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GOV/MIL Trump Orders Crackdown On California Homelessness
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  1. #1
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    Trump Orders Crackdown On California Homelessness

    https://www.zerohedge.com/health/tru...7I2XXFh0Jmjr78

    Trump Orders Crackdown On California Homelessness

    President Trump has ordered White House officials to crack down on homelessness in California according to an anonymously-sourced Tuesday report in the Washington Post.

    #1 on the list appears to be Los Angeles's infamous "skid row," where vagrants will be moved into government-backed facilities. Trump is said to be actively involved in the effort, which is currently under discussion by the Department of Housing and Urban Development, the Domestic Policy Council, and the Department of Health and Human Services.

    One official cited the need to take action due to the "rampant diseases" and sewage problems (a.k.a. so much feces that San Franciscso pays 'poop patrollers' $185,000 per year to keep up with their shitty situation).

    Among the ideas under consideration is razing existing tent camps for the homeless, creating new temporary facilities, or refurbishing existing government facilities, two officials said. The officials spoke on the condition of anonymity because the planning hasn’t been publicly revealed. The changes would give the federal government a larger role in supervising housing and health care for residents.

    The Post notes that "the talks are fluid and concrete plans had not been reached."

    Given Trump's recent comments on the "disgrace to our country" of homelessness, along with the "rat and rodent infested" city of Baltimore (represented by House Oversight Committee Chairman Rep. Elijah Cummings (D) - who's investigating Trump in several matters), it stands to reason that dinging Democrats for their disastrously run sanctuary utopias will be a key focus going into the 2020 election.

    In early July, Trump told Fox News host Tucker Carlson that his administration "may intercede" in cities like New York, San Francisco and Los Angeles.

    "You can't have what's happening -- where police officers are getting sick just by walking the beat. I mean, they're getting actually very sick, where people are getting sick, where the people living there living in hell, too," said Trump. "We cannot ruin our cities. And you have people that work in those cities. They work in office buildings and to get into the building, they have to walk through a scene that nobody would have believed possible three years ago."

    And in a late July tweet, the president slammed Democrats for wasting time on "the Witch Hunt Hoax" instead of "focusing on our Country!"

    According to White House spokesman Judd Deere, Trump signed a June executive order governing the regulation of affordable housing, while his administration has been drawing up plans to deal with homelessness across the country.

    Trump’s executive order created a new White House council on eliminating “regulatory barriers” increasing the cost of building new housing, a move aimed at expanding the housing supply and driving down prices.

    "Like many Americans, the President has taken notice of the homelessness crisis, particularly in cities and states where the liberal policies are combining to dramatically increase poverty and public health risks," said Deere. "President Trump has directed his team to go further and develop a range of policy options for consideration to deal with this tragedy."

    Meanwhile, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti aide Breelyn Pete told Politico that a "very large delegation" of Trump administration officials were in town to discuss the matter.

    The number of homeless families in California has skyrocketed in recent years by at least 25%, according to David Garcia, policy director at the Terner Center for Housing Innovation at the University of California, Berkeley, who told the Post "Generally speaking, all the major cities have seen incredible increases. It’s a crisis."

    That said, Garcia also slammed Trump for adding to the homelessnes problem by "tightening immigrants' eligibility for federal assistance," which puts more families on the streets.

    California also lacks a “right to shelter” law that in other states gives homeless people temporary shelters, meaning a large percentage of California’s homeless population ends up sleeping on the street or in their vehicles, according to Diane Yentel, president and CEO of the National Low Income Housing Coalition, a nonprofit group.

    Complicating matters, California has enacted a number of restrictive zoning laws that drive up the cost of housing by constraining the state’s supply, she said, although some state lawmakers are pushing to relax those limits.

    Skid Row holds about 5,000 homeless people, an 11 percent increase from last year, according to statistics published in September by the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority. -Washington Post

    If the Trump administration's endeavors prove successful, poop patrollers may be out of a job.
    "During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." George Orwell

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    12,937
    This should go over well with Gov. Newsom and Nancy Pelosi

    _______________________

    Here is a great op-ed (long) on another perspective on the homeless crisis in Olympia WA:

    https://medium.com/@CandaceMercer/th...s-ad68199ab708

    The Real Crisis In Olympia is Not Homelessness
    Candy Mercer
    Sep 1 · 15 min read

    Tolerance for harm is destroying our city

    Our regional government has been treating our problems solely as a homeless issue, but it is far greater. It also involves mental illness, substance abuse and crime. Each piece of the problem needs solutions. Housing, especially affordable rent, is a large component, but addiction, an emerging street subculture and law enforcement are factors we have been reticent to address directly as we watch our city decay in real time.

    The 4th Avenue Bridge in downtown Olympia at the foot of Puget Sound is in an environmentally sensitive area. An unsanctioned homeless camp has set up under the bridge. Water testing has revealed fecal coliform bacteria due to untreated human waste. The camp is scheduled for removal on September 11th, some campers have indicated they will refuse to leave.

    People are upset about changing norms for what is considered permissible behavior in our community. This is the root of our collective distress and the cause for deep moral reflection. In the name of tolerance, we are allowing anti-social behavior to become entrenched.

    Some even defend theft and violence as a reasonable response if it originates with the “oppressed.” This is a rationalization used by homeless advocates and addiction evangelists to challenge the very legitimacy of the social contract. Neutralizations are euphemisms designed to loosen norms, allowing deviance to flourish unchecked.

    In an attempt to quell the natural moral dissonance that comes from doing something wrong, these repositionings allow people to litter without shame, steal without guilt and cause harm without remorse. Because there is no pushback and no consequences, anti-social behavior is emboldened and lawlessness is the inevitable result.


    Not just our imagination

    The majority of Olympia rejects these new norms. There are far too many stories of harm across the spectrum, from aggression to assault, for this the be dismissed as mere “class discomfort.” Furthermore, it is disrespectful when victims are not believed.

    Bike chop shops are numerous and operate in the open, some across from the Intercity Transit Center in downtown Olympia (center and upper right). Bicycle parts are used as currency in exchange for drugs.

    Menacing/aggressive behavior, threatened assault, actual assault, vandalism and theft. So much theft. Hundreds of stolen bikes, visible bike chop shops, shoplifting, hundreds of shopping carts, cars, sheds and homes broken into. An heirloom violin that will not be passed down another generation. A child’s ashes. Yes. A child’s ashes were stolen from a hotel room in Hawk’s Prairie. The human remains desecrated, a family’s loss compounded exponentially.

