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OT/MISC Marine Raiders, Navy SEALs and PJs: What You Need To Now About Air Force, Marine and Navy Special Forces
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  1. #1
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    Marine Raiders, Navy SEALs and PJs: What You Need To Now About Air Force, Marine and Navy Special Forces

    These guys and gals are the real warriors that keep America safe. No doubt about it.

    Michael

    For fair use education/research purposes.

    The link: https://nationalinterest.org/blog/bu...arine-and-navy

    The article:

    Marine Raiders, Navy SEALs and PJs: What You Need To Now About Air Force, Marine and Navy Special Forces
    by Sebastien Roblin



    The best of the best. Period.


    Special operations forces have been at the forefront of U.S. combat operation in the last two decades. They are nearly at the forefront of risky combat missions—and suffer higher casualties as they are often deployed to remote locations and exposed to greater risks.

    A companion article details the special operations units of the U.S. Army and the distinction between various tiers of special operations units.

    In this second part we’ll dive into the special operations units of the U.S. Air Force, Marine Corps and Navy, and look at recent challenges facing the special operations community.

    The Marine Raider Regiment

    The Marine Corps historically resisted the creation of elite special operations units, instead designating some reconnaissance units as ‘Special Operations Capable’ with training for airborne and seaborne insertion.

    Today, these include four Force Reconnaissance Companies, primarily assigned to support to Marine expeditionary forces, and three Divisional Reconnaissance Battalions which incorporate Deep Reconnaissance Platoon including specialized combat divers to perform beach and landing zone reconnaissance, and direct air and artillery strikes.

    During World War II, however, the Marines briefly operated two unconventional Raider battalions involved in some spectacular island assaults, including an epic submarine-launched raid on a Japanese seaplane base. But the Marine brass disliked the concept and disbanded the units in 1944.

    The Marines were finally compelled to form dedicated special forces battalions 2003 by Special Forces-loving Rumsfeld defense department. In 2015, Marine special forces battalions were then integrated into a new Raider Regiment based at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina.

    The Raider Regiment counts three Raider battalions consisting of four companies. Each company has four fourteen-man teams called MSOTs. There’s also a Raider Support Group with three more battalions including specialist multi-purpose canine handlers, surveillance and forward observers.

    Raiders trainees undergo a three-stage screening, followed by a nine-month training program in skills ranging from demolitions, diving, foreign languages, close-quarters combat and wilderness survival. Raiders have been involved in actions ranging from brutal urban warfare against ISIS in Mosul, Iraq and Marawi in the Philippines, to counter-terror actions in Mali.

    Navy SEALs

    The U.S. Navy’s Sea, Air and Land (SEAL) teams have their origin in underwater demolitions teams assigned to scout out beaches and clear defensive obstacles ahead of amphibious landings in World War II ranging from Omaha Beach to the fortified island of Tarawa.

    The SEALS were officially formed in 1962 and were soon engaged in spy missions and riverine combat tasks in Vietnam, and participated in Operation Phoenix, a program to assassinate village leaders sympathetic to the Viet Cong.

    Later SEAL ops include securing the governor-general of Grenada in his palace, infiltrating Iraqi-occupied Kuwait City, and taking back oil tankers seized by pirates.

    Just to begin training, SEAL candidates must demonstrate extraordinary physical endurance. The over year-long training program spans topics ranging from airborne and diving operations as well as marksmanship and demolitions.

    But of those that pass initial screening, only one out of three make it through the initial physical conditioning unit, the third week of which is known as ‘Hell Week,” in which trainees perform 20 hours of intense physical activity per day.

    The basic SEAL unit is sixteen-man SEAL platoon, which sub-divide into two squads. The Navy has roughly 3,000 Navy SEALS in eight SEAL teams, each consisting of six platoons and three eight-person special task support units.

    Additionally, there are two sixteen-man SEAL Delivery Vehicle Teams equipped with specialized Mk.VIII Mod. 1 submersibles which can carry up to six SEALs for underwater insertion, and three teams operating small boats for littoral operations.

    DEVGRU

    The Naval Special Warfare Development Group (DEVGRU) is more popularly known by its former designation SEAL Team 6. Its operators are all experienced Navy SEALs who have undertaken an even more grueling training process with a 50 percent washout rate and occasional fatalities.

