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ECON Here's The Real Reason Why America's Seniors Won't Retire
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  1. #1
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    Here's The Real Reason Why America's Seniors Won't Retire

    A bit of a surprise, but only a bit. Not hard to see why retirees don't mind a few hours of work in their week as a way to bring in some extra dough and keep their collective saws sharp; I actually empathize on this one. If you don't have projects of your own already, you'll likely want for something to keep your mind going.

    Loads of charts and graphs at the link.

    Fair use cited so on and so forth.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/personal-f...rs-wont-retire

    Here's The Real Reason Why America's Seniors Won't Retire

    by Tyler Durden
    Tue, 10/08/2019 - 21:45

    Forget about millennials working until they die. As we've repeatedly reported, there's a far more pressing retirement crisis gripping America. And it's the unprecedented number of contemporary workers of retirement age who are putting it off. Some are still reeling from losses during the financial crisis. Others never had enough socked away to begin with, and didn't start paying attention to their situation until it was too late.



    Seniors have many reasons for lingering in the workforce, either part-time or full-time, until after the age of 66 (the age at which American citizens can start receiving full Social Security benefits). In an attempt to learn more about the reasons seniors often delay retirement, Provision Living commissioned a study asking seniors about why they're delaying retirement.

    As it turns out, overwhelmingly, seniors decide to stay in the workforce after being eligible for social security for financial reasons. Though some claim they're still working for personal reasons like boredom or because they still enjoy working. According to the survey, it's a 60% to 40% split.




    For those who are still working, a slight majority say they're only working part-time, vs. full time. The average age of switching from full- to part-time? 61.



    Out of the seniors who are still working, a whopping 47% said they wish they were retired. Another 33% said they were happy still working, while another 20% said they're happy to work, but would like fewer hours.



    Much more shocking is the average retirement savings of seniors who are still working: $133,108 - far less than the roughly $2 million people of retirement age are supposed to have socked away to ensure they won't run out of money at the end of their life. And that's for college-educated retirees.

    Average retirement savings for non-college-educated seniors is just $80,221.



    Surprisingly, when it comes to retirement income, an equal percentage of respondents said they're relying on a 401k as pension-related payouts.



    For many, retirement is the ultimate reward after a lifetime of work. But if the baby boomers who are just reaching retirement age are struggling, just imagine what these numbers might look like when the millennial generation reaches retirement age.

  2. #2
    Why? Once the Seniors, leave the Millennials will really fudge things up.

  3. #3
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    Get your house paid off, homestead it and put your money where the hospitals can't get it. Screw the statistics and enjoy life.
    "When law and morality contradict each other, the citizen has the cruel alternative of either losing his moral sense or losing his respect for the law." ~ Frederic Bastiilt

    "Duty is ours; results are God's."

  4. #4
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    "Retirement" is a false narrative and concept created during the FDR era. What the reality was is that the industrialists needed older, more expensive workers moved out and younger, cheaper workers moved in. Even the unions went along with this bit of dark comedy.

    Previous to that "retirement" was merely a word that meant you moved from a young workers job to an old workers job. Even back to Biblical times the priests didn't "retire." They changed jobs, they didn't just go live in the old priests home or go back to "civilian life" and work the vineyards.

    Seriously, people really need to stop believing in the lies the progs and dems have been foisting on our country for too many decades. Even the wealthy that "retire" are still working through investing, etc. What you work at is all that changes, and all that should. For those with Christian beliefs the Bible says if you don't work then you don't eat … and that doesn't only cover the entitlement minded in any given population.
    Find my free fiction stories here.

    "Isn’t it interesting that the same people who laugh at science fiction listen to weather forecasts and economists?” - Kelvin R. Throop III

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by SSTemplar View Post
    Get your house paid off, homestead it and put your money where the hospitals can't get it. Screw the statistics and enjoy life.
    Yep

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doat View Post
    Why? Once the Seniors, leave the Millennials will really fudge things up.
    THAT has already been long since happening...
    Somewhere in the clouds, Your peak is shining, Have courage and go
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sc_cqbxF0cg

  7. #7
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    Saw a lady, must have been 70ish, stocking shelves at Walmart here in Canada...... she used a cane to walk slowly and couldn't reach the top shelf. Could hardly push the stock cart and she hung the cane on the side. I really wanted to help her, felt so sorry for her situation. A younger woman kept her eye on her and helped a bit.

