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FARM Why no harvesting?
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
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    Why no harvesting?

    I drove across Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana and Ohio along I-70. More than 99% of the corn (maize pronounced my'zuh) fields have not been harvested. The stalks and leaves are brown in most of the fields and only a few had any green on the stalks/leaves.

    Are the farmers holding out for corn prices to rise? There were many fields not planted because of the flooding and the April and May snow storms in the mid-west.
    "Approach with a calm resolve, attack with reckless indifference." Gladius Republicae!
    "...use gold like it's gunpowder..."

    Train and be ready, for that day will come!

  2. #2
    Only a guess because I haven't been following the weather in that area, but the grain is probably too wet to cut. It can look ready and actually be ready but if it contains too much moisture it won't thresh well and the elevator doesn't want it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2001
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    Central Iowa
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    They've been holding out because of the rain. They are about 28 days behind. Today and tomorrow will see a ton of work because it's been dry.

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Beaverland
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    Most of the Midwest suffered truly MASSIVE FLOOD DAMAGE in the spring and summer of 2019. For example, Nebraska had ONE MILLION COWS DROWNED. Entire states were unable to plant soybeans, corn among other thing.

    Yep, we are going to be looking at staggering price increases on food over the next year or so. And then Grand Solar Minimum really starts to kick in. If you haven't already stockpiled months/years of food you are in trouble.
    Doomer Doug, a.k.a. Doug McIntosh now has a blog at www.doomerdoug.wordpress.com
    My end of the world e book "Day of the Dogs" is available for sale at the following url
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
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    MN
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    2,627
    Many of the crops were planted late. They are waiting for the corn to dry down as much as possible in the field so they don't have to use as much propane to finish drying it. In some areas the fields are too wet to get into to harvest.

    In our area they are just now starting soybeans, probably two weeks later than usual.
    Was known as dairyfarmer but sold the cows.

  6. #6
    talking with my neighbors, just waiting for the corn to dry out more,

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
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    Columbia River Gorge
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    If I could figure out a way to package up "dry", I could send them enough to fix the moisture issue.
    We are extremely dry for this time of year.

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    Sometimes corn and maize sits in the field way into December. Once it matures they wait until it reaches the proper moisture before picking.
    "They wanted to be left alone to face challenges head-on, and to prosper from their own hard work and ingenuity...harsh country tends to produce strong people."-John Erickson

  9. #9
    Yup. What they said ∆
    Thoughts are things. Thus I'm careful of the thoughts I think, & the company I keep.
    She couldn't keep her colors inside the lines, so she drew new lines.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
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    17,243
    That's the story in Michigan too. Some harvesting has occurred, but some is waiting due to moisture and late planting.

  11. #11

    If possible drying in field is preferable

    Drying after uses lots of propane and that is money lost.

    Plus with very wet early spring a lot of fields either went in late in Ohio or might be replants.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
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    SE Kansas
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    288
    In many places the ground is just too wet to hold up the combine. My son works for a farmer and they have 80 acres left and just can't get it done.

  13. #13
    Join Date
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    West Virginia
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    There may be some cold weather coming for some of these states and Snow is in the works and that may kill any chances of getting the crop in.

  14. #14
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    I'm in mid Missouri and they are combining like crazy. Almost all the corn is out and they are starting on beans. Which is early for beans.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    May 2004
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    N. Minnesota
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    Here in Minnesota....too much rain and late planting. I have a friend traveling down into Minnesota farm country to visit his parents this weekend, and he promised he would give me a report when he gets back next week. But here, the rivers are at their banks....the ground is totally saturated.

  16. #16
    The more corn drys on the stalk the less they use heat in silos to dry it, plus it needs to have dropped to certain moisture content ranges to make it feed and not gum up combines.

    It is a contest between dry enough ear and still strong stalks not blow down as to getting it out of the fields.

    I suspect they will try to gouge up prices even with full silos, just like the dam oil companies keep gas up or if they do lower it the dam govt slaps tax on it to loot more.

    I'm not selling the open pollinated corn we put up until all my storage is full. May be grinding meal and selling extra local just like other small farmers might.

    It's the city folk that are gonna potentially face some serious shortage or price hikes.
    Dosadi

    III


    My family & clan are my country.