    Like the Army’s Delta Force, DEVGRU is a Tier 1 unit involved in counter-terrorism and preemptive assassination operations, famously including the killing of Osama Bin Laden in 2011. Unit members also specialize in hostage rescue and protect high-ranking individuals.

    DEVGRU is organized into four assault squadrons (Red, Gold, Blue and Silver); an over 100-strong sniper/advanced reconnaissance squadron (Black); a special boat squadron (Gray); and a training squadron (Green).

    Air Force Special Operations

    The Air Force has its own 15,000-person strong Special Operations Command, first formerly established in 1983. These involves a mix of aviation and commando-style units.

    Special Ops air wings fly a wide range of unique aircraft which often work closely with special forces units of other branches.

    Many of these fly variants of the venerable C-130 transport plane. For inserting and recovering commandos behind enemy lines there are MC-130 transport planes modified for low-altitude insertion and recovery and refueling helicopters, as well as CV-22 tilt-rotor aircraft.

    To provide long-endurance precision air support, there are ponderous but deadly “Spooky” gunship transports bristling with howitzers, Gatling guns and missiles. And to impede enemy communications and remotely detonated mines, there are EC-130H aircraft with powerful jammers.

    To map out just where hostiles are in the first place, AFSOCOM has a fleet of small U-28, C-145 and C-146 surveillance planes stuffed to the gills with hi-tech sensors used in low-profile spy flights across Africa and Southwest Asia alongside MQ-9 Reaper drone squadrons.

    Special Tactics Squadrons

    But there’s also a ground-pounding side to Air Force Special Ops in the form of Special Tactics Squadrons. These include specialists that are detached to support other special operations units.

    Air Force Combat Controllers help assess landing zones and airfields in remote, and perform traffic control in these austere conditions. Two-man Tactical Air Control Parties focus on directing air strikes in support of other ground forces. Pararescuemen, or PJs, assist in search-and-rescue missions behind enemy lines or difficult to access areas, as well as provide emergency medical care.

    There are even Special Operations Weathermen designed to assess weather conditions in the field that could impact the success of a mission.

    Most STSs are grouped under the the 24th Special Operations Wing, including the 24th STS, a Tier 1 unit that habitually embeds personnel with Delta Force and DEVGRU.

    Challenges for U.S. Special Forces
    Despite official secrecy, units like DEVGRU have been celebrated in press coverage and films like American Sniper, The Green Berets and Lone Survivor.

    But as special forces undertake a large share of military efforts in Afghanistan, Iraq, Libya, Mali and Syria, they are subject to being word down with near continuous combat deployments abroad

    Furthermore, despite the axiom that one “cannot mass produce special forces,” the ranks of U.S. operatives have more than doubled in size since 2001 in an effort to keep pace with demand.

    These stresses may be contributing to an institutional crisis. In the last few years, there have been several exposés of breakdowns in discipline and systemic misconduct in special forces units, ranging from the murder of a Green Beret in Mali by Navy SEALs and Marine Raiders in North Africa to reports that SEAL teams were exhibiting high rates of drug and alcohol abuse, and mishandling or even mutilating with hatchets the remains of enemy combatants.

    These scandals are leading for calls within the community to acknowledge the problem and reestablish standards and norms of conduct.

    Another challenge lies in the shifting priorities of the Defense Department. While SOCOM will likely remain at the forefront of future counter-terrorism/insurgency operations in Africa and West Asia, the Pentagon is reorienting itself away from such missions towards preparing for possible ‘great power’ conflict with Russia and China.

    Special Operations forces may thus develop new tactics on how their unique capabilities could counter Russia’s own unconventional warfare tactics in Eastern Europe, or employed to surveil and raid militarized islets in the Pacific Ocean.

  2. #2
    I'm here for the PJs, thought we were going to see some pajamas!
    ..,and whys that fella so fuzzy? You can't get a good seal with all that going on!

    :::Sorry. Off to peruse for content now, unless you're gonna break out this year's
    Line of jammies for my review.::::
    Thoughts are things. Thus I'm careful of the thoughts I think, & the company I keep.