    A bike was stolen and someone responded on Facebook positioning property crime as a “regressive tax on ordinary people [that] wouldn’t rob us of what little ‘wealth’ we have if only everyone were housed.” Lack of housing is not driving property crime, drugs are. Theft is routinized as a form of reparations and neutralized with the term “survival crime,” the goal being to decriminalize crime itself.

    It is considered shameful in Olympia to even broach the subject of addiction and related crime. We know all homeless are not addicts and not all addicts are homeless. We are also aware housed criminals are also profiting from this misery, they should not feel comfortable operating in Thurston County either.
    Impact on the community

    The goal is not to demonize people, but to change policy by using social pressure to demonstrate that harm, in whatever form it takes, is not welcome in our community. The primary endpoint is getting people help so they are not harming themselves either.

    Olympia’s benevolence is being extorted by addicts who want to live where they want and take what they want, be it land or personal property, without interference. Citizens are expected to support, even embrace, this subculture as a valid lifestyle choice, one which will lead to chronic, perhaps lifetime, homelessness.

    Unsanctioned camping under the 4th Avenue Bridge across from the State Capitol building is creating numerous public hazards. In addition to environmental issues, there is concern due to open fires. Recently, O.F.D. responded to a tent fire and found a dozen propane tanks stored next to the burned tent. Damage to this crucial piece of infrastructure would be a hardship to the community and could cost millions of dollars to repair.

    Right now Olympia is enabling this subculture. Allowing civil norms to decay, the city is complicit in the harm caused to its citizens. We, as a city, are sick, and drastic action is required to heal. The politics of the situation are further dividing us as we argue over strategy and act as if we are not on the same team.

    People with good hearts are being shamed for having differing values and expectations around fairness, order and safety. If we complain about impact, we risk being considered to be lacking compassion. We are slurred with the nonsensical “housie” as if shelter was not the ultimate goal for all. Intentionally or not, people are being made to feel guilty just for being housed.

    This undercurrent of emotional manipulation is indicative of a severely dysfunctional relationship. The same codependent dynamics experienced at a family level when a loved one is addicted are being played out on a macro level in the community. Compassion can include boundaries, in fact, sometimes, compassion is boundaries.

    People, particularly small business owners, are afraid to speak, especially at City Council meetings, for fear of harsh reprisal. Around Christmas, boycott fliers circulated calling downtown businesses “economic terrorists.” Other retaliation, in the name of “activism,” has included coordinated phone zaps and vandalism, locks glued shut, needles and knives planted upright in greenery in an attempts to harm. Customers and employees are frightened by aggressive panhandling.

    “Activists” have also targeted individuals, sometimes only for sharing their personal experience — doxxing them, harassing them at work and bullying them online in attempt to silence. Self-censorship is rampant, and concerning. Many communications are done privately out of fear. This is Olympia in 2019.

    Compassion fatigue

    All of this is leading to collective compassion fatigue even in an extremely generous community. Relationships are frayed, tensions raised, resentment and backlash brewing.

    Impact on retailers is huge, both from shoplifting and from hundreds of stolen carts, which cost $200+ each depending on the model. Other costs to retailers include clean-up, damage and lost revenue. Many customers feel uncomfortable visiting downtown, the West Side and Lacey are also becoming more volatile.

    Recently I helped someone at the Mitigation Site downtown. He offered me stolen goods — power tools, “like new,” and phone chargers, “I have all types.” My emotions cycled.

    During the storm this winter, my disabled neighbor was assaulted 100' from my house. He was jumped from behind by two men and suffered a broken rib, bruises and lacerations. The assailants were scared off by another neighbor.

    A neighbor has chased men out of my yard several times. Due to theft, my shed is useless. The last lock was tampered with and could not be opened. I had to break into my own shed.

    In early June, we had our first fire in an unsanctioned camp on Devoe Street and there have been several more since, including one under the 4th Avenue Bridge and one adjacent to I-5. Someone was shot in the “Jungle,” another person shot on the Eastside. There was a brawl downtown, and a man stabbed in Tumwater. In one week.

    Heritage Park has been closed to many activities due to theft at the old brewery that released toxic chemicals into the water, costing millions of dollars in remediation. We have untreated human waste entering sensitive areas like Percival Creek and Puget Sound, both of which are also under threat due to the large amount of trash and needles being left by campers. Recently the city of Tumwater picked up approximately 1000 needles from land near Percival Creek.

    Lack of respect

    Hearts are closing because of what is perceived as either lack of respect or active disrespect toward those paying the bills and making the donations. People are livid when they see vandalism done to the port-a-potties under the 4th Avenue Bridge for which the city pays several hundred dollars a month. It is a middle finger to the taxpayers. It is meant to be. The lack of gratitude provokes.

    Visible bike chop shops send a similar message — we can, and we will, steal from you, and there is absolutely nothing you can do about it. Another middle finger. Message sent, and received.

    Port-a-potties, at a cost of several hundreds of dollars a month, were vandalized within days of being installed under the 4th Avenue Bridge. The footings of the bridge have also been extensively spray painted in acts of defiance. Campers have broken many promises made to the city, including a ban on open fires.

    It is not reasonable to demand or expect respect under these conditions. Recently a representative of the Mitigation Site brought a long list of (expensive) demands for additional services to the Olympia City Council, everything from free Wi-Fi, to solar power for individual tents, to a dog run and pet food.

    There was no corresponding list of what the residents were willing to do in exchange for this aid. No concurrent sense of responsibility to the community from which they ask so much. No talk of contribution, financial or otherwise.

    Hardworking people, especially those who struggle themselves, are understandably upset over this attitude of entitlement. Desire to help is trashed, the same as the port-a-potties.

    Yet we still have a moral obligation to care for people, even when they are disrespectful and especially when they are ill. No wonder we have so much angst and anger. But to be even tacitly OK with this bad behavior is akin to submitting to an abusive relationship.

    Information is power

    If you want to keep the Olympia we all so deeply love, and the Lacey, and the Tumwater, it is time to make your voice heard. Speak. We need you to. Downtown businesses have a voice, homeless activists have a voice, but there is no organized voice from the perspective of ordinary people.

    Elected officials need support to make difficult decisions. Good governance must be prioritized over politics and feel good actions. Both citizens and policy-makers need quality information. Not complaints or ideology, but practical, factual knowledge from those on the front lines of the epidemic.