  17. #17
    Corns not ready, it’s a bit early for it. Many of the farmers around here just finished chopping their high moisture corn a few weeks ago. Here in Great Lakes Ohio it’s bean harvest time, and we are in full swing. DH took his first field of beans off last weekend, and the rest of it is close behind, it was planted later.

  18. #18
    Expect prices for groceries to go up. We had the shortest growing season in my lifetime. Late spring, cold summers, and early falls make for horrible harvests.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Locally here in West Virginia we have Corn and Soy Bean still in the field and most of the coin is quite tall this year but most of it the top 1/3 stalk of it is still green.
    We just go some much needed rain and the tempertures are cooling off to fall ramps and this can slow down the drying out process. Overall locally it looks like they will have a good Corn havest this year.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
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    Mississippi
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    3,594
    In my AO, the corn and soy beans have been harvested. Looks like the farmers had a great crop. Cotton is the only thing left in the fields, but it's still a bit early for it to be harvested.
    Sherree

  21. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Doomer Doug View Post
    Most of the Midwest suffered truly MASSIVE FLOOD DAMAGE in the spring and summer of 2019. For example, Nebraska had ONE MILLION COWS DROWNED. Entire states were unable to plant soybeans, corn among other thing.

    Yep, we are going to be looking at staggering price increases on food over the next year or so. And then Grand Solar Minimum really starts to kick in. If you haven't already stockpiled months/years of food you are in trouble.
    I posted a documentary film on this in the Earth Changes room. Go have a look, and bring tissues, it's grim.

    http://www.timebomb2000.com/vb/showt...-Nebraska-2019
    Don't be dismayed by goodbyes. A farewell is necessary before you can meet again. And meeting again, after moments or lifetimes, is certain for those who are friends. --Richard Bach

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doomer Doug View Post
    Most of the Midwest suffered truly MASSIVE FLOOD DAMAGE in the spring and summer of 2019. For example, Nebraska had ONE MILLION COWS DROWNED. Entire states were unable to plant soybeans, corn among other thing.

    Yep, we are going to be looking at staggering price increases on food over the next year or so. And then Grand Solar Minimum really starts to kick in. If you haven't already stockpiled months/years of food you are in trouble.
    I missed this one Just a bit of hyperbole there.

    Here's the USDA acreage report as of June 28, 2019

    Corn Planted Acreage Up 3 Percent from 2018
    Soybean Acreage Down 10 Percent
    All Wheat Acreage Down 5 Percent
    All Cotton Acreage Down 3 Percent
    https://www.nass.usda.gov/Publicatio...s/acrg0619.pdf

    Yes, localized areas had flooding, but not entire states .
    Was known as dairyfarmer but sold the cows.

  23. #23
    The corn crop is quite far behind normal maturity but with the size of new equipment huge amounts of time can be made up when the crops are ready.

    https://www.agriculture.com/news/cro...ture-usda-says


    Blizzard-Like Weather Approaches, Only Half of Corn Is Mature, USDA Says
    By Mike McGinnis
    2-3 minutes
    You are here

    Corn, soybean harvest activity inched ahead this past week.


    DES MOINES, Iowa -- U.S. crops have deteriorating conditions, while harvest pace drops below half of the country’s average.

    Many farmers continue to wait on the sidelines to get into the fields. With freezing temperatures, heavy snowfall, and high winds set to hit the northern Plains this week, the corn in North Dakota is only 22% mature vs. a 75% five-year average, according to Monday’s USDA Crop Progress Report.

    Also, South Dakota corn is rated 36% mature vs. an 80% five-year average. Minnesota farmers have a corn crop that is just 39% mature vs. an 83% five-year average.
    Corn

    In its weekly Crop Progress Report, the USDA pegged the U.S. corn harvest at 15% complete vs. an 27% five-year average.

    The overall condition of the corn crop is rated at 56% good to excellent in the top 18 corn producing states vs. 57% a week ago.

    Also, 93% of the corn has entered the dent stage vs. a 99% five-year average.

    USDA rated the crop in the mature stage at 58% vs. 85% five-year average, the slowest on record.


    The amount of soybeans harvested equals 14% of the crop, below a 34% five-year average.

    The nation’s crop is rated 53% good/excellent compared with 55% a week ago.