  3. #3
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    Sorry, not pajamas. A different kind of party …

    https://www.military.com/military-fi...ce-para-rescue

    That Other's May Live - AF PJ's & First There - AF CCTs
    AF Special Tactics...
    /snip
    The wonder of our time isn’t how angry we are at politics and politicians; it’s how little we’ve done about it. - Fran Porretto
    -http://bastionofliberty.blogspot.com/2016/10/a-wholly-rational-hatred.html

  4. #4
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    Being an Air Force man, I am partial...

    I am, also, very impressed with ANYONE that goes into a hot zone with the intent to save life and not take it. I don't think I could do the job...

    Each episode is about 45 minutes long and they can all be found on youtube. I'm gonna only post a few for those without the bandwidth...

    Inside Combat Rescue Episode 1

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=prUCTIXNnAQ

    Inside Combat Rescue 02 Visions Of War

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PwECIKwz3lk

    Inside Combat Rescue, Into the Fire Episode 3

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RbyjUTPaa1A

    Inside Combat Rescue 05 Fog Of War

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=easmH3Pufp4

    20 minutes - US Air Force Pararescue training - Pararescue Indoctrination Course

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BKWbNiZo0so

    I really wish I could find a good documentary on the Air Force Combat Controllers... Now THAT is an AFSC I would have liked to try but I didn't even know they existed when I was in. The PJ's did recruit during BMTS, though, and after a 15 minute video showing what their job duties were they asked for volunteers. You could leave basic right at that point in time and enter training with them...'

    Oddly enough, even though most recruits hated basic training, no hands went up. In fact, I never knew anyone from any class who witnessed a hand being raised.
    Deo adjuvante non timendum - With God Helping, Nothing is to be Feared
    "You are like a pit-bull..." - Dennis Olson
    "No man knows but that the last backward glance over his shoulder may be his last look, forever." - Ernie Pyle Born: 1900 KIA: 1945 Shima, Okinawa

  5. #5
    Oh my. I want to meet the first man who thought eating oysters was wise, the first who drank civet (?) Pooped javabeans, and the first who dcided jumping out of a perfectly good plane made sense!

    Amazing fitness levels though, as per your link. What happens to these adrenaline junkies, though, I wonder?
    I admire from a distance, but am also inclined to great pity.

    Hopefully thats just a bunch of misconceptions on my part. As is, were it in my power my wish for them would be
    the ability to find contentment in ordinariness.
    ...not my monkeys, i guess.
    Thoughts are things. Thus I'm careful of the thoughts I think, & the company I keep.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by michaelteever View Post

    Challenges for U.S. Special Forces
    U.S. Special Forces are ONLY what are commonly called Green Berets, US Army Special Forces.

    All of the groups in the article are U.S. Special Operations (or USSO Forces) under USSOCOM.

    That is all.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by jward View Post
    Oh my. I want to meet the first man who thought eating oysters was wise, the first who drank civet (?) Pooped javabeans, and the first who dcided jumping out of a perfectly good plane made sense!

    Amazing fitness levels though, as per your link. What happens to these adrenaline junkies, though, I wonder?
    I admire from a distance, but am also inclined to great pity.

    Hopefully thats just a bunch of misconceptions on my part. As is, were it in my power my wish for them would be
    the ability to find contentment in ordinariness.
    ...not my monkeys, i guess.
    The adrenaline is a drug and a euphoric feeling you will miss for quite a while afterwards.

    I am in no way, shape, or form equating myself with these guys but I did a job for 25 years that saw me tussling in hand-to-hand situations with over 400 bad guys... That job was eliminated for me back in 2010 and I missed the action and camaraderie with my fellows in a way that I can only describe as withdrawal symptoms. Everything else fell short.

    I am now old enough that, 10 years later, I can say with all honesty that I could not do that job any longer and I am quite content where I am now.

    I can only imagine what these guys go through upon being discharged...
    Deo adjuvante non timendum - With God Helping, Nothing is to be Feared
    "You are like a pit-bull..." - Dennis Olson
    "No man knows but that the last backward glance over his shoulder may be his last look, forever." - Ernie Pyle Born: 1900 KIA: 1945 Shima, Okinawa

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by ArisenCarcass View Post
    U.S. Special Forces are ONLY what are commonly called Green Berets, US Army Special Forces.

    All of the groups in the article are U.S. Special Operations (or USSO Forces) under USSOCOM.