    It is easy to reach out to officials in all three cities who would be willing to meet with their constituents, particularly those Council Members who are up for re-election, and their challengers. (See the end of article for more information about voting in this year’s election.) We also have access to county and state government, and we need to invite them into our conversation as well. Call them. Tell your story. Demand action.

    We need input from former addicts, law enforcement, prosecutors, and the medical profession so we can decide the most effective pressure to apply. No one is going to gather this information for us. We have no meaningful local press, yet we are staying informed about events through the work of citizen journalists who share what they document. Citizens who do not consider themselves journalists are also doing valuable ad hoc reporting.

    Summarizing City Council meetings, event report backs, sharing experiences of harm and success, photographs and videos, all of these spread information and should be encouraged. Facebook, Next Door, YouTube and reddit are all powerful and remarkably easy-to-use tools for both reporting and organizing. It is inspiring to see talented people who have never cared about politics stepping up and showing civic leadership.

    Moral calculus

    What exactly do we want? What are we willing to fight for? An Olympia we are proud to show off? An Olympia where we feel safe in person and property? An Olympia where you can be as weird as you want to be, as long as you do no harm?
    What are the most compassionate and effective actions to take? How do we want policy and policing to change? Where do we stand on hard drug use, especially in public?

    In which direction does our moral compass point?

    Hundreds of thousands of dollars, some of which is being diverted from homeless and low income populations who need minimal help to get or stay housed, is being used for temporary solutions. The subculture of the unwilling is crowding out the needs of the unable in a competition for scarce resources.

    How do we preference who to help? What happens to people we cannot help, whether for lack of funding, legal constraints or because they are not willing to work with the system? We cannot be blind to the overwhelming cost per person of detox, inpatient and outpatient substance abuse treatment, and that due to the chronic nature of addiction, people can cycle through multiple times. Prioritizing the addicted population means far less help for single parents, seniors and the otherwise disabled.

    We have dozens of unsanctioned camps, spreading from the downtown core into suburban and, increasingly, rural areas. We are seeing environmental impact, how will this land be remediated? Who pays for the cleanup? Is it fair to put this burden on private property owners? It’s not fair for taxpayers to cover it either, but someone has to. It is also not fair that money that could be put toward shelter and treatment is being diverted to massive clean-ups. Some municipally owned sites are not being cleaned up at all, especially land owned by the Washington State Department of Transportation.

    The total costs of homelessness to the community in direct and indirect costs cannot be underestimated. Lacey police report 200 calls related to homelessness in a thirty day period, approximately seven per day with an average time of 27 minutes per response. LOTT, our water treatment utility, is spending an additional $280K a year on security. Businesses pay to clean and repair damage, citizens pay for broken car windows, stolen packages, siphoned gas and security systems. The list is endless.

    There are also opportunity costs. City employees complain the issue is diverting time from other necessary work. Emergency rooms fill with drug seekers and assaults on medical personnel are becoming more frequent. Legitimate pain patients are being denied access to medication due to fear of abuse. Downtown is not attractive for business or pleasure. People are losing the psychic freedom of feeling safe, something you cannot put a price on. The waste of human potential also can not be quantified.

    Why isn’t the state and federal government helping? Should the entire region be declared a disaster zone? A humanitarian and public health crisis? Should FEMA be involved? The Center for Disease Control? The EPA? By allowing the crisis to evolve, we have risked federal involvement and media attention that may not be welcome.

    (see rest of op-ed on website)
    "During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." George Orwell

  3. #3
    Omg... Happy dancing! If we have opportunity for popcorn, too, well so much the better!!
    Thoughts are things. Thus I'm careful of the thoughts I think, & the company I keep.
    I myself am entirely made of flaws, stiched together with good intentions.
    MOON™~> all in the ignorant opinion of an uneducated slip of a woman who keeps forgetting to mind her manners, know her place and bow down to her betters

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
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    OK
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    32,886
    This is heavy duty.

    Trump is making some kind of power play. Ya' don't dive into state/local politics on a whim.

    Interesting that...there is talk about him stepping off into the social media companies about censorship, at the same time.


    Popcorn
    Proud Infidel...............and Cracker

    Member: Nowski Brigade

    Deplorable


  5. #5
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    Didn't take long...

    https://www.redding.com/story/news/n...isdaom8t1uFY24


    Trump officials look to fix California homeless problem, state officials say back off

    Marco della Cava, Michele Chandler and John Fritze, USA TODAY Published 5:08 p.m. PT Sept. 10, 2019 | Updated 5:36 p.m. PT Sept. 10, 2019

    SAN FRANCISCO — Trump administration officials confirmed Tuesday they are on the ground in California looking at ways to intervene in the state’s mounting homelessness issue, which President Donald Trump has criticized as “disgusting” and a “disgrace to our country.”

    But many elected officials and homelessness experts in the Golden State said any White House assistance would be disingenuous given federal housing cuts have helped exacerbate the problem. Some also accused Trump of using the homelessness issue to win over conservative supporters ahead of the 2020 election.

    “We need federal support and resources to build more housing for people living on the streets," San Francisco Mayor London Breed said in a statement. “But simply cracking down on homelessness without providing the housing people need is not a real solution.”

    Nathan Click, chief spokesman for California Gov. Gavin Newsom, also in part blamed the president for the state's poverty woes. “If the president is willing to put serious solutions, with real investment, on the table, California stands ready to talk. He could start by ending his plans to cut food stamps, gut health care for low-income people and scare immigrant families from accessing government services,” he said.

    State Sen. Scott Wiener (D-San Francisco) was even more blunt.

    “Trump needs to back off and focus on his own mess of an administration," Wiener said. "Rounding up homeless people into federal facilities won’t solve the problem. We need to get people the help they need, including shelter, housing, and other services.”

    Trump plans still unclear

    Trump officials have not specified what kinds of actions or solutions they would implement in California.

    A senior administration official speaking on the condition of anonymity to discuss internal deliberations confirmed to USA TODAY that a team of federal officials was on the ground in California assessing local homeless camps. The official said the team was conducting a fact-finding mission to learn more about the crisis.

    The news was first reported by The Washington Post, which cited unnamed officials describing a coming crackdown, particularly in cities such as Los Angeles and San Francisco, which have some of the nation's largest homeless populations.

    The report did not specify what actions officials planned to take, but suggested that camps could be razed with homeless individuals moved into either new facilities or refurbished buildings.