    The USDA pegged the amount of soybeans dropping leaves at 72% vs. a five-year average of 87%.
    Attached Images

  24. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Cacheman View Post
    The corn crop is quite far behind normal maturity but with the size of new equipment huge amounts of time can be made up when the crops are ready.

    https://www.agriculture.com/news/cro...ture-usda-says


    Blizzard-Like Weather Approaches, Only Half of Corn Is Mature, USDA Says
    By Mike McGinnis
    2-3 minutes
    You are here

    Corn, soybean harvest activity inched ahead this past week.


    DES MOINES, Iowa -- U.S. crops have deteriorating conditions, while harvest pace drops below half of the country’s average.

    Many farmers continue to wait on the sidelines to get into the fields. With freezing temperatures, heavy snowfall, and high winds set to hit the northern Plains this week, the corn in North Dakota is only 22% mature vs. a 75% five-year average, according to Monday’s USDA Crop Progress Report.

    Also, South Dakota corn is rated 36% mature vs. an 80% five-year average. Minnesota farmers have a corn crop that is just 39% mature vs. an 83% five-year average.
    Corn

    In its weekly Crop Progress Report, the USDA pegged the U.S. corn harvest at 15% complete vs. an 27% five-year average.

    The overall condition of the corn crop is rated at 56% good to excellent in the top 18 corn producing states vs. 57% a week ago.

    Also, 93% of the corn has entered the dent stage vs. a 99% five-year average.

    USDA rated the crop in the mature stage at 58% vs. 85% five-year average, the slowest on record.


    The amount of soybeans harvested equals 14% of the crop, below a 34% five-year average.

    The nation’s crop is rated 53% good/excellent compared with 55% a week ago.

    The USDA pegged the amount of soybeans dropping leaves at 72% vs. a five-year average of 87%.
    Look at the weather for the middle of the country next week. If the majority of the crop in an area is immature, and they have a hard freeze coming. The yield will be destroyed. If it's simply not dry enough, they can harvest it later . . But if it's not in the dent stage, I hope they have farm insurance.

  25. #25


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  26. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
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    Illinois backwoods
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    Plenty of harvest in central Illinois...... between rains and all.

    If it frosts hard Friday night, a lot of late soybeans will suffer.
    “I would remind you that extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice! And let me remind you also that moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue.” Barry Goldwater.

  27. #27
    The seed corn has been being harvested and hauled to the seed corn companies in east central Illinois for at least two weeks. The corn around my homestead started being harvested on Monday and is still going strong. The county roads are full of semi's hauling from the fields to the elevators. Busy, busy for sure.

    Had to travel west to a grandchilds Volley Ball game yesterday and saw many farmers out in the fields along I74. Even saw a field or two of beans being combined, but mostly was corn,

    Don't know if the contracted corn crop for Frito Lay is being hauled to their elevator west of Homer, haven't been up in that area for awhile.

    Can't speak for the rest of the state, but around me the elevators are hoping and you have to be extra careful on country roads due to semi's, grain trucks and combines moving around all day.

    Mold and dust in the air makes you use ac just to keep it out of your lungs.

    If it stays dry, guessing they'll have it all out of the field within two weeks at most.

  28. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by rafter View Post
    I'm in mid Missouri and they are combining like crazy. Almost all the corn is out and they are starting on beans. Which is early for beans.
    Same here. We're 50 miles south of I-70 and harvest has been going on for a couple weeks for corn and beans both. Hard to make time driving anywhere with all the farm machinery on the roads.

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    Central Indiana
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    There are more soybean fields than corn around us here in Central Indiana this year and every soybean field in our AO was harvested this week. No one has started on field corn as far as I can tell, there is still a lot of green in it.
    Terri in Indiana

    "Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle." - Plato

  30. #30
    The combines are running non-stop here (NW Iowa) the last couple of days. Fields are still too wet, but with more rain and possibly snow in the forecast they are combining and leaving deep ruts in the fields. Crops went in late, growing season was miserable i.e. too hot or too cool and too wet or too dry so no surprise harvest season is not ideal. I haven't heard what the grain moisture level is for beans or corn coming out of the fields or what the yield is like. I do know farmers were talking about expense of drying. Late harvest is affecting ethanol plants as they've exhausted 2018 crop and are waiting for 2019 harvest to start rolling in. Heard a couple elsewhere in the state are closed. Only saw one field of corn being combined but the beans were flying out of the fields.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Voortrekker View Post
    I drove across Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana and Ohio along I-70. More than 99% of the corn (maize pronounced my'zuh) fields have not been harvested. The stalks and leaves are brown in most of the fields and only a few had any green on the stalks/leaves.