    That is all.
    Army guy?
    Deo adjuvante non timendum - With God Helping, Nothing is to be Feared
    "You are like a pit-bull..." - Dennis Olson
    "No man knows but that the last backward glance over his shoulder may be his last look, forever." - Ernie Pyle Born: 1900 KIA: 1945 Shima, Okinawa

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Ragnarok View Post
    The adrenaline is a drug and a euphoric feeling you will miss for quite a while afterwards.

    I am in no way, shape, or form equating myself with these guys but I did a job for 25 years that saw me tussling in hand-to-hand situations with over 400 bad guys... That job was eliminated for me back in 2010 and I missed the action and camaraderie with my fellows in a way that I can only describe as withdrawal symptoms. Everything else fell short.

    I am now old enough that, 10 years later, I can say with all honesty that I could not do that job any longer and I am quite content where I am now.

    I can only imagine what these guys go through upon being discharged...
    I'm glad you made it through to the other side. Too many don't. From time to time it hurts me to know that.

    ...now, how bout we go to preschool, for a moment, and I will ask an incredibly stupid ?..... Does AF just mean a bunch of folks trained to fight in those situations where you might be flown in, or do you each actually learn to pilot the darn things?
    Thoughts are things. Thus I'm careful of the thoughts I think, & the company I keep.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by jward View Post
    Does AF just mean a bunch of folks trained to fight in those situations where you might be flown in, or do you each actually learn to pilot the darn things?
    Are you talking about the PJ's?

    They undergo training as tough as anything any of the other special forces ( sorry, ARisenCarcass... I call them that for easy reference ) go through but they are first and foremost medics. Their career field was established in order to go in and extract pilots who were shot down behind enemy lines.

    They are a self sufficient unit, meaning they pilot their own helicopters, do their own fighting to get to the wounded and get them out, and are qualified to do almost any type of field ops to get the wounded person back to a surgical unit alive. The stress is just unreal... There is a thing called the "golden hour" which means that a person wounded in combat, if he can be delivered to a surgical unit alive and stabilized within that time, has something like a 75% chance of survival ( I may be off on the percentage ). So, just imagine that. You get the call for severely wounded soldiers... You have to get there, possibly under enemy fire, land, find the wounded, treat their injuries ( gunshots, limbs blown off, sucking chest wounds... The worst injuries man can inflict on man ), stabilize the wounded, fight your way back to the helicopter, and get them to the hospital alive... All within 60 minutes.

    If you miss that window, the wounded persons chance for survival drops to around 20%.

    THAT is some job pressure.

    Once they get through initial training ( called the "pipeline" ) they still undergo an additional 2 years training before being sent into the field.

    They are amazing people and there is no doubt in my mind I could not come close to that kind of dedication.
    Deo adjuvante non timendum - With God Helping, Nothing is to be Feared
    "You are like a pit-bull..." - Dennis Olson
    "No man knows but that the last backward glance over his shoulder may be his last look, forever." - Ernie Pyle Born: 1900 KIA: 1945 Shima, Okinawa

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ragnarok View Post
    Being an Air Force man, I am partial...

    I am, also, very impressed with ANYONE that goes into a hot zone with the intent to save life and not take it. I don't think I could do the job...

    Each episode is about 45 minutes long and they can all be found on youtube. I'm gonna only post a few for those without the bandwidth...

    Inside Combat Rescue Episode 1

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=prUCTIXNnAQ

    Inside Combat Rescue 02 Visions Of War

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PwECIKwz3lk

    Inside Combat Rescue, Into the Fire Episode 3

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RbyjUTPaa1A

    Inside Combat Rescue 05 Fog Of War

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=easmH3Pufp4

    20 minutes - US Air Force Pararescue training - Pararescue Indoctrination Course

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BKWbNiZo0so

    I really wish I could find a good documentary on the Air Force Combat Controllers... Now THAT is an AFSC I would have liked to try but I didn't even know they existed when I was in. The PJ's did recruit during BMTS, though, and after a 15 minute video showing what their job duties were they asked for volunteers. You could leave basic right at that point in time and enter training with them...'

