coffee Press



    by Mr Kitchen OIG Brands



    4.2 out of 5 stars
    78 ratings
    | 16 answered questions

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    North Central Louisiana
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    9,139
    We have a coffee scoup, maybe 1 1/2 T, we start with a clean filter and put the scoup of coffee in it, the next day we put the scoup on top of the grounds from the day before and do that until the filter is over flowing. Tastes fine and saves on filters, I like the unbleached kind. I'm not sure what its costs per cup and its not an issue. Gotta have my coffee and depending on how much DH drinks I might make a second half pot later. I buy the largest canister of Folgers and mix it with a large package of Community Coffee and Chicory. This lasts up to three months and I keep four of those combinations on hand all the time. Plus I store instant coffee that is in glass jars. The instant in the plastic jars gets nasty after awhile. I have herbal tea and drink it on occasion and I vacuum seal the tea bags.

    Judy

  10. #50
    Just a couple of comments;

    1) all one ever needed was "a little water" to make coffee, as Millwright noted in post #35. And it's not just for cowboys, use to make it that way sitting on a river bank at the hunting shack, when catfishing, or squirrel hunting, in MS. Over an open campfire, and strain through teeth. I understand Dennis' comment in that no electricity needed, but hey what heated the water? LOL

    2) using "used" coffee on a second pass usually means a weaker batch, so we do add some to strengthen back up to the point of standing a spoon up in it. Then it is reused as addition to the compost pile, or directly into the garden. And that's for tea, and coffee grounds. Not to mention egg shells, to add calcium to the tomato bed.

    3) any prepper who doesn't have a coffee grinder, isn't a serious prepper. There are all kinds of subs that can be used (okra seeds, beech nuts) which need to be parched, and …..ground. Making fresh ground coffee now, is a wonder. Like fresh baked bread.

    4) for southerners one wild item to remember is the Sasararas tree to make tea. (if you don't live in the south don't worry about it, if you do live in the South but don't know what a Sasararas tree looks like, renounce your citizenship and move north LOL)

    For info on how to make check here:

    https://www.wikihow.com/Make-Sassafras-Tea

    And then there is the Mint Julep. For info check here. After a few of these you won't care what you're drinking.

    https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/49444/mint-juleps/
    "Wise Men Still Seek Him"-bumper sticker

    "Our Constitution is designed only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate for any other."-John Adams
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  11. #51
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    OK
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    Prep Note:

    When the EMP () and following financial collapse has knocked us back to living in mud huts, you will get no imported coffee or tea.

    There is a native plant that is fairly high in caffeine...and almost impossible to eradicate.





    Here's The Buzz On America's Forgotten Native 'Tea' Plant

    During a severe drought in 2011, JennaDee Detro noticed that many trees on the family cattle ranch in Cat Spring, Texas, withered, but a certain evergreen holly appeared vigorous. It's called a yaupon.

    "The best we can tell is that they enjoy suffering," Detro says with a laugh. "So this kind of extreme weather in Texas — and the extreme soil conditions — are perfect for the yaupon."

    Detro began researching yaupon — a tree abundant in its native range, from coastal North Carolina to East Texas — and discovered that the plant contains caffeine and has a remarkable history.

    A thousand years ago, Native American traders dried, packed and shipped the leaves all the way to Cahokia, the ancient mound city near the confluence of the Missouri and Mississippi rivers. Native Americans sometimes used it in purification rituals involving purging (this led to its Latin name, Ilex vomitoria — a misnomer, because yaupon is not an emetic). Traveling through North Carolina in 1775, the naturalist William Bartram said Cherokees called yaupon "the beloved tree." Early settlers even exported yaupon to Europe.

    But yaupon was eventually elbowed aside by what purists call true tea — made from the leaves of the Asian shrub Camellia sinensis. (Technically, yaupon is an herbal infusion.) Because of yaupon's recent obscurity, Detro had to learn how to dry and prepare the leaves on her own.

    "There is a lost art of preparing yaupon tea," says Detro, "because there are so many years between the Native American use of yaupon tea and our modern use of yaupon tea."

