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GUNS/RLTD I tried to buy a gun at Walmart twice, and roadblocks left me empty-handed both times (Long)
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  1. #1

    I tried to buy a gun at Walmart twice, and roadblocks left me empty-handed both times (Long)

    Her plans for another fake story didn't work out.

    https://www.businessinsider.com/walm...y-seriously-13


    I tried to buy a gun at Walmart twice, and roadblocks left me empty-handed both times
    Hayley Peterson

    19-24 minutes
    Walmart


    The availability of guns at Walmart has become a hotly debated issue in the wake of two deadly shootings at its stores that killed 24 people.

    More than 128,000 people have signed a petition urging Walmart to stop selling guns and take a stronger stance against firearms since the shootings at stores in El Paso, Texas, and Southaven, Mississippi. But the company has said it has no plans to stop selling them.

    I went to Walmart with the intention of buying a gun last week as part of an investigation into the placement, selection, marketing, and security of firearms in Walmart's stores, and to learn more about the retailer's processes governing gun sales.

    My journey to bring a gun home from Walmart turned out to be far more complicated than I expected.

    I hit a roadblock before I even left the house.

    Walmart has said that about half of its 4,700 US stores sell guns.

    I searched Walmart.com and Google on August 13 to find out which of the 10 Walmart stores near me sold guns, and I failed to come up with any definitive answers.

    The only guns advertised on Walmart's website are air guns. After about 30 minutes, I gave up on searching the internet and turned to the phone.

    I figured that employees at any one of Walmart's stores near me would know which locations sold guns.

    I was wrong.

    Over an hour and a half, I placed more than a dozen calls to multiple stores, waited on hold for a combined 40 minutes, and got through to a human only three times. Three Walmart employees told me they didn't know which stores sold guns in the area.

    One person referred me to Walmart's main customer-service line. I called that number and spoke with someone who said he also couldn't help me.

    "When it comes to item availability, they don't want us to discuss that because of various reasons," he said.

    He declined to elaborate on this and said he knew of at least one location near me that didn't sell guns.

    I crossed that store off my list.

    The customer-service representative advised me to call each store individually to find out whether it sold guns. When I told him that I had spent more than an hour doing just that and that several stores weren't answering the phone, he said I could file a report with him concerning problems with specific locations. This was not helpful.

    After hours of Googling and calling, I finally had a breakthrough and found a Walmart store that sold guns.

    Someone answered the phone at a Walmart Supercenter in Chesterfield, Virginia.

    She transferred me to the sporting-goods department, where a woman on the line confirmed that I could buy a gun there.

    The store was 30 minutes away. I got in my car and plugged the address for the Chesterfield Walmart into my phone.

    (Later, when I contacted Walmart's media-relations team about my difficulty locating a store that sold firearms, a spokesman pointed me to the website for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives, which maintains a list of all gun retailers by state.)

    When I arrived, I looked for the sporting-goods department. I found it about 100 steps from the closest entrance to the store.

    On my way to the department, I walked past shelves of school supplies, the toy department, and the bike shop.

    I spotted guns on display directly under the sign for the department.

    A selection of about 20 rifles and shotguns was displayed in a locked glass case behind the sporting-goods counter. The guns ranged in price from $159 to $474.

    The counter in front of the guns displayed pocket knives, binoculars, and digital night-vision monoculars inside a locked case.

    The selection of guns was limited compared with nearby gun stores, which offered dozens of different kinds of firearms, including handguns.

    Walmart stopped selling handguns in the 1990s and removed semiautomatic rifles, such as the AR-15, from stores in 2015.

    In prepared remarks last week, Walmart CEO Doug McMillon outlined some other Walmart gun-sales policies that go beyond federal requirements.

    For example, Walmart last year raised the minimum age to purchase a gun or ammunition to 21. Walmart also sells a firearm only after receiving a "green light" on a background check, while federal law requires only the absence of a "red light" after three business days, he said.