    According to last year's survey by the Department of Housing and Urban Development, some 130,000 Californians were homeless, or nearly a quarter of the national total.

    Officials said Los Angeles' "Skid Row" was a particular priority. The area has seen a growing number of homeless as housing prices there and in most California cities continue to skyrocket. Los Angeles County saw nearly 59,000 homeless residents during a June count, up from approximately 55,000 people in 2017.

    Late Tuesday, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti released a letter written to Trump that outlined a number of things his administration could do to help the homelessness issue in Los Angeles, which with some 79,000 homeless residents, trails only New York City.

    Garcetti, who recently led administration officials on a tour of a range of homeless shelters and housing complexes, said that although "this crisis is decades in the making," solutions could include protecting existing fair-housing laws, rescinding proposed HUD rules to evict mixed-status immigrant families from assisted housing, and supporting measures that would expand the housing safety net for veterans and the poor.

    No where in Garcetti's letter did he address the prospect of L.A. homeless encampments being razed and its population's moved to federal housing projects.

    White House spokesman Judd Deere said in a statement Tuesday that "like many Americans, the president has taken notice of the homelessness crisis, particularly in cities and states where the liberal policies of overregulation, excessive taxation and poor public service delivery are combining to dramatically increase poverty and public health risks."

    Deere added that Trump has "directed his team to go further and develop a range of policy options for consideration to deal with this tragedy."

    First reaction: 'Internment camps'
    But critics are far from eager for the president's help.

    Bob Erlenbusch, executive director of the Sacramento Regional Coalition to End Homelessness, fretted that president was looking to round homeless people up.

    "My first reaction is that it felt like internment camps for people experiencing homelessness," he said. "The president doesn’t seem to have any grasp of the homeless crisis not only in California but around the country."

    Some, however, welcomed the possibility of federal intervention.

    When asked about whether razing homeless camps could be seen as a violation homeless peoples’ civil rights, U.S. Rep. Doug LaMalfa (R-Richvale) said Democrats across the state might be overreacting.

    “Civil rights based on people squatting on land that isn’t theirs, that is a bit of a reach there,” he said.

    A meeting held this earlier this year on homelessness in California seemed to presage the administration's interest in potentially stepping in.

    Jonathan Anderson, executive director of the Redding-based Good News Rescue Mission, the only homeless shelter in Shasta County in northern California, said that during a national homelessness conference in April, officials from the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development asked to meet with the 30 executive directors of rescue missions from California, Washington and Oregon about possible future partnerships.

    The discussions touched on “how could these faith-based nonprofits co-locate and partner and bring the government agencies into sharing the workload that we’re doing. That was very encouraging. No decisions were made. It was just very open dialogue," he said.

    “They did say," Anderson added, "that no matter what happens, the majority of this is going to be focused around the L.A. region."

    Trump has had a long running feud not only with California's governor, but also with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who represents San Francisco. California has filed roughly 50 lawsuits against the Trump administration in the past two years over matters ranging from immigration to the U.S. Census.

    The president has not hesitated to blast the largely liberal state, whose importance in the 2020 election has grown since its primary was moved to March.

    A homeless man sits at his tent along the Interstate 110 freeway in downtown Los Angeles. California Gov. Gavin Newsom met with the mayors of some of California's largest cities to discuss the homeless situation last month.

    “Nearly half of all the homeless people living in the streets in America happen to live in the state of California," Trump said during a rally in Ohio last month. “What they are doing to our beautiful California is a disgrace to our country. It’s a shame.”

    Newsom ran for governor on a range of liberal platforms, including addressing homelessness, which in Newsom's hometown of San Francisco has led to needles and feces being strewn along main business and tourist thoroughfares such as Market Street.

    The governor has pledged $1 billion from his budget to tackling homelessness, including allocating $650 million to local governments to deal with emergency homelessness aid and shelter, and $265 million for mental health support.

    It's unclear how much authority a federal entity might have in trying to implement anti-homelessness measures in California.

    "If you're not doing anything illegal, authorities can't just pick you up to tell you where to go," says Steve Berg, vice president for programs and policy with the National Alliance to End Homelessness in Washington, D.C., a non-profit that works with communities to tackle homelessness.

    "Having people at all levels pay attention to this issue is good," he says. "But only if you're approaching it in a solution-oriented way."

    Feds can help — with money

    David Garcia, policy director at the University of California, Berkeley's Terner Center for Housing Innovation, said he was skeptical about the Trump administration's aims.

    "Any strategy that focuses on removing homeless camps and displacing the homeless lacks compassion at best, and at worst exacerbates the challenges," says Garcia. "Based on this administration's rhetoric, they don't seem to be focused on really solving the homelessness crisis."

    Garcia notes that the administration's increasing pressure on immigrant populations within the U.S. has only added to the growing legions of homeless, as federal assistance continues to dry up and immigrants fear applying for aid.

    "If the federal government is interested in helping, that's great," says Margot Kushel, a professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco and director of the Benioff Homelessness and Housing Initiative, a research center founded by a donation from Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff and his wife Lynne.

    "What they can start with is dramatically increasing their financial support for affordable housing," says Kushel.

    Since Trump entered office, the White House budget has proposed slashing funding for the Department of Housing and Urban Development in each year's budget. The White House's 2020 budget proposes slashing the department's funding by $9.6 billion.

    Amid these cutbacks, the Trump administration has expanded grant programs for local agencies working to help individuals experiencing homelessness. The 2020 budget proposed increasing funding for services for people experiencing homelessness by 9% to $2.6 billion.

    Despite widespread skepticism over the Trump administration's potential plans for homeless people in California, some officials acknowledged that the problem may well now be beyond the scope of local and even state officials.

    San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer, a Republican, has been critical of the Trump administration and said he didn’t vote for the president in 2016. But like Trump, the San Diego Mayor also says California politicians have largely failed to address the state’s homelessness crisis. In 2018, the homeless population in San Diego dropped to 8,576 people, down by 600 people from the year before.

    “San Diego has taken significant action over the last few years to reduce homelessness, but cities can't do it alone," said Faulconer, who has funded shelters and storage facilities for individuals experiencing homelessness and implemented policies to curb tent encampments and people sleeping in their cars. "We welcome additional federal resources to help us move more individuals off the streets and into housing."

    In nearby Palm Springs, City Councilwoman Christy Holstege said the president was likely attacking state lawmakers for political gain as the 2020 election creeps closer.