    Are the farmers holding out for corn prices to rise? There were many fields not planted because of the flooding and the April and May snow storms in the mid-west.
    It's been too wet here to harvest. The corn needs so many days on the stock drying out before it can be harvested otherwise it'll mold in the grain bins.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by anna43 View Post
    I haven't heard what the grain moisture level is for beans or corn coming out of the fields or what the yield is like. I do know farmers were talking about expense of drying.
    The daily farm show on 1040AM out of Des Moines would have those percentages.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Meemur View Post
    They've been holding out because of the rain. They are about 28 days behind. Today and tomorrow will see a ton of work because it's been dry.
    What she said. Some harvesting has begun where I am, a few miles north of I-80 (not I-70). More farther north where I actually live. Weather there dictated that the guy on the south side harvested a week ago, and the guy on the north had crop that was still green. Difference was usually a day when one side was planted, and perhaps weeks later when it was dry enough for the other side of the road due to intervening rains.

    RR
    Survival and Austere Medicine: An Introduction - 2nd and 3rd Editions Contributing author and editor

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  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by anna43 View Post
    The combines are running non-stop here (NW Iowa) the last couple of days. Fields are still too wet, but with more rain and possibly snow in the forecast they are combining and leaving deep ruts in the fields. Crops went in late, growing season was miserable i.e. too hot or too cool and too wet or too dry so no surprise harvest season is not ideal. I haven't heard what the grain moisture level is for beans or corn coming out of the fields or what the yield is like. I do know farmers were talking about expense of drying. Late harvest is affecting ethanol plants as they've exhausted 2018 crop and are waiting for 2019 harvest to start rolling in. Heard a couple elsewhere in the state are closed. Only saw one field of corn being combined but the beans were flying out of the fields.
    Bingo, that's what I was talking about. I live in that area but have been down just above I-80 for 6 weeks doing hospice. Much different picture down here.

    RR
    Survival and Austere Medicine: An Introduction - 2nd and 3rd Editions Contributing author and editor

    Get your FREE copy of the 3rd edition here:NNPG Download Site

    Reddit AustereMedicine/

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reasonable Rascal View Post
    Bingo, that's what I was talking about. I live in that area but have been down just above I-80 for 6 weeks doing hospice. Much different picture down here.

    RR
    Where you here in town? If so if you end up in hospice again let us know and we'll come visit you.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  36. #36
    Saw a combine working the first field this morning driving into work.

  37. #37
    Just off I-70 here in Illinois. Most of what's coming out of the fields right now is soybeans. Most of the corn doesn't appear ready yet.

  38. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by packyderms_wife View Post
    Where you here in town? If so if you end up in hospice again let us know and we'll come visit you.
    He's helping provide hospice care to kin...

    Summerthyme

  39. #39
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    Thanks everyone for your replies. The question has been answered. USDA reports are unreliable but there is a private reporting service for farmers and their percentages contradict the USDA. Pennsylvania is also not harvesting maize and it is raining here in eastern NY and Penna.

    Ice Age Farmer and Yanasa Ama Ranch (YouTube) explained early frost and early freeze and its effects on plants. I am not reassured about the stability of agriculture because of the heavy rains, late season snows and early winter. I am stocking up on anything corn reliant like bourbon and such.
    "Approach with a calm resolve, attack with reckless indifference." Gladius Republicae!
    "...use gold like it's gunpowder..."

    Train and be ready, for that day will come!

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by naturallysweet View Post
    Look at the weather for the middle of the country next week. If the majority of the crop in an area is immature, and they have a hard freeze coming. The yield will be destroyed. If it's simply not dry enough, they can harvest it later . . But if it's not in the dent stage, I hope they have farm insurance.
    Can't eat money. Can't feed it to the livestock either.

    The rest of the planet is having similar crop problems. There's gonna be a real pinch in the food supply VERY soon - that should be mitigated by the fact that there's gonna be a couple billion fewer mouths to feed as a result... Grim times lie ahead.

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