    Maybe Walmart was helping her supplement her income and doing her a favor by hiring a definite Senior, but I can't see her doing that if she had no choice.
    True North Strong and Free

  8. #8
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    I like working, and don't plan on traditional retirement. I'm not a piddle around the yard kind of person, and I miss work on long weekends.
    Patriot Guard rider
    www.patriotguard.org

  9. #9
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    until after the age of 66 (the age at which American citizens can start receiving full Social Security benefits)

    That is a lie. It’s 67 for me, and even later for younger folks.

  10. #10
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    I retired at 62 and never looked back. At 63 I moved to the woods on land that belonged to some in my family. I own almost 12 acres and have homestead exemption which means no property taxes. I lived in a FEMA camper for several years with a 32' school bus for storage and in case something happened to my camper. I did fine on my small income with a small savings for emergencies. But I was willing to live on a very small scale. This place is my little piece of heaven on earth. I'm very blessed. I get all my health care from the VA at no cost to me, I'm service connected but 0%.

    Judy

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by nomifyle View Post
    I retired at 62 and never looked back. At 63 I moved to the woods on land that belonged to some in my family. I own almost 12 acres and have homestead exemption which means no property taxes. I lived in a FEMA camper for several years with a 32' school bus for storage and in case something happened to my camper. I did fine on my small income with a small savings for emergencies. But I was willing to live on a very small scale. This place is my little piece of heaven on earth. I'm very blessed. I get all my health care from the VA at no cost to me, I'm service connected but 0%.

    Judy
    Wow, that's nice. We have a homestead exemption in Michigan too, but it's not a COMPLETE exemption. It's just a significantly lower rate.

  12. #12
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    I'm curious to find out how many other states let seniors off the hook for property taxes. I'm in Michigan and like Blacknarwhal said it is not a complete exemption. In fact it isn't just for seniors. Anyone who lives full time in their home can get the homestead exemption. As far as I know, in Michigan, you pay property taxes till you die!

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by ShyGirl View Post
    I'm curious to find out how many other states let seniors off the hook for property taxes. I'm in Michigan and like Blacknarwhal said it is not a complete exemption. In fact it isn't just for seniors. Anyone who lives full time in their home can get the homestead exemption. As far as I know, in Michigan, you pay property taxes till you die!
    No property taxes at all for Mississippi. I think we stopped paying them when DH turned 65. No state or federal income tax, either, unless you make over a certain amount a year.
    Sherree

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by ShyGirl View Post
    I'm curious to find out how many other states let seniors off the hook for property taxes. I'm in Michigan and like Blacknarwhal said it is not a complete exemption. In fact it isn't just for seniors. Anyone who lives full time in their home can get the homestead exemption. As far as I know, in Michigan, you pay property taxes till you die!
    I'm not off the hook for property taxes because I'm a senior. Louisiana has homestead exemption up to $75,000. My homestead consists of an old older mobile home and several out buildings, so it does not add up to much.

    I remember a fellow I worked with in New Orleans that lived in Mississippi and he said he would not have to pay property taxes when he turned 65.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Olson View Post
    until after the age of 66 (the age at which American citizens can start receiving full Social Security benefits)

    That is a lie. It’s 67 for me, and even later for younger folks.
    A lot of people don't seem to get this part. This is your reality if you were born after 1960. And if they do what they've threatened to a couple of times, and push full retirement off until age 70, a lot of people are going to be wondering what the frick happened to their "retirement" plans.
    Find my free fiction stories here.

    "Isn’t it interesting that the same people who laugh at science fiction listen to weather forecasts and economists?” - Kelvin R. Throop III

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by ShyGirl View Post
    I'm curious to find out how many other states let seniors off the hook for property taxes. I'm in Michigan and like Blacknarwhal said it is not a complete exemption. In fact it isn't just for seniors. Anyone who lives full time in their home can get the homestead exemption. As far as I know, in Michigan, you pay property taxes till you die!
    Florida gives an extra exemption but given the property values in most of the state, it only helps if you live in a shack.
    Find my free fiction stories here.

