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FARM Best metal cleaner-rusted vintage ratchet ... & patina'd silver chains?
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
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    A rough neighborhood in Hell.
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    7,985

    Best metal cleaner-rusted vintage ratchet ... & patina'd silver chains?

    I have a cool vintage ratchet that is so rusted the gears wont move. Is napalm jelly the best thing for this, or is there something I can soak it in that will penetrate all the mechanisms better and get it moving? I haven't tried wd40 but seems like needs something more industrial..

    Also, silver chains with patina that are dull and hard to polish in between... anything you can dip silver in that will clean it like the commercials show? no, or little rubbing of tight spots needed? TIA!!
    If I was born in Kenya, I'd be President by now.

    *My fingers are slysdexic. Damn.*
    They're, there, their. There. I know the difference. My mind is miles and miles of thought ahead of my fingers and my fingers are peons. peons do sh!tty work.:D

  2. #2
    diluted vinegar bath for the ratchet - make sure to neutralize the vinegar and oil it good ...
    Illini Warrior

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Southwest (enjoy it!)
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    4,663
    For rust removal naval jelly has been used for many years and works. If you just want to loosen the gears then Kroil would be an excellent choice.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    MN
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    2,627
    I'm not sure napalm would be the best choice

    I've heard good things about Evaporust, but haven't yet tried it.
    Was known as dairyfarmer but sold the cows.

  5. #5
    MAAS professional silver polish for silver and sterling. You can get it from Amazon.

    von Koehler
    Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!

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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
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    WI
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    Soak the ratchet in acetone.
    Sub-Zero

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    Farvana
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    Quote Originally Posted by von Koehler View Post
    MAAS professional silver polish for silver and sterling. You can get it from Amazon.

    von Koehler
    I like the patina on my silver jewelry. Chains not so much but if you wear them all the time it will come off the chain. Or perhaps I just can’t see it. It’s probably just a matter of taste on the patina and what the piece is. I have rubbed my finger and thumb on silver to remove what I want to remove and leave what I want to leave. But that’s just me. Some pieces couldn’t be treated that way obviously.
    The Operative: “The path to peace is paved with corpses. It’s always been so.”

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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Purdy area, Western WA
    Posts
    29,687

    13

    I would love to see a photo of “frozen with rust vintage ratchet” really WORTH spending the time and money on trying to get it working again, while you frequenty see them, even good brands, used, everywhere for $.50–$1.00 in yard sales! And thrift shops!

    Just recycle the metal and aim higher for the use of your time.
    When I saw crocheted doilies, tablecloths etc, going at yard sales for $.10 to a dollar or two, I swore I’d never value my time alive so low. The string they used to crochet cost three or four times the value of the item created with it!!!
    Last edited by ainitfunny; 10-08-2019 at 07:32 PM.
    Want a NEW LIFE, to be "born again?" Your acceptance of Jesus's death for you, by proxy, on the Cross must include your understanding, consenting/ratifying that YOU AGREE that means YOU, your will, your way died. When you do, then you become "born again", a new creation, filled with His Holy Spirit, Jesus and his eternal life will dwell within you as his temple. He died for all, but not all will RATIFY His sacrifice for them.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by BadMedicine View Post
    I have a cool vintage ratchet that is so rusted the gears wont move. Is napalm jelly the best thing for this, or is there something I can soak it in that will penetrate all the mechanisms better and get it moving? I haven't tried wd40 but seems like needs something more industrial..

    Also, silver chains with patina that are dull and hard to polish in between... anything you can dip silver in that will clean it like the commercials show? no, or little rubbing of tight spots needed? TIA!!
    That's what she said.

    As far as the silver chain, coin stores sell coin cleaner in little tubs that come with a little plastic round tray inside. Cleans silver in about one second.

  10. #10
    On the ratchet a good long (several days) soak in regular coke-a-cola. It is excellent for that kind of situation. The DW says any liquid (dip into) jewelry cleaner.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Tampa, FL
    Posts
    745
    Quote Originally Posted by BadMedicine View Post
    I have a cool vintage ratchet that is so rusted the gears wont move. Is napalm jelly the best thing for this, or is there something I can soak it in that will penetrate all the mechanisms better and get it moving? I haven't tried wd40 but seems like needs something more industrial..