    Oddly enough, even though most recruits hated basic training, no hands went up. In fact, I never knew anyone from any class who witnessed a hand being raised.
    I watched everyone of them. I hated when it went off. Kept me glued to the TV. But now I watch nothing but videos.
    🇺🇸T🇺🇸R🇺🇸U🇺🇸M🇺🇸P🇺🇸
    🇺🇸🇺🇸2🇺🇸0🇺🇸2🇺🇸0🇺🇸🇺🇸

  12. #12
    Step brother is a forward air controller, awarded the silver star due to a battle in Afghanistan. These guys are embedded with most if not every SF force deployed into a combat operation, as they make sure the air assets are in place and operating in unison to the men on the ground. A very high tech aspect to the battle on the ground. They train with all the other SF forces so they are on the same page, and can communicate in the same language, if you will. They are as tough as any SF guys, but in all reality, they are all tough as nails. RESPECT

    Thanks for your service Rag... was not aware. I see the withdrawl issues, and would trust the SF guys hand over fist to a regular grunt who decides to be a cop. SF guys are most likely to use their heads, while the regular grunts want to bust heads, it's what they do.....militarized police should concern everyone due to this dynamic.

  13. #13
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    PJ's. "Guardian" is a THINLY fictionalized version of training.

    I've talked to a couple Air Force Special Forces (usu referred to as securityservices [Chuck Noris was AFSF] and AF PJ's about Guardian. Yes they're coasties but the task is the same and the comments I got indicated that the training that Ashton Kutcher went through in Alaska in the film was VERY realistic.
    RULE 1:
    THEY want you DEAD.

    PERSEC OPSEC COMMSEC Live or Die by your Tradecraft.


    Should I vanish, only one person here will know.

    The BEST in Life:
    To CRUSH your enemies.
    To see them driven before you
    To listen to the lamentations of their women

  14. #14
    Thank you for the detailed information, and response, Ragnorak. I appreciated it.
    Thoughts are things. Thus I'm careful of the thoughts I think, & the company I keep.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ractivist View Post
    Thanks for your service Rag... was not aware.
    It ain't no thing...

    My Dad was a flight mechanic on the KC refueling planes in the Korean War. He gave up his spot to his best friend who only had one more flight to go before rotating back home. That plane crashed on takeoff and being full of jet fuel was engulfed in a huge fireball. Of course, no survivors. My Dad felt forever guilty for that as that was supposed to be his flight... Not being born came that close...

    My brother was in the Air Force.

    My Dad's brother was a medic at Pearl Harbor when it was attacked. He never spoke about it.

    My Mom's brother in law was a cook in the army and went to Anzio. He manned a machine gun nest when Nazi's overran his position and killed 18 of them for which he was awarded a silver star. He came home a broken man who had seen too much and there was no support services then. He went out behind the barn he had built and put a shotgun in his mouth. He had only been back about a year. My aunt ( my Mom's sister ) never remarried and lived in the house that he had built for them with his own hands until she died at age 94.

    It's just what my family does for this country we came to. My grandparents ( on my Mom's side ) were Volga Germans, Stalin did not trust them and gave them the option of joining the Russian army or being sent to the camps. They came to America with one trunk full of clothes which was lost when their ship mysteriously exploded and sunk off New York Harbor ( the official cause was a boiler explosion but a Nazi torpedo was also suspected ). They literally came her with nothing but the clothes they had on. My other set of grandparents were, also, German and came here to escape Hitler.

    My Dad was very proud of his service and wanted his sons to continue in that tradition. My dad has since passed but I was speaking with my Mom on the phone a few months ago and she felt she had to confess to me that back in high school ( I was pretty gifted in basketball and track ) they had been visited three times by a recruiter from the University of Wisconsin who wanted to offer me a scholarship to run sprints for them. I was planning on joining the Air Force after graduation and my Dad never told me ( and didn't let my Mom tell me ) about the visits.

    I'm not mad because I probably would have joined the military, anyway, but it is fun to think about... What if?

    Quote Originally Posted by jward View Post
    Thank you for the detailed information, and response, Ragnorak. I appreciated it.
    I hope it answered you question...

    I enjoy talking about that stuff.

    Deo adjuvante non timendum - With God Helping, Nothing is to be Feared
    "You are like a pit-bull..." - Dennis Olson
    "No man knows but that the last backward glance over his shoulder may be his last look, forever." - Ernie Pyle Born: 1900 KIA: 1945 Shima, Okinawa

  16. #16
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    the first who decided jumping out of a perfectly good plane made sense!