    "Isn’t it interesting that the same people who laugh at science fiction listen to weather forecasts and economists?” - Kelvin R. Throop III

  17. #17
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    Here is a pdf I found that has a chart for each state.
    Attached Files

  18. #18
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    Note: The pdf is as of 2015.

  19. #19
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    I'm still pumping iron at the gym and as long as I can do that and remain in top shape I will continue to work in the office as well....

    ....I figure the day I can't go lift in the gym anymore is the day I'm done working........

    ....I'm 65 and work around a bunch of guys in their 20's which keeps me young and they all kind of lean on me for advise (professional and personal) which I enjoy sharing with them.............

    As a single guy with really no social life its fine by me to keep working in the environment I'm in......(my girl friend took up most of that social time over the past decade but she is now out the area in a nursing home with ALS)

    BTW.....my info on SS shows that I wouldn't reach max payout until I was 70 years old............

  20. #20
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    Here is Florida 100% disabled vets are exempt from property tax.
    I believe that 100% service connected disability for LEOs also exempts them from property tax.

    Also seniors over 65, whose property is worth less than 250K and whose total household income is less than around 26K are exempt from propterty tax.
    “I never saw a wild thing sorry for itself. A small bird will drop frozen dead from a bough without ever having felt sorry for itself.”
    D. H. Lawrence

  21. Why? Once the Seniors, leave the Millennials will really fudge things up
    Worse than we have?

    I went out at 63 in 2013. It was either retire or squeeze the boss' neck until his eyes popped out.
    Since then, I have been called back a half dozen times because they can't get anyone to stay longer than 6-8 months

  22. #22
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    I went on SS at 62. I was caregiver for my husband till he died, then went back to work at 65. I'm now 66 and have no plans to really retire. I drive a school bus which gives me money to go play. I have a 'horse habit'. I do Cowboy Mounted Shooting among other horse related activities and it isn't cheap to do. Plus it is my social life. Living alone with no outside contact would drive me insane.

  23. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Kathy in FL View Post
    "Retirement" is a false narrative and concept created during the FDR era. What the reality was is that the industrialists needed older, more expensive workers moved out and younger, cheaper workers moved in.
    Well, that . . . and . . . many jobs of that era were physically demanding upon a slowly fading older body - the youngsters had the physical stamina and energy, sans the arthritis/joint/spinal and other debilitating physical conditions that would typically impinge upon an older worker's ability to remain profitable/capable.


    intothegoodnight
    Last edited by intothatgoodnight; 10-09-2019 at 12:51 PM.
    "Do not go gentle into that good night.
    Rage, rage against the dying of the light."

    — Dylan Thomas, "Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night"

  24. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Laurane View Post
    Saw a lady, must have been 70ish, stocking shelves at Walmart here in Canada...... she used a cane to walk slowly and couldn't reach the top shelf. Could hardly push the stock cart and she hung the cane on the side. I really wanted to help her, felt so sorry for her situation. A younger woman kept her eye on her and helped a bit.

    Maybe Walmart was helping her supplement her income and doing her a favor by hiring a definite Senior, but I can't see her doing that if she had no choice.

    Have witnessed similar elderly Walmart workers with very obvious physical limitations, stocking shelves.

    Agree - rough, for those with debilitating physical conditions.


    intothegoodnight
    "Do not go gentle into that good night.
    Rage, rage against the dying of the light."

    — Dylan Thomas, "Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night"

  25. #25
    My answer to the question "Here's The Real Reason Why America's Seniors Won't Retire" is inflation.

    The cost of everything, not value is rising every year.

    NW

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by SSTemplar View Post
    Get your house paid off, homestead it and put your money where the hospitals can't get it. Screw the statistics and enjoy life.
    What do you mean homestead it?

  27. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by northern watch View Post
    My answer to the question "Here's The Real Reason Why America's Seniors Won't Retire" is inflation.

    The cost of everything, not value, is rising every year.
    Correct - glad you brought this into the discussion.


    intothegoodnight
    "Do not go gentle into that good night.
    Rage, rage against the dying of the light."

    — Dylan Thomas, "Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night"

  28. #28
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    Those that do not take early SS retirement are losing money if even working....

    If you will receive full SS benefits at 70, just how many think that SS will be here in 1 year, 2 years, 5 years or even longer????