    “He’s using talking points to rally his base," said Holstege. "That’s what he’s doing here, trying to shame California about our homelessness crisis."

    The number of individuals experiencing homelessness in Palm Springs has skyrocketed in recent years, growing to 196 homeless people earlier this year. On Monday, state lawmakers earmarked $10 million to be used to fund homelessness services and infrastructure in the city.

    “My question to the president would be if he’s going to raze camps, then where will those people go," Holstege said. "The reason there are tent camps is because there isn’t sufficient housing."
    "During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." George Orwell

  6. #6
    It is so encouraging to finally see the pendulum swing and some push back taking place. Maybe there is hope for us yet, eh? As far as the deluded dogooders, and intentionally evil...
    Lets hope some sanity is restored.

    . This undercurrent of emotional manipulation is indicative of a severely dysfunctional relationship. The same codependent dynamics experienced at a family level when a loved one is addicted are being played out on a macro level in the community.
    Compassion can include boundaries, in fact, sometimes, compassion is boundaries.
    Marsh writes . Exactly what I said to myself too. This is not misguided, but outright embracing of known harm...for whatever the payoff is that they are getting from the current situation. : (
    Thoughts are things. Thus I'm careful of the thoughts I think, & the company I keep.
    I myself am entirely made of flaws, stiched together with good intentions.
    MOON™~> all in the ignorant opinion of an uneducated slip of a woman who keeps forgetting to mind her manners, know her place and bow down to her betters

  7. #7
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    Apr 2004
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    Southern California
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    5,434
    I used to ride my bike along the LA river through Glendale (north of LA), along the 134 and 5 freeways. I’d get off at Fletcher and ride through the area. It was such a nice ride. Can’t do that anymore. All along the bike path up and down the LA river, homeless have pitched tents. it’s disgusting. the price of housing and pretty much everything, including taxes in Southern California is also disgusting. 10.25% sales tax (ironically part of that was recently raised to help fund services for the homeless, supposedly! haha!

    downtown LA is worse than i have ever seen it. It’s horrible.

  8. #8
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    https://www.dailywire.com/news/51619...ign=benshapiro

    REPORT: Proposed L.A. Homeless Plan Would Ban Sleeping On More Than 25% Of City Streets And Sidewalks

    By JEFFREY CAWOOD
    September 10, 2019

    A recent analysis found that a proposed plan to address homelessness in Los Angeles would ban people from sleeping on at least 26% of the city’s streets and sidewalks, making it more difficult for the tens of thousands of unhoused individuals to find a place to rest.

    According to an L.A. Times report published Monday, more than half of some neighborhoods would off-limits for people who bed down outdoors if the city council approves the legislation.

    “The reality is we have sensitive areas to consider and as city leaders we must strike the balance between the needs of those experiencing homelessness and keeping our public spaces safe and accessible,” said Councilman Mitch O’Farrell, a progressive Democrat who introduced the measure.

    As The Times recently reported:

    Under the proposal, L.A. would bar people from sleeping, lying or sitting on streets and sidewalks in a list of prohibited areas. They could not sleep within 500 feet of a school, park, day care or any recently opened facility that serves homeless people – a provision that appears to be aimed at easing neighborhood opposition to new shelters and housing …

    Sleeping on bicycle paths would also be off limits, along with tunnels or bridges designated as school routes. And people could not sleep in public areas with signs barring trespassing or closing times for safety or maintenance purposes. Nor could they sleep on sidewalks in crowded areas near big venues, such as Staples Center or the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

    The plan would replace L.A.’s existing rules against sidewalk sleeping, which have been described as out-of-date since the homeless population overtook the number of available shelter beds. The current ordinance makes it a crime to sit or sleep on a public sidewalk anywhere in the city, but it was the subject of a major lawsuit several years ago. Now, it can only be enforced under limited circumstances, per a 2007 settlement with the ACLU.

    Critics predict the proposed policy changes would continue to push homeless people to less desirable areas of L.A., such as the northeast San Fernando Valley, away from most luxury residential developments and gentrification projects. Some homeless advocates call the idea “completely unworkable” and said the new rules would create encampment zones concentrated around the city’s commercial strips.

    “Most of the public toilets that people can use are in our parks, and if you tell people they can’t be within 500 feet of a park where do they go during the day to use that toilet?” asked Carol Sobel, a civil rights attorney who has represented homeless people in lawsuits against the city. “It’s a counter-productive proposal.”

    If approved, Sobel argued that the new rules would make it almost impossible for unsheltered people to sleep outdoors in the notorious Skid Row neighborhood, where an estimated 4,757 homeless individuals currently reside. The area contains several homeless shelters and other support facilities that have opened in recent years, meaning street dwellers would be prohibited from camping on the surrounding sidewalks.

    Opponents of the measure, such as Councilman Mike Bonin whose district includes Venice Beach, predicts the law would be invalidated by the courts. However, the L.A. City Attorney’s office is confident the recommended policy changes would hold up if challenged.

    More from The Times:

    Last year, a federal court tossed out rules enacted in Boise, Idaho, that restricted sleeping on public property. The decision in that case, Martin v. City of Boise, applies to California and several other states in the West.

    The court concluded that as long as there is no option to sleep in a shelter or housing, “the government cannot criminalize indigent, homeless people for sleeping outdoors, on public property.”

    However, the court also said that “even where shelter is unavailable, an ordinance prohibiting sitting, lying, or sleeping outside at particular times or in particular locations might well be constitutionally permissible.”

    Data from the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority estimates there are more than 27,000 unsheltered people within the city limits, but only about 8,100 emergency shelter beds. LAist reports that more than half of those beds are reserved for families and children, leaving approximately 4,000 for single adults.

    Follow Jeffrey Cawood on Twitter @JeffreyCawood.
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    "That said, Garcia also slammed Trump for adding to the homelessness problem by "tightening immigrants' eligibility for federal assistance," which puts more families on the streets. "

    that would be ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS

  10. #10
    While banning sleeping on the streets makes city councils feels good and assures the public that they are "doing something," what happens in practice is that yep they tear down a few camps, scatter people ot the winds but since they have nowhere else to go the tents just move down the street or have returned two weeks later.

    City Jails only have so much room and I suspect 60,000 people would rather strain even as large as the one for LA County.

    You have to have someplace for people actually to go, which is almost never the case; even San Francsico admitted they LIED about that before scattering the population in front of City Hall.

