Check out the TB2K CHATROOM, open 24/7               Configuring Your Preferences for OPTIMAL Viewing
  To access our Email server, CLICK HERE

  If you are unfamiliar with the Guidelines for Posting on TB2K please read them.      ** LINKS PAGE **



*** Help Support TB2K ***
via mail, at TB2K Fund, P.O. Box 24, Coupland, TX, 78615
or


VIDEO Skin and Process a Deer in 10 Minutes Without Gutting It
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 18 of 18
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    17,029

    Skin and Process a Deer in 10 Minutes Without Gutting It


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-Wdwjlu9mY

    http://www.deeranddeerhunting.com Expert whitetail hunting guide Jon Heaton from Texas explains how he learned to fully process a deer in less than 10 minutes.

    RT 12:17
    🇺🇸T🇺🇸R🇺🇸U🇺🇸M🇺🇸P🇺🇸
    🇺🇸🇺🇸2🇺🇸0🇺🇸2🇺🇸0🇺🇸🇺🇸

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    OK
    Posts
    33,649
    Great video.

    That's how we've been doing it for years.

    A coupla details that I haven't thought of.

    Dude is good.


    I did a quick thread on doing pigs like this in the Outdoors section, but just with pics.

    http://www.timebomb2000.com/vb/showt...41#post7083641
    Proud Infidel...............and Cracker

    Member: Nowski Brigade

    Deplorable


  3. #3
    And the neck roast, the ribs, and the backbone all went in the gut bucket?

    Not at my house, it doesn't. Those go straight in the crockpot and then after a day, into the pressure canner. We don't waste much around here. I could live well on what this guy throws away.
    Don't be dismayed by goodbyes. A farewell is necessary before you can meet again. And meeting again, after moments or lifetimes, is certain for those who are friends. --Richard Bach

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    OK
    Posts
    33,649
    Quote Originally Posted by Seeker22 View Post
    And the neck roast, the ribs, and the backbone all went in the gut bucket?

    Not at my house, it doesn't. Those go straight in the crockpot and then after a day, into the pressure canner. We don't waste much around here. I could live well on what this guy throws away.
    That little Texas doe was probably 70-80lb.

    You can spend a coupla hours boning out the ribs & neck and get 2lbs of meat.

    It really isn't that productive.
    Proud Infidel...............and Cracker

    Member: Nowski Brigade

    Deplorable


  5. #5
    Still pretty slick

  6. #6
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by Millwright View Post
    That little Texas doe was probably 70-80lb.

    You can spend a coupla hours boning out the ribs & neck and get 2lbs of meat.

    It really isn't that productive.
    But my dogs get most of what they waste. However I admit that I dont debone the ribs, neck, etc.. dogs do that. Though the "metal cuting" sawzall blade is used a lot. Including the breast bone to get to the heart and liver. Well for much easier access to the heart and then cut down threw the throat to remove esophagus and provide a good drain for a good wash out.

    Besides, usally the neck is mostly blown to hambuger, useing 165 grain 30- 06.
    Last edited by West; 10-23-2019 at 08:55 PM.

  7. #7

    10

    I love this time of year. And just got permission to hunt another private 80 acres, in my back yard! Loving it. Thank you Lord!

  8. #8
    Looks like a hack job to me.......lots of wasted meat, especially noticeable on the back strap, flanks and rib meat. I agree, it's not a lot of meat on a small doe, but I'd not do it that way. We gut them, get them cold, hang em and bone em out later...... with a lot less loss of meat. My dog eats good these days. Have processed eight, got nine hanging, and getting to them come monday. Expect to have another eight or ten by then.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Southwest (enjoy it!)
    Posts
    4,783
    Gut-shot deer.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Millwright View Post
    That little Texas doe was probably 70-80lb.

    You can spend a coupla hours boning out the ribs & neck and get 2lbs of meat.

    It really isn't that productive.
    I'm retired so I have all the time in the world to cut meat. If an 80 pound doggie deer is what I have, I'll use everything I am able. At one time, I had 8 Catahoulas and a Black Lab. That meat was necessary. I cut out the pipes and the heart gets diced up and goes into Pinto beans. Those get canned in Pint jars. There are other "guts" that are usable. I use a large set of tree limb loppers to cut the legs and any other bones. This does leave bone chips that I pick off before cooking. When I take the backbone and rib sections out of the crockpot, there is no meat on them. All of that goes in the canner.

    Here's my BBQ Venison recipe: Put all that cooked meat from an 8 quart crockpot in a steel bowl in the fridge and make sure you have all the bones/fragments out. Your hands will be a greasy mess. Put a little corn meal in a bowl to rub the grease off your hands with. Sausage makers do this. Then, you can reach for the detergent and the faucet. I have made fried corn fritters out of this greasy cornmeal for the pups.

    In the morning, add an 18oz. bottle of Barbeque sauce (or make your own) to the meat. Stir well. Turn out into a glass 9x13 Pyrex baking dish. Add water an inch from top of dish. Cover with foil and bake at 350 degrees for an hour.