    Pilots decided that parachutes made wonderful sense since without one you went down with your plane and most time at terminal velocity....

    Texican....

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Texican View Post
    the first who decided jumping out of a perfectly good plane made sense!

    Pilots decided that parachutes made wonderful sense since without one you went down with your plane and most time at terminal velocity....

    Texican....
    See every single pilot shot down during WWI...
    Deo adjuvante non timendum - With God Helping, Nothing is to be Feared
    "You are like a pit-bull..." - Dennis Olson
    "No man knows but that the last backward glance over his shoulder may be his last look, forever." - Ernie Pyle Born: 1900 KIA: 1945 Shima, Okinawa

  18. #18
    That is kinda true and kinda NOT.

    The reason I say that is..... from everything I have seen (I just know people... I am not one of them) that while they are a part of US SOCM they maintain their branch identity...… for instance..... I know a SGM US ARMY DELTA, and was attached to the same Army Post that I was, ...……… He and I know personally the same Lt Gen Rt...… we were stationed at the same place, the same time, under the same General...… who was Post Commander... and then became something bigger...…. and I served under him there also...……….

    SGM in Delta kept his Army ID and Rank while in Delta, along with is new ID. That is because Delta IS ARMY.... it is the Army's MOST ELITE UNIT!

    Same is true for our two sons..... (and I will leave that right there)……

    as a side note, SGM still visits Gen... at his old post command house which I know exactly where it is...…. and I do miss that Gen very much... he was a good man, and his wife was a patriot as well, a Huge fan of soldiers...…

    Anyway...… I have a special place in my heart for all Mil types and especially spec op types....

    Thank you for what you do for me and us!

    Watchman2

    Quote Originally Posted by ArisenCarcass View Post
    U.S. Special Forces are ONLY what are commonly called Green Berets, US Army Special Forces.

    All of the groups in the article are U.S. Special Operations (or USSO Forces) under USSOCOM.

    That is all.
    Last edited by Watchman2; 10-21-2019 at 09:43 AM.
    NO MORE INFRINGEMENT.
    NO MORE COMPROMISE.
    NOT ONE MORE INCH.

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Watchman2 View Post
    SGM in Delta kept his Army ID and Rank while in Delta, along with is new ID. That is because Delta IS ARMY.... it is the Army's MOST ELITE UNIT!
    Delta's full name is United States Army SPECIAL FORCES Operational Detachment Delta (USA SFOD-D).

    Delta is "Special" Special Forces (Counterterrorism) drawn primarily from SF and Rangers.

  20. #20
    THANK YOU!!!!!!!!!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by ArisenCarcass View Post
    Delta's full name is United States Army SPECIAL FORCES Operational Detachment Delta (USA SFOD-D).

    Delta is "Special" Special Forces (Counterterrorism) drawn primarily from SF and Rangers.
    NO MORE INFRINGEMENT.
    NO MORE COMPROMISE.
    NOT ONE MORE INCH.

  21. #21
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    Waaay back when, while the earth was still cooling and I still worked for a living, the generic term for all service's special operations folks was SOF - special operations forces. That command structure was called SOCOM, the US Special Operations Command. The Army had USASOC, US Army Special Operations Command, which included Special Forces, Rangers, Psychological Operations and Civil Affairs. And IIRC there was a USASFC, a US Army Special Forces Command as well.

    And the people we don't talk about had JSOC, the Joint Special Operations Command.

    That's how it was after Goldwater-Nichols* opened the money floodgates on special operations and all of a sudden it was a cool thing to be in SOF and not a career limiter, especially of ossifers. And yes, I was there (as a useless civilian) before Goldwater-Nichols when Special Forces were still looked at as red-headed stepchildren by Big Green Army. I still think things were better then, too. Someone had to really WANT to be in SF in those days.

    *https://www.encyclopedia.com/history...er-nichols-act
    The wonder of our time isn’t how angry we are at politics and politicians; it’s how little we’ve done about it. - Fran Porretto
    -http://bastionofliberty.blogspot.com/2016/10/a-wholly-rational-hatred.html

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by ArisenCarcass View Post
    U.S. Special Forces are ONLY what are commonly called Green Berets, US Army Special Forces.