    That simply moved the problem to the doorways of businesses, the front steps of apartment blocks and destroyed the city parks (as the homeless moved there).

    I don't have an easy solution, but just banning people who have no place to go from sleeping there is like telling people without option it is illegal to go to the bathroom, both are going to happen anyway.

    The "camp" idea could work but only if it used carrots and sticks, it would have to be set up in some way so as not to be another form of jail.

    I mean yeah, you could call out the National Guard to move 60,000 people but where do they move them too?

    I have never yet seen a situation where the "where to move them to" problem was solved before the "media" was called in to "view" and "report" that the city was "cleaning things ups" by bulldozing the camps.

    I'd love to see a situation where some decent alternatives (including for the mentally ill) were put in place first, before trying to "move people along."
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  11. #11
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    Why bother. Mentally the people of the west coast are broken. I talked about this problem with my sister in Seattle about the degradation of all democratic controlled cities and states and ya know what she said . Just because of a few bad decisions isn't a reason to abandon the democratic party. How do you fix that.
    vienna 1683.

    Turn your swords into plowshares ,and you'll be plowing for those that didn't...

    We didn't create GOD out of our imagination ,He created us out of his.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrapman View Post
    Why bother. Mentally the people of the west coast are broken. I talked about this problem with my sister in Seattle about the degradation of all democratic controlled cities and states and ya know what she said . Just because of a few bad decisions isn't a reason to abandon the democratic party. How do you fix that.
    Because, among other things, it won't stay on the West Coast (or in New York), if past situations are any guide the more temperate areas and the areas thought to have some employment will get massive homeless problems first.

    But like the "Reaganvilles" of the early 1980s recession (yep they existed) if nothing is done and current trends continue, especially if there is a sudden drop from good employment back to massive layoffs (as happened in the early 1980s) other cities from Denver to Willmington are going to have versions of the same problem.

    This time with children freezing to death in "snow approved" sleeping bags as happened in Denver when I lived there.

    I think the Trump Administration (or someone in it, possibly Dr. Carson himself) realizes the potential for this and is trying to be proactive about it - the fact that it gives them a chance to punch some political enemies in the figurative eye just adds icing on the cake for them.
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  13. #13
    better off pouring the entire US military into the Afganistan Quagmire than attempting this >>>> CA & associated Sanctuary Cities will battle this to the absolute DEATH
    Illini Warrior

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Illini Warrior View Post
    better off pouring the entire US military into the Afganistan Quagmire than attempting this >>>> CA & associated Sanctuary Cities will battle this to the absolute DEATH
    I tend to agree.

    If you want to have civilized, you have to WANT to have civilized.

    Cali in all their smug progressive self-righteousness feels it has grown beyond all that.

    I say let them have their feelings - which they will do until they don't.

    Dobbin
    I hinnire propter hoc ecce ego

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    Quote Originally Posted by Melodi View Post
    Because, among other things, it won't stay on the West Coast (or in New York), if past situations are any guide the more temperate areas and the areas thought to have some employment will get massive homeless problems first.

    But like the "Reaganvilles" of the early 1980s recession (yep they existed) if nothing is done and current trends continue, especially if there is a sudden drop from good employment back to massive layoffs (as happened in the early 1980s) other cities from Denver to Willmington are going to have versions of the same problem.

    This time with children freezing to death in "snow approved" sleeping bags as happened in Denver when I lived there.

    I think the Trump Administration (or someone in it, possibly Dr. Carson himself) realizes the potential for this and is trying to be proactive about it - the fact that it gives them a chance to punch some political enemies in the figurative eye just adds icing on the cake for them.
    Oh yes, always for "the children".

    The children should be put in fostercare. Period. If the parent(s) ever come out from the drug/mental illness fugue and get a job then they can have them back.

    Set up tent cities away from populated areas with intensive counseling for AODA and mental health issues. Most cannot be healed, but it keeps them from heaping their issues on their children and prevents another generation of the same.
    Sub-Zero

  16. #16
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    After President Trump finds the solution and cleans up the mess in San Francisco and Los Angeles I doubt neither Gov. Newsom nor Nancy Pelosi or any other Democrat for that matter will have the grace to say, "Thank You".

  17. #17
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    My first thought is that Constitutionally, this is a state or local legal responsibility.

    Still, there are aspects of this issue that approach valid Federal concerns.

    Epidemic disease would be tops.
    National defense would be another, though a bit of a stretch til it worsens or there is a hotter war nearby.
    Proud member Alt-Right group "Scientists For Trump". (Smart Americans know he's right.)
    A man should only take a wife whose Bible includes Genesis, Leviticus, Deuteronomy, Colossians, Malachi, Isaiah, Ephesians, Corinthians, Hebrews, Timothy, Titus, Proverbs, Mark, Peter & Revelation. Ecclesiastes 7:28 (NIV) tells him the odds.

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Sub-Zero View Post
    Oh yes, always for "the children".

    The children should be put in fostercare. Period. If the parent(s) ever come out from the drug/mental illness fugue and get a job then they can have them back.

    Set up tent cities away from populated areas with intensive counseling for AODA and mental health issues. Most cannot be healed, but it keeps them from heaping their issues on their children and prevents another generation of the same.
    I didn't say that you did - the situation in Denver was typical at the time - a family was trying to go from their home area where there was no employment (the plant shut down) towards California were at the time there was work.

    The car broke down in Denver outside of a cafe which agreed to employee both parents but they were not allowed to bring the kids inside.

    The family did contact social services to see if they could get any help but was told because they were married and the husband was with the family there was NO aid available unless he was willing to abandon them.

    The father went to Goodwill with his first tips (not even salary) and bought the sleeping bags for the little boys and he checked on them every hour, snow fell and they died.

    The County Prosecutor tried very hard NOT to bring charges because he said: "it was the saddest case he had ever seen, these people were trying to do the right thing and the system failed them."

    That is simply putting a human face on a real story; children and custody among the homeless should be looked at as individual cases - families like the above need family shelters even if it is in a camp.

    Children whose parents have drugged-out zombies or street bum level alcoholics are better off in foster care or more likely orphanages.

    The Foster System is already so broken down that suddenly being impacted with hundreds or even thousands of children will require orphanages.

    Again, you can do triage and sort people, the answer for everyone and everywhere will not be the same.

    But the prospects of epidemic disease and other problems are REAL, and what I did say was "it won't stay on the West Coast."