    The DW and I both took early retirement at 62.... Will have to live to 77 and SS will still have to be around for the SS payments to breakeven, then we would get more on SS if we retired at the maximum SS payment.... 77 is 8 years out for me and 10 years out for the DW....

    Being self employed even thru a closely held S corporation we pay 15.3% on my income.... FICA at 6.2% & MCare at 1.45% times 2 for a total of 15.3% of my income which comes out of our overall income....

    Take early retirement for you can still work and have the extra income to do what you wish to do with it including preparing....

    The choice is yours....

    Texican....

  29. #29
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    I got the H. out when I was 59, but that was because my parents were in such rough shape, and I had enough years in to be able to collect enough of a pension to scrape by on until Social Security at 62.

    NEVER regretted it a day. At a certain point, your time left on this planet is worth WAY more than money. When that day hits ya, you will KNOW. Yes, I could have continued to contribute at my former workplace, and I was sitting in the catbird seat, because nobody wanted me to leave. Reality bites. Millennial cock-ups were the alternative future. Haha. They still beg me to come back. Not a chance. Life is good. I have my volunteer "job" for about 8-9 months of the year when the weather is decent, and I'm using skills/knowledge there that I developed on my own over the years from one of my passions/hobbies. Haha. They'd hire me in a minute, too if I wanted a real job.

    Instead, like today...my time is my own. There's a list a mile long of things to do here before winter, but since this is gonna be the last nice day for at least 3-4 days, and maybe 'til spring, I decided to take off for about a 300 mile loop tour of the North Shore and inland almost to the Canadian border today. Glorious weather...65-70 degrees depending on elevation/how close to Lake Superior, and the leaves and tamarack trees were at their height of color. This was right after having a 7:00 am breakfast/meetup/gabfest with my old workmates. Then, as I was passing the place that I volunteer, my supervisor there called me to see if I was coming in to work this week, or if I was done for the season. Done for the season! Will stop in once a month for some routine maintenance, but no more worries about regular arrangements until spring. Again...life is GOOD!

    Sitting here catching up on the news, nipping into the BEST hand-smoked salmon crafted on this planet from a little North Shore place I called upon on my way home.
    Get out as soon as you can.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Texican View Post
    Those that do not take early SS retirement are losing money if even working....
    Be careful of this advice.

    If you are on O-Care and getting a subsidy then taking SS early could raise your income up high enough that you lose subsidy and end up having to pay the full healthcare bill costing you whatever you gained by taking the SS

    Also, and I do not know the exact rules, but if you take SS while still working and are less then 65 the SS payments could be more heavily taxed

    I retired last year at 57. For me unless there is a drastic change in the health care system then it would actually cost me money to take SS prior to going onto medicare at 65. But if necessary you should talk to an adviser for your financial situation.

    tbd

  31. #31
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    Much more shocking is the average retirement savings of seniors who are still working: $133,108 - far less than the roughly $2 million people of retirement age are supposed to have socked away to ensure they won't run out of money at the end of their life. And that's for college-educated retirees.

    Average retirement savings for non-college-educated seniors is just $80,221.
    After working 44 years I retired at 64 with a life savings of $2000.

  32. #32
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    Unless one has money to invest, $2 million is an impossible dream. Notice they stated 'college-educated'...us blue collar people have no such luck...
    A socialist will trample over one hundred poor people just for the chance to throw a rock at a rich man.

  33. #33
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    I went out on disability at age 57. I spent the next 10 years ramping down. Yes, it took that long. I was a type A, burn-out. I can see now that I would not have made it to my current age. I was heavily medicated for most of that decade. Fortunately, it was during the Obama years. I have attempted a few jobs in the last 3 years. Did not work out. My body gave out on one, in the other I could feel myself ramping back up. Did the smart thing early this time. My hobbies from back then became my passions. I do some volunteer work. The Veterans' Benefits have saved my ass. The VA medical care is uneven, but there. The VA Disability Compensation is fickle, but shows up. I had a 2nd cousin who retired early from a company that was bought out, many years ago. When I asked him how he like it, he said "There is always the possibility of earning more money; there is no possibility of more time." Similar to as stated above. I do not have the retirement I had wanted. I actually have something better.....it is adequate.
    My Mate Winston

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Countrybumpkin View Post
    Unless one has money to invest, $2 million is an impossible dream. Notice they stated 'college-educated'...us blue collar people have no such luck...
    And manages to land the right investment, too. I mean, seriously; these days investments are a potential disaster. How long before Johnny Fed starts plundering 401Ks and IRAs?