    All of the groups in the article are U.S. Special Operations (or USSO Forces) under USSOCOM.

    That is all.
    Glad somebody caught that. Like Little Green men, actual media research does not exist.

    RR
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    Stopped reading when the author insisted that Marine Raiders were still a thing.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by ibetiny View Post
    Stopped reading when the author insisted that Marine Raiders were still a thing.
    They are...

    Just under a different name, now.

    Deo adjuvante non timendum - With God Helping, Nothing is to be Feared
    "You are like a pit-bull..." - Dennis Olson
    "No man knows but that the last backward glance over his shoulder may be his last look, forever." - Ernie Pyle Born: 1900 KIA: 1945 Shima, Okinawa

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    16,984

    Air Force Special Tactics (24 SOW)

    Special Tactics Pararescue

    A Special Tactics pararescueman’s (PJ) primary function is to perform personnel recovery operations and provide battlefield emergency medical care within the special operations battlefield. A PJ’s unique technical rescue skill sets are utilized during humanitarian and combat operations; they deploy anywhere, anytime, employ air-land-sea tactics into restricted environments to authenticate, extract, treat, stabilize and evacuate injured or isolated personnel.

    Their motto "That Others May Live" reaffirms the pararescueman's commitment to saving lives and self-sacrifice. Without PJs, thousands of service members and civilians would have been lost in past conflicts and natural disasters.

    Operations

    Pararescuemen are embedded with Special Operations Command assets to provide personnel recovery capability and life-saving medical treatment as expert combat medical professionals in hostile environments. Approximately 40 percent of pararescuemen are in special operations and receive additional special operations training to better support teammates in the U.S. Navy SEALs and U.S. Army Special Forces.

    Pararescuemen are among the most highly trained tactical rescue and emergency trauma specialists in the U.S. military. They must maintain an Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic qualification throughout their careers. With this medical and rescue expertise, along with their deployment capabilities, PJs are able to perform life-saving rescue missions in the world's most remote areas. PJs do all this, with the intensity of a special operations mission set.

    Capabilities

    Pararescuemen provide emergency and life-saving services for the most dangerous missions the U.S. military performs and frequently deploy with U.S. Navy SEALs and Army Special Forces.

    They are trained to shoot, move, and communicate alongside other special operations forces, while also saving lives with their rescue techniques and medical expertise. PJs specialize in search and recovery dives, swift water rescue, confined space rescue, high-angle rescue and DNA and classified material gathering.

    'That Others May Live’

    Pararescue became necessary during World War II, and has since been a constant part of U.S. military heritage and the Air Force mission.

    The history of pararescue began in August of 1943, when 21 U.S. military members bailed out of a disabled C-46 over an uncharted jungle near the China-Burma border. The crash site was so remote that the only means of getting help to the survivors was by paradrop. Lt. Col. Don Fleckinger and two medical corpsmen volunteered for the assignment. This paradrop of medical corpsmen was the seed from which the concept of pararescue was born. For a month these men, aided by natives, cared for the injured until the party was brought to safety.

    This event made the need for a highly trained rescue force clear, and thus pararescue as we know it was created. Rescues since then have occurred in virtually every corner of the world.

    The Air Force awarded nineteen Air Force Crosses to enlisted personnel during the South East Asian conflict; ten of the nineteen were awarded to PJs. PJs provided medical treatment for injured and wounded men picked up from the jungles.

    General John P. McConnell, then Air Force Chief of Staff, approved the wearing of the maroon beret. The beret symbolizes the blood sacrificed by fellow pararescuemen and their devotion to duty by aiding others in distress. PJs live up to their motto: "That Others May Live.”

    Training

    Pararescuemen endure some of the toughest training offered in the U.S. military. Their training, as well as their unique mission, earns them the right to wear the maroon beret. Some of their unique training includes:

    Indoctrination Course, Lackland AFB, Texas
    -- This nine-week course recruits, selects and trains future PJs through extensive physical conditioning. Training accomplished at this course includes physiological training, obstacle course, marches, dive physics, dive tables, metric manipulations, medical terminology, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, weapons qualifications, PJ history and leadership reaction course.

    U.S. Army Airborne School, Fort Benning, Ga.
    -- Trainees learn the basic parachuting skills required to infiltrate an objective area by static line airdrop in a three-week course.