    Put 1 teaspoon of canning salt in each of your wide mouth Quart canning jars. While the meat is still warm, fill each jar to the shoulder. Pour the excess water from the Pyrex pan in each jar and add tap water to the 1" headspace if necessary. Wipe rims using a napkin soaked in white vinegar to cut the grease. Do not use the same section of napkin twice. If any grease is left on the jar rim, the jar will not seal. Can according to your altitude for 1.5 hours.

    Once those jars have popped and cooled (usually the next day) I clean the grease off the outsides with very hot soapy water, original (green) Palmolive, and Mean Green's Orange Clean spray. Get all the deer tallow off the jars and the metal rings. I use a foam "scrubbie" which has a green scrubber on one side and foam on the other. Get these in packs at the Dollar Store.

    This IS a lot of work, but I don't go to the store for meat very often and I don't have to worry much about what my dogs eat. I raw pack Venison burger or cubed venison the same way (sans BBQ Sauce, of course) and the pups don't complain. Neither do I when I can put together a nice meal in under five minutes. Time is paid ahead, but it is worth all the work to me.

    You will be pleasantly surprised, and tired, to see those jars add up over a deer season. Waste not, want not.
    Don't be dismayed by goodbyes. A farewell is necessary before you can meet again. And meeting again, after moments or lifetimes, is certain for those who are friends. --Richard Bach

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    in the middle of GA
    Posts
    2,639
    the neck roast is one of my favorite cuts

    cook in the crock pot with cream of mushroom soup and onion soup mix---good atuff

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    OK
    Posts
    33,649
    I did see something new last year.

    Using limb loppers to whack the ribs off a pig.

    Just work right up the spine, clipping the ribs.
    Proud Infidel...............and Cracker

    Member: Nowski Brigade

    Deplorable


  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    in the middle of GA
    Posts
    2,639
    Quote Originally Posted by Millwright View Post
    I did see something new last year.

    Using limb loppers to whack the ribs off a pig.

    Just work right up the spine, clipping the ribs.
    I saw someone doing that
    I just use the sawzall--I am already carrying so much crap that I need a porter

    MW
    when you skin hogs do you take the skin off in one piece or do you take it off in strips?
    I have been taking it off in strips about 6-8 inches wide--I use a utility knife with a hooked blade (kind of like a gut hook)and run it from tail to nose and make strips ---for my old hands it seems to be easier and quicker

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    OK
    Posts
    33,649
    Quote Originally Posted by Murt View Post
    I saw someone doing that
    I just use the sawzall--I am already carrying so much crap that I need a porter

    MW
    when you skin hogs do you take the skin off in one piece or do you take it off in strips?
    I have been taking it off in strips about 6-8 inches wide--I use a utility knife with a hooked blade (kind of like a gut hook)and run it from tail to nose and make strips ---for my old hands it seems to be easier and quicker
    I do about four, peel it like a banana.

    Pics in the other thread I linked to in post #2.

    Sawzall doesn't work well if you dont' gut it. (like in the video)

    Limb loppers don't poke into the body cavity like a sawzall blade.

    I may have to try the hooked utility blades, decent gut hook knives are hard to find around here. On a whim, I grabbed a coupla cheep plastic letter openers to try on skinning. They are in my cleaning bucket.
    Proud Infidel...............and Cracker

    Member: Nowski Brigade

    Deplorable


  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    in the bunker
    Posts
    1,316
    A guy that knows what he doing can cut up big Yukon moose into transportable pieces in 45 minutes. It is impressive. Too get that good you probably need cut up 100 moose.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    in the bunker
    Posts
    1,316
    I myself can cut up a single salmon in 2 minutes, sometimes less. I don't gut them. Probably have to cut hundreds to get that fast.6 slices of the knife.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    OK
    Posts
    33,649
    Quote Originally Posted by ivantherussian03 View Post
    A guy that knows what he doing can cut up big Yukon moose into transportable pieces in 45 minutes. It is impressive. Too get that good you probably need cut up 100 moose.
    Years ago, we'd drag a deer up over a limb with a rope, using the 4-wheeler.

    Probably hard to do when the moose weighs twice as much as the bike.
    Proud Infidel...............and Cracker

    Member: Nowski Brigade

    Deplorable


  18. #18
    I think aging and butchering ones own deer is a must have experience that many deer hunters never do. Or have and found it to be to much work. We/I do our own deer and have since the late 70s. I did get lazy a few years and I think professional butchered venison just doesn't taste as good. Also I age my venison at least a full week...

    https://www.cabelas.com/category/CWC.../635072580.uts

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts


NOTICE: Timebomb2000 is an Internet forum for discussion of world events and personal disaster preparation. Membership is by request only. The opinions posted do not necessarily represent those of TB2K Incorporated (the owner of this website), the staff or site host. Responsibility for the content of all posts rests solely with the Member making them. Neither TB2K Inc, the Staff nor the site host shall be liable for any content.

All original member content posted on this forum becomes the property of TB2K Inc. for archival and display purposes on the Timebomb2000 website venue. Said content may be removed or edited at staff discretion. The original authors retain all rights to their material outside of the Timebomb2000.com website venue. Publication of any original material from Timebomb2000.com on other websites or venues without permission from TB2K Inc. or the original author is expressly forbidden.



"Timebomb2000", "TB2K" and "Watching the World Tick Away" are Service Mark℠ TB2K, Inc. All Rights Reserved.