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Disciple View Post
    After working 44 years I retired at 64 with a life savings of $2000.

    How???

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by SSTemplar View Post
    Get your house paid off, homestead it and put your money where the hospitals can't get it. Screw the statistics and enjoy life.
    Amen! I retired in March, finished paying off our home and am now living a dream. It’s almost like being rich. Did you ever wonder how it feels to the super rich who never have to work?
    Well retirement is like that. No, I don’t have massive bucks to spend, but I have a roof, enough SS to pay my monthly bills and a little extra to travel with. On my way to Colorado now to see my grandkids. All this and I don’t have to go to work. My time and energy go towards the things that make me happy.
    We live in a time of conflict - external and internal - when we sometimes concentrate too much on what divides us. Today, fly the Stars and Stripes with pride and confidence that what unites is far stronger.
    Charlie Dent

  37. #37
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    Had to start over at 59. What was left of my pension after PBGC cut it is less than half of what SS is supposed to be. With DW's health issues I can not dump her on medicare.
    Right now I am on the 'carry-out' plan at work. My life insurance from work is the only way she will get by in my absence. I am trying to figure a way I can cut back at 72 and still keep insurance. I have already lived longer than my father so it is all in Gods hands.

    Shadow
    "18 The wrath of God is being revealed from heaven against all the godlessness and wickedness of people, who suppress the truth by their wickedness… 21 For although they knew God, they neither glorified him as God nor gave thanks to him, but their thinking became futile and their foolish hearts were darkened… 24 Therefore God gave them over in the sinful desires of their hearts…" Romans 1:18-32

  38. #38
    As I have ranted many times, as a young person I never knew anybody that retired. The store keeper gives the store to the son, he comes back to stock shelves, make change etc.

    Farmers moved to town and every day back on the farm to help the 'kid'.

    Town banker at 90 yrs was still coming in, his son 65 had retired, he came in too, his son was running it. The old geezers handled investments. The 90 yr old was sharper than most.

    I did not see retirees until I was about 30-35 yrs old. They started going to Arizona for the winter.
    "The misfortune of many is the consolation of fools" Ancient proverb

  39. #39
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    A friend had the best idea. He said we should start retired and then work from 40 on.

    Shadow
    "18 The wrath of God is being revealed from heaven against all the godlessness and wickedness of people, who suppress the truth by their wickedness… 21 For although they knew God, they neither glorified him as God nor gave thanks to him, but their thinking became futile and their foolish hearts were darkened… 24 Therefore God gave them over in the sinful desires of their hearts…" Romans 1:18-32

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blacknarwhal View Post
    I mean, seriously; these days investments are a potential disaster. How long before Johnny Fed starts plundering 401Ks and IRAs?
    I respectfully disagree

    Investing is the only way to acquire wealth for normal folks. Either the stock market or real estate which are the 2 big ones normal folks invest in you have to take risk if you want to get a head.

    There are always good investments in the stock market. But investing isn't a 1 year thing it has to be done over a lifetime starting when you are young and continuing past when you retire. Try to buy a couple of good quality blue chip dividend paying companies when you first start working. Let the dividends reinvest and compound and continue to buy more stock each month. Buy the time you retire you will be sitting on a good nest egg that can provide you dividend income so that you never have to actually sell your stock. And when you do die your stock portfolio can be passed to your heirs providing them with that much more of a boost

    As an example consider Johnson & Johnson. If you bought 1 share of JNJ each month for about $100 a share in 30 years you would have bought 360 shares. Each share currently pays $3.80 a share in dividends. I'm not doing to work the math for the compounding of the dividends you reinvested each of those 30 years so lets just say you end up with 400 shares. If the stock price and the dividend were to never change your 400 shares would currently be worth about $50k paying you $1500 a year in dividends. But a good company like JNJ raises its dividend each year so after 30 years expect the dividend per share to be multiples higher then it current is. That's just from an investment of $100 a month in one stock. Expand that to more then 1 stock to say 5, 10 or more. You invest more money each month as your income grows. Soon you will be talking serious money

    TB2k started as a prepper forum. This is prepping

    tbd

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