    U.S. Air Force Combat Diver School, Panama City, Fla. -- Trainees become combat divers, learning to use scuba and closed-circuit diving equipment to covertly infiltrate denied areas, conduct sub-surface searches and basic recovery operations. The six-week course provides training to depths of 130 feet, stressing development of maximum underwater mobility under various operating conditions.

    U.S. Navy Underwater Egress Training, Pensacola Naval Air Station, Fla.
    -- This course teaches how to safely escape from an aircraft that has ditched in the water. The one-day instruction includes principles, procedures and techniques necessary to get out of a sinking aircraft.

    U.S. Air Force Basic Survival School, Fairchild AFB, Wash.
    -- This two-and-a half-week course teaches basic survival techniques for remote areas. Instruction includes principles, procedures, equipment and techniques, which enable individuals to survive, regardless of climatic conditions or unfriendly environments and return home.

    U.S. Army Military Free Fall Parachutist School, Fort Bragg, N.C., and Yuma Proving Grounds, Ariz. -- This course instructs trainees in free fall parachuting procedures. The five-week course provides wind tunnel training, in-air instruction focusing on student stability, aerial maneuvers, air sense and parachute opening procedures.

    Paramedic Course, Kirtland AFB, N.M.
    -- This 22-week course teaches how to manage trauma patients prior to evacuation and provide emergency medical treatment. Upon graduation, an EMT-Paramedic certification is awarded through the National Registry.

    Pararescue Recovery Specialist Course, Kirtland AFB, N.M. -- Qualifies airmen as pararescue recovery specialists for assignment to any pararescue unit worldwide. The 24-week training includes field medical care and extrication basics, field tactics, mountaineering, combat tactics, advanced parachuting and helicopter insertion/extraction.

    Special Tactics Training Squadron, Hurlburt Field, Fla. -- During this specialize course for PJs going through initial training to special operations, Airmen receive five-level training, including infiltration, exfiltration methods and additional combat training.

    https://www.airforcespecialtactics.a...ST-Pararescue/
    🇺🇸T🇺🇸R🇺🇸U🇺🇸M🇺🇸P🇺🇸
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  26. #26
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    22,802
    Quote Originally Posted by Ragnarok View Post
    Are you talking about the PJ's?

    They undergo training as tough as anything any of the other special forces ( sorry, ARisenCarcass... I call them that for easy reference ) go through but they are first and foremost medics. Their career field was established in order to go in and extract pilots who were shot down behind enemy lines.

    They are a self sufficient unit, meaning they pilot their own helicopters, do their own fighting to get to the wounded and get them out, and are qualified to do almost any type of field ops to get the wounded person back to a surgical unit alive. The stress is just unreal... There is a thing called the "golden hour" which means that a person wounded in combat, if he can be delivered to a surgical unit alive and stabilized within that time, has something like a 75% chance of survival ( I may be off on the percentage ). So, just imagine that. You get the call for severely wounded soldiers... You have to get there, possibly under enemy fire, land, find the wounded, treat their injuries ( gunshots, limbs blown off, sucking chest wounds... The worst injuries man can inflict on man ), stabilize the wounded, fight your way back to the helicopter, and get them to the hospital alive... All within 60 minutes.

    If you miss that window, the wounded persons chance for survival drops to around 20%.

    THAT is some job pressure.

    Once they get through initial training ( called the "pipeline" ) they still undergo an additional 2 years training before being sent into the field.

    They are amazing people and there is no doubt in my mind I could not come close to that kind of dedication.
    I think if the wounded are gotten to a surgical unit, survival rate is in the 90s, but the stats are not static. Medicine is advancing all the time.

    The dustoff pilots are a wonderfully dedicated group. RIP, Ed Freeman.
    "Freedom is not something to be secured in any one moment of time. We must struggle to preserve it every day. And freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction."
    -Ronald Reagan

  27. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by ibetiny View Post
    Stopped reading when the author insisted that Marine Raiders were still a thing.
    As I understand it (I only deployed with Marines) Marine Special Operations were under MARSOC and have been renamed as Raiders to belie the new nature of the "special Marines."
    I believe they are currently called MARSOC Raiders.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marine_Raider_Regiment

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