    After Detro learned how to process the leaves, she told her sister, Abianne Falla, about her plans to sell the product at a farmers market or two. "At first, when she was telling me about it, I kind of had the same mentality of everyone around here, 'Well, let me taste it first,' " says Falla. "And as soon as I did, it was like, 'We might be onto something. I think we should make a run of it.' "

    The sisters started selling their Cat Spring Yaupon Tea online two years ago, both a green tea and a roasted black tea. And Falla began getting the tea onto store shelves and into restaurants. Now the tea is being served at Austin restaurants like Dai Due and Odd Duck that focus on locally sourced food.

    Odd Duck manager Jason James said he was surprised to learn about the tea. But he was pleased to find the taste familiar. "The flavor profile of it, I don't think it's too far off from a black tea," he says. "The tannin structures are a little bit different."

    James says the lack of tannins can be a benefit, because it is harder to oversteep the tea. He recently started serving yaupon in lieu of black tea, and now the lunch crowd drinks 4 or 5 gallons daily. "Being that we had that ethic of sourcing local, and being sustainable, this just fit the bill," James says.

    Detro and Falla have had some guidance along the way from Steve Talcott, a professor of food chemistry at Texas A&M University. Talcott says that yaupon, like coffee and tea, is rich in the antioxidants known as polyphenols. And it's the only native North American plant he knows of that contains caffeine. He says the caffeine levels in yaupon vary, but are roughly comparable to green or black tea.

    Talcott says he loves to watch people's reactions when he tells them that this common outdoor tree can be turned into a tasty, and buzz-delivering, brew.

    "I'll walk out and pick some leaves off a plant and go, 'This is the only plant we know in North America that contains caffeine. I can make a wonderful tea out of this.' And they are just like, 'No, no way,' " says Talcott. "It's just amazing, until they actually try the tea. Until you try it for the first time, you'd just be blown away that it's an edible food."

    Drinking iced tea at the corner store in Cat Spring in the heat of the day, construction worker David Avery is a bit skeptical. He says he has spent many hours on a bulldozer, tearing up yaupon, which encroaches on hay fields and pastures.

    "Ahhh, yaupon. Shoot, if you're from around here, you just want to get rid of it," Avery says. "Most of the people, we don't do anything with it. First that I've heard that they're making tea."

    But Avery says he'd like to try it. And he's not alone. Detro and Falla have sold enough yaupon to brew more than 100,000 cups of tea, to customers in 36 states. With other companies in Georgia and Florida now selling yaupon, it may be poised for a comeback that's long overdue.

    https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt...tive-tea-plant
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  12. #52
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    Oct 2001
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    Green County, Kentucky
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    If I was a serious coffee drinker, the price difference would probably be irrelevant to me, too, but I went most of my life liking the smell and disliking the taste of coffee. It's only a few years ago that I finally got to where I liked the taste, and just now that I can drink a cup or two a day without feeling sick the rest of the day. So it wouldn't really bother me much to do without it. Growing my own tea would definitely be the cheapest, and I do need to get more herbal tea materials growing here. We do have sassafras -- I'll read up on that!

    I ordered a stainless steel French press coffee maker yesterday (my ex was given a glass French press one time and I promptly dropped it and broke it, so I wasn't going to get a glass one). It wasn't terribly expensive, so if I decide I don't need it at some point, I can pass it on to the grandchildren, who are on the verge of moving out on their own.

    I've heard of mint juleps, but I don't drink alcohol, so will probably never try one of those, LOL!

    Kathleen
    Behold, these are the mere edges of His ways, and how small a whisper we hear of Him.
    Job 26:14

    wickr ID freeholder45

  13. #53
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    Jun 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by Freeholder View Post
    My daughter says she uses a little over a quarter of a cup of grounds to make 16 oz. of coffee with the drip-in-the-cup system. This is similar to what she uses: https://www.amazon.com/Kalita-5033-W...rucepublish-20

    I had never heard of these before today, but it does make sense -- you don't have to have another small appliance sitting out on the countertop, just a way to get hot water.

    Kathleen
    This is the same system that my daughters use. Hubby and I are NOT coffee drinkers despite our upbringing by families that drank coffee like it was water. My father in law drank two or three pots of strong Cuban coffee daily. Who knows how many pots of coffee my dad and mom's family drank as there was simply a pot going constantly all day long.

    I will tell you that my daughters have dramatically dropped their cups of coffee per day/week. The "new" has worn off and at 20 and 23 they have finally realized the stuff really isn't all that good for you, especially if you factor in creamer and sugar (though they tend to drink theirs black). Once I made them start paying for their own dental bills and even with constant brushing their teeth were yellowing they figured it out. LOL Not to mention I refuse to buy coffee at the grocery so that means they have to buy it. Sucks to have to adult like that don't it. LOL
    Find my free fiction stories here.