    Also, silver chains with patina that are dull and hard to polish in between... anything you can dip silver in that will clean it like the commercials show? no, or little rubbing of tight spots needed? TIA!!

    White Vinegar [100% - NOT diluted] in a rubbermaid container to completely cover the ratchet for 2-3 days.....rinse in cold water while using toothbrush/nailbrush to scrub all surfaces.....then coat in penetrating oil and wipe off excess

    Silver.....use TARN X dip.....literally just dip the silver item for a few seconds & then rinse with cold water
    Attached Images

  12. #12
    I agree......White Vinegar

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    PRNJ
    Posts
    2,577
    White vinegar for the silver.
    Soak the ratchet in a mix of atf, turpentine and wd40.

  14. #14
    Something I've been looking into is to use a trickle charger to remove rust-- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aEsVPoSEWJ0

    Some other videos show using batteries -- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=54ADeB6V1rQ
    and
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qi8qIxK4IlA
    There's more about this if you search.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Sub-Zero View Post
    Soak the ratchet in acetone.
    And add just a little brake fluid about 50%. Probably should soak in a well ventilated area.

    I've done this and have brought back to life many a old tools with springs and what not. Just buy the cheapest brake fluid that walmart has. Much cheaper than many of the rust nut free sprays, and works better IMO.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Arizona Territory
    Posts
    48
    I have had decent success with soaking in PB Blaster and like others have said vinegar works well too. I recently picked up a can of Free All and it seems pretty worthwhile so far. Kroil works well too. If you look up Project Farm on YouTube he does a comparison on similar products and found Liquid Wrench to be the best for loosening stuck bolts.
    NRA Life Member

  17. #17
    I worked about 50 years as a mechanic, have a nice collection of very old tools..

    The best way to get one back in operating condition, is to take it apart. you can try all the different soaks, but if they fail, take it somewhere and have it bead blasted, NOT SANDBLASTED, bead blasting uses small glass beads, it will clean then up real nice,

    it is a waste of time and money, but so is collecting most things, like racecars,, I restored many of my Grandfathers tools, some from my dad, and some I just picked up who knows where,

    the wierdest is a double ended Cresent wrench. its a adjustable wrench on each end. anyone that looks at it asks the same question WHY? its the same on both ends?

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Shooter View Post
    I worked about 50 years as a mechanic, have a nice collection of very old tools..

    The best way to get one back in operating condition, is to take it apart. you can try all the different soaks, but if they fail, take it somewhere and have it bead blasted, NOT SANDBLASTED, bead blasting uses small glass beads, it will clean then up real nice,

    it is a waste of time and money, but so is collecting most things, like racecars,, I restored many of my Grandfathers tools, some from my dad, and some I just picked up who knows where,

    the wierdest is a double ended Cresent wrench. its a adjustable wrench on each end. anyone that looks at it asks the same question WHY? its the same on both ends?
    Muse.....

    The double ended cresent is for balance when twirling. And makes it easier to put a temporary cheater to extend the handle by just using another wrench clamped in the jaws of the side your not using?

    As often as I find myself using my cresent wrenches as a cresent hammer, If I had the double wrench I would paint one end green and only use the other end as a hammer.

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by West View Post
    Muse.....

    The double ended cresent is for balance when twirling. And makes it easier to put a temporary cheater to extend the handle by just using another wrench clamped in the jaws of the side your not using?

    As often as I find myself using my cresent wrenches as a cresent hammer, If I had the double wrench I would paint one end green and only use the other end as a hammer.
    might as well weld a hammer head on a cresent wrench and have it .

  20. #20
    I have a lemon tree in the backyard. I pick off 5-6 lemons juice them, and immerse item in lemon juice. Within 24hrs rust is dissolved, metal surface is a frosted gray color. Brush with a brass brush to get any remaining dirt. Soak in baking soda to neutralize the acidic lemon. Rinse in hot water and give a good wipe down with a vapor inhibiting anti-rust cloth.
    I'm off to the coast..

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