    "We videotape the point of sale for firearms, only allow certain associates to sell firearms, and secure firearms in a locking case with individual locks, among other measures," McMillon said.
    I told an employee behind the counter that I wanted to buy a gun. They called for a manager.

    Signs posted around the counter announced that all firearm and ammunition sales were final and that items could not be returned or exchanged for a refund or repair.

    One sign warned that this area of the store was being recorded. Another reminded shoppers of the laws around gun sales.

    There were no signs promoting or advertising the guns.

    Walmart faced backlash on social media this month over a photo of a gun display in one of its stores with a sign hanging overhead that said "Own the school year like a hero."

    Walmart said that photo, which was from 2017 but had resurfaced online, was a prank staged by a non-employee.

    While I waited, I browsed the supply of air guns near the firearm-sales counter.

    Air guns, pellet guns, and BB guns use air to propel projectiles such as pellets.

    I also browsed the shelves of ammunition. Walmart said recently that it accounted for about 2% of all gun sales and 20% of ammunition sales in the US.

    "We estimate that we represent about 2% of the market for firearms today, which we believe places us outside at least the top three sellers in the industry," McMillon said in prepared remarks last week.

    After a few minutes, a Walmart manager arrived at the gun-sales counter. She said I could not buy a gun that day because no authorized firearm sellers were scheduled to work.

    She said I could come back to buy a gun on Thursday, two days later.

    A Walmart spokesman later told me that to sell firearms, employees must pass both an enhanced criminal background check and annual online training, provided by Walmart, that includes a mock gun transaction.

    Walmart also complies with state-specific requirements where applicable. Illinois, for example, requires people who sell guns to have a firearm-owner identification card, issued by state police.
    Before I left the store, the manager offered to remove a rifle from the case for me to inspect.

    I asked to look at the cheapest one. It cost $159.

    When she unlocked the case, I noticed that the rifles were strung together with a metal cord. Each rifle was secured to the cord with plastic zip ties.

    The manager cut a zip tie to remove the rifle, and immediately replaced it with a new zip tie when she returned it to the case.

    After inspecting the rifle, I left the store and told her I would return two days later.

    On Thursday, I drove another 30 minutes to Chesterfield, confident that I would successfully purchase a firearm that day.

    I arrived at the sporting-goods department around noon.

    There was no one attending the counter by the firearms. After waiting for about 10 minutes, I walked to another aisle and found someone to help me.

    I told her I wanted to buy a gun. She said she was an authorized seller and that she could help me. We walked back to the gun display, where she picked up a phone and called someone.

    "Can you meet at the front to help me with a gun sale?" she said into the phone. She turned to me and said she needed help to ensure the sale process was completed correctly.

    She charged me $2 for a federal background check, then left the counter and returned a few minutes later with a form titled "Department of State Police Virginia Firearms Transaction Record."

    She told me to complete the form.

    I started filling out the necessary paperwork to buy a gun.

    The form asked several obvious questions: my name, address, and Social Security number. It also asked about my race, gender, and US citizenship status.

    Under a section called "certification of transferee," it asked about my criminal record — whether I had ever been convicted of a felony, subject to a restraining order, or prohibited from purchasing a firearm, among other specifics.

    In red print, the form said that "an untruthful answer may subject you to criminal prosecution."

    The seller told me that my background check would likely be completed within a few minutes after I finished the paperwork. Once the purchase was finalized, an employee would walk the gun out to my car with me.

    But I had only just finished printing my name when she stopped me and asked whether the address on my license matched my home address. I had moved since I obtained my license, and the addresses didn't match.

    That was a problem, she said.

    To pass the background check, I would need to bring in a government-issued document with my correct address, such as a bill from a state-owned utility or a car registration. (I have never bought a gun, so I wasn't aware of this.)

    She apologized, told me the rules were strict around background checks, and asked me to come back another time to finish the purchase.

    I left the store empty-handed — again.