    I did not say "it's for the children..." although even in 1989 they were there, and if it had been 1889 I'd have had a daughter but that's another story for another time.
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by MinnesotaSmith View Post
    My first thought is that Constitutionally, this is a state or local legal responsibility.

    Still, there are aspects of this issue that approach valid Federal concerns.

    Epidemic disease would be tops.
    National defense would be another, though a bit of a stretch til it worsens or there is a hotter war nearby.
    It's no twist whatsoever..... to suggest this is intentional by the core politicians, meant to degrade and destroy and keep the serfs down. When one considers the absolute truth behind that statement as well as the democrat parties blatant disregard for our Constitution. Trumps actions can be seen from the basis of national security, the enemy within, the fifth column. So yes, intrude by all means.

  20. #20
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    When California's pestholes become a front-line public health concern...incubating diseases like resistant TB, plague and leprosy, the Feds have a role.

  21. #21
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    so we get to pay for
    "His golden colored hair and beard gave to his appearance a celestial aspect, His eyes grey clear. He came from racial lines which had blue eyes and golden hair. This granted unlimited freedom provoked the Jews, Jesus of Nazareth spoke rather as a friend of the Romans than of the Jews." http://www.thenazareneway.com/likene...ur_saviour.htm

  22. #22
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    so we get to pay for
    If there is a well-administered Federal program done under Trump (he is a builder after all), it would be far cheaper than any Democrat boondoggle program done locally in any State.

    Of course, when the Dems get back in power, they can just reverse it all.

    Stacked Container homes are cheap and can be put in large unused lots with public transportation going to them, so some people who want to, can get to a job. Can't really damage them either, and there are lots of them for sale in coastal cities which can be converted for much less than conventional apartments.
    True North Strong and Free

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinkelsteinsmom View Post
    so we get to pay for
    We're already paying for it, and are getting more arguably because of it.

    With counties out here in CA paying out as much as $80K per head annually on the homeless and not making a dent in the problem, to say in these "blue" zip codes this issue is tailor made to beat the DNC power structure about the head and shoulders is an understatement. The amount of federal money that the state and local governments are ineffectually spending to address this crisis gives the Feds as a stakeholder a say in the problem above and beyond public health and the national security aspects of public health and a breakdown in local law and order. All politics are local and this crisis is bigger on the local level than the backlash to local governments in the snowbelt that can't clear the roads in a timely fashion. This opens doors not normally available to address the local and state Dem hegemonic power structures, such as audits of agencies spending Federal funds earmarked to address homelessness. The Dems may well find themselves in a very "interesting" situation seeing as they are the ones constantly making any emergency a political issue.

    That being said, the options available to HHS to meaningfully make an impact on the ground are going to be fought by the local PTB is a given. If you think the tempest stirred up over the illegal alien detention facilities was bad, you haven't seen anything yet.

  24. #24
    One tiny piece of the puzzle I have yet to see clearly articulated is that many of the homeless do indeed have options. Those options often require behavioral changes, though, so are left off the solutions list by the person.

    I can't imagine, at this point, what an elected official or professional do gooder is able to say in defense of the current system, nor how they look themselves in the mirror, or sleep soundly at night.

    This system's stench is as abhorant and obviously toxic as the perforated bowels, raped, beaten, burned people we'd fight our way through forrests to find. Until the talking heads have paid their dues in blood, vomit, and tears that come with actually struggling with the human costs their polotics have wrought, they've no right to speak. Indeed I would think their shame so heavy they could not.

    Im proud of the Oregonian folk and others who're drawing lines, finally. God bless them. We can do better by one another. How about foster care for the fragile?. Never heard of it? Don't feel bad, I just made it up...but it shows if we care, and are committed, there are untapped solutions to be found. Swing pendulum swing!
    Thoughts are things. Thus I'm careful of the thoughts I think, & the company I keep.
    I myself am entirely made of flaws, stiched together with good intentions.
    MOON™~> all in the ignorant opinion of an uneducated slip of a woman who keeps forgetting to mind her manners, know her place and bow down to her betters

  25. #25
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    The destruction of mental heath care facilities back in the 1970's to save tax dollars has helped to create the problems with homelessness.....

    The mental health conditions have to be addressed to help fix homelessness....

    Texican....

  26. #26
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    A radio program I recently listened to, said one large cause of the homeless in some of our western cities, is because of the Chinese moving in and buying up the houses....that increases housing prices, down the line. This will keep spreading.

  27. #27
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    he's definitely goading them into addressing the problem, just like Baltimore and that Cummins creep.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michiana MaJo View Post
    A radio program I recently listened to, said one large cause of the homeless in some of our western cities, is because of the Chinese moving in and buying up the houses....that increases housing prices, down the line. This will keep spreading.
    This doesn't surprise me one bit, and haven't they been doing this since Clinton was in office and he aided them in purchasing properties?
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  29. #29
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    The Dr. Zhivago solution...

    Simple as it is amusing to envision:

    Just designate 3/4ths of any California Democratic officeholder's dwelling(s) as "communal living", and let anyone who can pay 5 bucks a night (in bottles, shoplifted goods, or drugs, not just in money) live there. Describe it as a continuing of Obama's HUD push to eliminate single-family zoning nationwide, and they'll hardly dare peep.

    (It's not as if they're going to be Constitutionally-aware enough to know about Bills of Attainder.)
    Proud member Alt-Right group "Scientists For Trump". (Smart Americans know he's right.)
    A man should only take a wife whose Bible includes Genesis, Leviticus, Deuteronomy, Colossians, Malachi, Isaiah, Ephesians, Corinthians, Hebrews, Timothy, Titus, Proverbs, Mark, Peter & Revelation. Ecclesiastes 7:28 (NIV) tells him the odds.

  30. #30
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    Melodi, I remember when they "cleaned out" the Tenderloin District in SF in the 1980s and built a huge hotel there. The street people just moved down to the financial district and we had to step over them getting to work.

    The problem is not just in big cities and has a lot to do with addiction. Problem with shelters is that you generally must stay clean and sober there and females and children have to be kept separate from men to protect against predation. Some of that has to do with protecting the neighborhood and the facility residents, some with insurance. For the most part, addicts and alcoholics don't want to change their lifestyles.

    The tweakers steal anything that isn't nailed down - even in the small rural towns along I-5. The problem is all over.
    "During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." George Orwell

  31. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by Melodi View Post
    While banning sleeping on the streets makes city councils feels good and assures the public that they are "doing something," what happens in practice is that yep they tear down a few camps, scatter people ot the winds but since they have nowhere else to go the tents just move down the street or have returned two weeks later.