    "Isn’t it interesting that the same people who laugh at science fiction listen to weather forecasts and economists?” - Kelvin R. Throop III

  14. #54
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    May 2004
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    There are plenty of wild plants and common, easily grown herbs around locally that I know to use for nice pleasant tea, but Millwright was correct in mentioning the caffeine factor, because for most of us, it's the "effect" we crave/use when it comes down to it.

    I have Grandpa's old Arcade wall hanging coffee grinder in the kitchen and can easily grind beans (especially since they are so readily available these days) but for "effect"? As a prep item, I store instant in factory sealed glass jars. Can't beat it for expediency and shelf life.

  15. #55
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    I read up on the yaupon holly, and since we are on the southern edge of growing zone 6, I think that with winter protection I might be able to keep those alive here. I'm going to see if I can find some plants to buy.

    Oh, and the main reason I chose to get a French press is because it works for making tea from loose leaves, too. So we can use it whether we are drinking tea or coffee.

    Kathleen
    Behold, these are the mere edges of His ways, and how small a whisper we hear of Him.
    Job 26:14

    wickr ID freeholder45

  16. #56
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    I just have tea balls for loose leaf. Both cup size and pot sized.



  17. #57
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    Aug 2004
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    I have been making tea in my drip coffee maker for decades. (My stomach can't take the acid in coffee.) I use 3 regular tea bags - 1 orange peko, 1 green and 1 black. Nowadays I have to watch the bags as some companies are only putting half the tea in - so you may get 100 tea bags and only have half the tea, so I double up and watch the prices. I put the bags in the pot, add water, and try to wait 10 min to steep the tea. Then I add another batch of bags for a second batch for afternoon. I also use filtered water as our tap water is gross. If hubby is wanting a caffeine high he adds a scoop of instant coffee.

  18. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by WalknTrot View Post
    I just have tea balls for loose leaf. Both cup size and pot sized.


    I have tea balls, too -- several kinds of them. I don't like using them, so they mostly sit in the drawer. But I do have them in case we want them for something.

    Kathleen
    Behold, these are the mere edges of His ways, and how small a whisper we hear of Him.
    Job 26:14

    wickr ID freeholder45

  19. #59
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    The Aeropress that I posted a picture of above is a “better” French press. It’s much faster and easier to clean.

  20. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Olson View Post
    The Aeropress that I posted a picture of above is a “better” French press. It’s much faster and easier to clean.
    The only reason I didn't pick this one (though I may try it later) is because it only makes one cup. There are two of us here and I figured it would make more sense to get something that would make two cups right off the bat. But I did do some reading about the Aeropress, and added it to my wish list so I remember it next time I have a few dollars to spend.

    Kathleen
    Behold, these are the mere edges of His ways, and how small a whisper we hear of Him.
    Job 26:14

    wickr ID freeholder45

  21. #61
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    Actually, it can make up to three cups. The amount of water stays constant, but you can vary the amount of coffee you put in. Once you’ve pressed the water into the cup, just add water to taste. If you don’t add any water, it’ll be extremely strong. But most folks don’t see that part of it. They only know the “regular ways” to make coffee, where no water is added after the coffee is made. (The Aeropress doesn’t even hold enough water for a single “regular size cup” - that is, a mug of coffee.) Think of it as a device for making a “coffee slurry” if you will. And if you’ve never used a french press, you may not like it. You get a lot of sediment in the coffee, since there’s no filtration. It also takes a long time to clean, and you have to clean it after each use. This is not the case with an Aeropress.

  22. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Olson View Post
    Actually, it can make up to three cups. The amount of water stays constant, but you can vary the amount of coffee you put in. Once you’ve pressed the water into the cup, just add water to taste. If you don’t add any water, it’ll be extremely strong. But most folks don’t see that part of it. They only know the “regular ways” to make coffee, where no water is added after the coffee is made.
    Ah -- that makes sense. They should mention that in the description! But it's not terribly expensive, and I should be able to pick one up before too long. Then I can compare the two methods.

    Kathleen
    Behold, these are the mere edges of His ways, and how small a whisper we hear of Him.
    Job 26:14

    wickr ID freeholder45

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