    At this point, I decided to give up on buying a gun at Walmart.

    I had invested several hours across two days on this. If I were actually in the market for a rifle, I would have gone to a local gun shop instead after about five minutes of trying to figure out which Walmart stores sold guns.

    Overall, the experience left me with the impression that buying a gun at Walmart is more complicated than I expected, and that Walmart takes gun sales and security pretty seriously.

    Here's what led to that impression:
    Walmart does not make it easy to figure out which stores sell guns.
    The firearms at Walmart were locked inside a case and secured to one another with zip ties attached to a metal cord.
    Only certain employees can open the case and handle the firearms. These include sporting-goods associates or salaried managers who have passed both an enhanced background check and online training provided by Walmart, the company told me. The store employees abided by these rules while I was there.
    When I asked to purchase a gun, the Walmart employee who was authorized to sell guns called for backup to make sure the process was completed correctly.
    Walmart refused to sell me a gun when an authorized seller wasn't present and when the address on my license didn't match my home address, even though those issues could mean a lost sale.
    There were no advertising materials or promotions in the store to lure people to buy guns.
    My experience could also help explain Walmart's relatively small share of the US gun-sales market, despite the company's size and reach.

    The selection of firearms at the Walmart store I visited was extremely limited compared with other stores nearby that focus solely on selling guns.

    A Walmart spokesman said my experience supported what the company has said about the sales of firearms in its stores.

    "In areas of the country where we sell firearms, we have a long-standing commitment to do so safely and in a compliant manner," the spokesman, Randy Hargrove, said.
    Last edited by Dennis Olson; 08-22-2019 at 01:42 PM. Reason: cleaned up formatting somewhat

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    In A Basket Of Deplorables
    Posts
    10,035
    Once again, that pesky "reality" thing gets in the way of a Lefty's fantasy narrative. But that won't stop them from continuing to push all kinds of fabulist nonsense in their quest to create their utopia. While I share the general opinion that no one would or should be happy about kinetic civil conflict, I would nevertheless be happy if the one we're expecting arrives sooner rather than later, so we can get it over with and get on with establishing anew a free society.
    E Deploribus Unum

    Oderint dum metuant

    Every day is a JDAM day

  3. #3
    sorry but there's all kinds of activity that you can't get done without adequate ID ...
    Illini Warrior

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    3,546
    I imagine if the snowflake would have gone to a gun store, they would not have sold her one either due the difference in address'.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    Oklahoma
    Posts
    2,523
    why darn
    I knew about that pesky address verification thing years ago.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Illini Warrior View Post
    sorry but there's all kinds of activity that you can't get done without adequate ID ...
    And than there's voting....

  7. #7
    A few years ago I purchased a shotgun in Academe and used my CHL to do the buy. They then carried the gun out to my car while I had my carry gun on me. I pointed the stupidity of the whole exercise and the employee just shook his head.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by teedee View Post
    A few years ago I purchased a shotgun in Academe and used my CHL to do the buy. They then carried the gun out to my car while I had my carry gun on me. I pointed the stupidity of the whole exercise and the employee just shook his head.
    Had the same thing happen at Wal Mart.It had to be a manager,i asked him if he wanted to carry my loaded pistol as well,i believe he may have needed a change of under ware.Also Wal Mart will not sell a gun and ammo at the same time.They bug me by always adding their own set of requirements On top of the law.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
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    Northeast Missouri
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    She charged me $2 for a federal background check,

    Wait a minute... Walmart is charging $2 for a FREE NICS check? No wonder the Waltons are raking in $70 mil per minute. I haven't made a 4473 purchase ever where the dealer charged me for a NICS check (unless it was already figured into the purchase price). Are there any FFL's who can talk about this?

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    Don't remember where exactly-maybe Pa. or Az. but they had to tote the ammo to the front sidewalk before I could take it the rest of the way.
    "It ain't no secret I didn't get these scars falling over in church."