    City Jails only have so much room and I suspect 60,000 people would rather strain even as large as the one for LA County.

    You have to have someplace for people actually to go, which is almost never the case; even San Francsico admitted they LIED about that before scattering the population in front of City Hall.

    That simply moved the problem to the doorways of businesses, the front steps of apartment blocks and destroyed the city parks (as the homeless moved there).

    I don't have an easy solution, but just banning people who have no place to go from sleeping there is like telling people without option it is illegal to go to the bathroom, both are going to happen anyway.

    The "camp" idea could work but only if it used carrots and sticks, it would have to be set up in some way so as not to be another form of jail.

    I mean yeah, you could call out the National Guard to move 60,000 people but where do they move them too?

    I have never yet seen a situation where the "where to move them to" problem was solved before the "media" was called in to "view" and "report" that the city was "cleaning things ups" by bulldozing the camps.

    I'd love to see a situation where some decent alternatives (including for the mentally ill) were put in place first, before trying to "move people along."
    How about the homes & yards of the democrat leaders. Move them there, and set out cases of TP, let them pop up tents there, and let them shit all over the place.
    "No one ever rescues an old dog. They lay in a cage until they die. PLEASE save one. None of us wants to die cold and alone... --Dennis Olson "

    Si vis pacem, para bellum

  32. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by Laurane View Post
    If there is a well-administered Federal program done under Trump (he is a builder after all), it would be far cheaper than any Democrat boondoggle program done locally in any State.

    Of course, when the Dems get back in power, they can just reverse it all.

    Stacked Container homes are cheap and can be put in large unused lots with public transportation going to them, so some people who want to, can get to a job. Can't really damage them either, and there are lots of them for sale in coastal cities which can be converted for much less than conventional apartments.
    An idea worth exploring !
    "No one ever rescues an old dog. They lay in a cage until they die. PLEASE save one. None of us wants to die cold and alone... --Dennis Olson "

    Si vis pacem, para bellum

  33. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by NoDandy View Post
    How about the homes & yards of the democrat leaders. Move them there, and set out cases of TP, let them pop up tents there, and let them shit all over the place.
    While such statements along with the Dr. Zivago "solution" are fun to state and all that, they are not actually going to happen and everyone knows this (except maybe as a protest).

    I've started to write about three times and quit about the different types of homelessness but I just can't get it short enough so I won't.

    What I will say is that the problem isn't all one set or type of people, and the causes are not the same either.

    Folks like my friend who nearly ended up in a tent with her dying husband are affected when huge amounts of the local housing are owned by foreign "investors" and not even rented out, they also are affected when there simply isn't any public housing or shelters they can go to (rules or not).

    Other folks, really are mentally ill, seriously addicted to drugs or booze and they have a totally different set of "needs" and potential "solutions."

    The first group (when you can properly vet them and sort them out) really does just need a bit of help; a place to live, perhaps medical care, food and maybe a work-fare job if they are not the caregiver for a family member the State would otherwise have to care for.

    The rest are a totally different kettle of fish and need a totally different sort of "structured" place, especially the mentally ill.

    Personally I'm all in favor of legalizing the drugs, but a person would have to register as an addict and then take them under visual supervision (at the hostel, camp or whatever) so they wouldn't have to steal to support their habits but they couldn't sell the drugs either.

    But that's me and details like that can be worked out.

    But not everything is just one thing, there are lots of apples, oranges and even pineapples in the homeless mix.
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  34. #34
    Headline when Trump's President:
    Trump Orders Crackdown On California Homelessness

    Headline if Obama was President"
    President Obama seeks to solve homeless crisis in any humane way possible

  35. #35
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    Fair use from OP.
    Trump’s executive order created a new White House council on eliminating “regulatory barriers” increasing the cost of building new housing, a move aimed at expanding the housing supply and driving down prices.
    The NIMBY progressive Democrats in their expensive, exclusive area homes should be in full panic mode in 5...4....3....
    Last edited by Old Gray Mare; 09-11-2019 at 07:09 PM. Reason: spelling
    Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it. - Mark Twain

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by MinnesotaSmith View Post
    My first thought is that Constitutionally, this is a state or local legal responsibility.

    Still, there are aspects of this issue that approach valid Federal concerns.

    Epidemic disease would be tops.
    National defense would be another, though a bit of a stretch til it worsens or there is a hotter war nearby.
    Would this fall under Trump State of Emergency regarding National Security? Because I'm thinking "OUTBREAK."

    This was purposely done by the deep state in CA. They WANT the diseases to spread!
    My Message to the Fake Stream Media......
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  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buick Electra View Post
    Would this fall under Trump State of Emergency regarding National Security? Because I'm thinking "OUTBREAK."

    This was purposely done by the deep state in CA. They WANT the diseases to spread!
    They don't have to. Really. Why bother? They can just sit back and let nature take it's coarse. Remember Flutrackers.com tracked the swine flu up the Cali coast from Mexico?

    Now that hopping the southern US boarder has become an international sport I believe we can expect and should expect and be prepared for emerging diseases from around the world, especially those from third word countries.
    Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it. - Mark Twain

  38. #38
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    delete
    Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it. - Mark Twain

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Old Gray Mare View Post
    Fair use from OP.

    Trump’s executive order created a new White House council on eliminating “regulatory barriers” increasing the cost of building new housing, a move aimed at expanding the housing supply and driving down prices.

    The NIMBY progressive Democrats in their expensive, exclusive area homes should be in full panic mode in 5...4....3....
    Thing is, the Obama Administration was doing something like that. Only, their approach was to effectively work on ending single-family-only zoning, so that NO place could be diverse-thug/welfare queen free. Not only would there soon be multistory projects of Dindus and 6-household pickaninnies/La Razans to rob and beat up your kids at the bus stop every day, your house value (but not your mortgage) would instantly plummet by >60%. Not so great a thing.
    Proud member Alt-Right group "Scientists For Trump". (Smart Americans know he's right.)
    A man should only take a wife whose Bible includes Genesis, Leviticus, Deuteronomy, Colossians, Malachi, Isaiah, Ephesians, Corinthians, Hebrews, Timothy, Titus, Proverbs, Mark, Peter & Revelation. Ecclesiastes 7:28 (NIV) tells him the odds.

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