    "My Shoes are too Tight. But it is ok as I have forgotten how to Dance."

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Satanta View Post
    Don't remember where exactly-maybe Pa. or Az. but they had to tote the ammo to the front sidewalk before I could take it the rest of the way.



    If I'm not wrong thats Walmart policy with every store they have.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Wisconsin
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    1,883
    I emailed her and asked her to please try the gun store next and write an article on that experience.

    She seems to think that will be easier than Wallyworld....

    Think I will ever hear back from her??

    hpeterson@businessinsider.com

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Behind Enemy Lines
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    172,719
    I sent her this:


    Good day

    I read with interest your Business Insider essay on trying to buy a gun at Walmart. Each time I read a similar piece, I can’t help but think what a fantasy world liberals inhabit regarding guns. From what I’ve read over the years, there are two primary misconceptions under which liberals operate:

    1) Buying a gun is as easy as getting a soda out of a vending machine

    2) A gun will turn a lifelong pacifist onto a slavering mass killer

    I’m not at all sure why these points drive the liberal mind on guns, since both are patently false. I’ll not try to convince you otherwise, since as my oldest friend used to say, never try to teach a pig to sing; it wastes your time and annoys the pig.

    In any event, I hope you learned a little something about the truth vs. liberal fiction surrounding gun purchases. Perhaps it’s a good thing you weren’t able to make that purchase; gun ownership is a serious responsibility (at least to those of us who are of sound mind), and I’d hate to read about you being arrested for a mass shooting (smile).

    Kind regards,

    Dennis

  14. #14
    Join Date
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    N. Minnesota
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    Either this woman (author) is terminally naive and stupid, or she dumbed down the experience for her intended readers. Intended or not, I guess she made her point...after a painful long danged dull story.

    I hope she realizes all gun stores would run her through basically the same hoops? She gets a big FAIL in her research and basic knowledge of the law.

  15. #15
    Walmart is no longer a great place to buy a gun, and I know that also from personal experience. The last time I purchased a gun (a bolt action single shot rifle for use with the Boy Scouts years ago) there, it took over an hour to complete the transaction. The background check, slow service, etc., all added up. It's a whole lot better to use a local shop that specializes in selling firearms. They give much better and quicker service.

    It also helps to have a carry permit, which in my state does away with the need for a background check - and that really does speed things up. But it's a shame that there are such things as federal background checks - they're totally unconstitutional.

    There are already too many infringements on our basic human rights in this country (the most basic of which is the right to self defense, for which the firearm is currently the best tool for that job). ALL federal firearms laws that have ever been written and passed should be repealed, because ALL of them are unconstitutional. The federal government has no business regulating the tools of self defense, period.

  16. #16
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    texas
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    1,642
    Quote Originally Posted by teedee View Post
    A few years ago I purchased a shotgun in Academe and used my CHL to do the buy. They then carried the gun out to my car while I had my carry gun on me. I pointed the stupidity of the whole exercise and the employee just shook his head.
    Look at it this way. They don't have to sell guns but choose to in a litigious and highly regulated enviroment. Ammunition is openly available on the shelf so they are most likely walking the gun out of the store for insurance purposes. I've got no problem with that.
    corruptissima re publica plurimae leges

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldotaku View Post
    She charged me $2 for a federal background check,

    Wait a minute... Walmart is charging $2 for a FREE NICS check? No wonder the Waltons are raking in $70 mil per minute. I haven't made a 4473 purchase ever where the dealer charged me for a NICS check (unless it was already figured into the purchase price). Are there any FFL's who can talk about this?
    Someone answered the phone at a Walmart Supercenter in Chesterfield, Virginia.

    She transferred me to the sporting-goods department, where a woman on the line confirmed that I could buy a gun there.
    It's a state of Virginia mandated check that costs $2. The 4473 ones are free.
    https://gun.laws.com/state-gun-laws/virginia-gun-laws

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