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Misc August 31st Poolside Chat
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  1. #1
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    August 31st Poolside Chat

    That's not a typo, between passing kidney stones and now I have shingles I'm wiped out! So I'm extending this chat to the 31st.

    The dog days of summer are officially here, college students are moving back into town which means a huge fabric sale at the local quilt shop, it's one of the largest ones in the area. So I may have to check out the sales this week with my bestie.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  2. #2
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Baa1NxXrfc
    15:15 run time

    Guerilla Hexies. Was going to run out of pricey glue sticks, so resorted to sewing. Takes practice, and takes longer per hexie, but I get better results. I may change my mind once faced with pulling out all those basting threads... We'll see. I need a better pair of small sharp scissors, and would rather spend money on tools than supplies that get used up. One of the fabrics I bought from MSQC is a Moda French floral stripe (Vive la France), and the blue background is that indigo tint. Just LOVE THAT specific shade. Sublime - can't explain why. Makes me want to get back into real fermented indigo, and cut quilt fabric from my own hand-dyes.

    While basting, I've been listening to many of this lady's videos. She is a spinner, quilter, knitter, and also an aspiring potter. She is also a bit of a Cat Lady. Above is a link to a pottery video, but most of the ones I've looked at are about quilting, or where she just chats about her garden, and winds up a ball of home spun yarn, or something. Very low-key, but I enjoy them.
    Last edited by Faroe; 08-10-2019 at 06:49 PM.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Faroe View Post
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Baa1NxXrfc
    15:15 run time

    Guerilla Hexies. Was going to run out of pricey glue sticks, so resorted to sewing. Takes practice, and takes longer per hexie, but I get better results. I may change my mind once faced with pulling out all those basting threads... We'll see. I need a better pair of small sharp scissors, and would rather spend money on tools than supplies that get used up. One of the fabrics I bought from MSQC is a Moda French floral stripe, and the blue background is that indigo tint. Just LOVE THAT specific shade. Sublime - can't explain why. Makes me want to get back into real fermented indigo, and cut quilt fabric from my own hand-dyes.

    While basting, I've been listening to many of this lady's videos. She is a spinner, quilter, knitter, and also an aspiring potter. She is also a bit of a Cat Lady. Above is a link to a pottery video, but most of the ones I've looked at are about quilting, or where she just chats about her garden, and winds up a ball of home spun yarn, or something. Very low-key, but I enjoy them.
    I never pull my basting threads, but I don't sew into the paper either. I'm probably doing it the hard way.

    thank you for the link.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  4. #4
    One of the videos I watched showed them sewn like that. The narrator said it works well for small hexies, but larger ones might require some stitches through the paper along the straight edges.

    My hexies are 1 1/2" along each side. The fabric patch remains much too loose if I just tack the corners closed. I'm not currently working with starch, and I don't iron as I go - which might make that method more successful. Ironing only happens with a stack of finished shapes/blocks/etc. once a day, outside on the porch. Can't have a hot Teflon base iron around pet birds - toxic (have to wonder what it does to us). A new non-Teflon iron isn't in the budget for a while.

    It may be that while many more smaller hexies can look very impressive in a quilt, they are actually more efficient to put together than the clumbsier big ones. From what I've gathered, the "traditional" size is more like 1" along a side; maybe for good reason?

  5. #5
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    Slogging through 3 quilting projects until the end of the month.

    (1) Continuation of the ruler work 365 day challenge
    (2) Bag for my daughter - pieces are quilted a cut, stay stitched on the edges and under assembly
    (3) Start the Dream Big dahlia quilt along. Supplies purchased next step is basting the sandwich

    This week I start picking up grand kids after school so my daughter can work full days. That will bi-sect my days and make projects more difficult or could be a nice break in the day.
    "During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." George Orwell

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Faroe View Post
    One of the videos I watched showed them sewn like that. The narrator said it works well for small hexies, but larger ones might require some stitches through the paper along the straight edges.

    My hexies are 1 1/2" along each side. The fabric patch remains much too loose if I just tack the corners closed. I'm not currently working with starch, and I don't iron as I go - which might make that method more successful. Ironing only happens with a stack of finished shapes/blocks/etc. once a day, outside on the porch. Can't have a hot Teflon base iron around pet birds - toxic (have to wonder what it does to us). A new non-Teflon iron isn't in the budget for a while.

    It may be that while many more smaller hexies can look very impressive in a quilt, they are actually more efficient to put together than the clumbsier big ones. From what I've gathered, the "traditional" size is more like 1" along a side; maybe for good reason?
    My iron is from the fifties and has a solid base, no holes.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  7. #7
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    I found some of my larger hexies I’ve basted, they’re two inches along the sides. I didn’t baste them to the paper and can guarantee you I didn’t iron any of them outside of finger pressing an occasional difficult edge. Never knew we were supposed to do these steps. I then baste them all together and OC removes the papers for me to reuse. I add wool batting, the black Michael Miller cotton couture fabric, baste the layers together and then hand stitch, I don’t even use a frame for stitching. I hire out the binding process, usually runs around $75 for a small quilt.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  8. #8
    A couple of more Dead Easy hats done, Husband has decided he likes the mock cable variation - a great small project while waiting for the new medications to stabilize (which they are) I will probably keep making a couple more of these during World Con (starts Wednesday) and after it is over start looking into things like da "Sweater O Cat Pee" or at least switching to socks.

    Husband also wants some "glintens" (shooters mittens) so I may try some regular ones first as I think we have run out - another almost mindless (but does need some attention) and small.
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Melodi View Post
    A couple of more Dead Easy hats done, Husband has decided he likes the mock cable variation - a great small project while waiting for the new medications to stabilize (which they are) I will probably keep making a couple more of these during World Con (starts Wednesday) and after it is over start looking into things like da "Sweater O Cat Pee" or at least switching to socks.

    Husband also wants some "glintens" (shooters mittens) so I may try some regular ones first as I think we have run out - another almost mindless (but does need some attention) and small.
    Melodi, are those the mittens that have the mitten flap that flips over the glove that has fingers knitted to the knuckle? BF wants a pair. I could probably wing it, but would rather a pattern. Haven't found quite the right one yet.

  10. #10
    Mayan Chickens:

    These are a common theme in Guatemalan weaving, and I used to incorporate a version of them in cross stitch. Was going through an old tub of various needle projects, and found a bunch of old stuff I'd completely forgotten about, inc. a lap size quilt/embriodery of mayan chickens. It is even double sided, with a coordinating motif on the back. I also found a a few small whole cloth quilted pieces that are far and away better than anything I've done since - one sort of a chrysanthemum theme, and the other is Welsh style, and very densely quilted. I have only the vaguest memory of stitching these out in the yard. A Flowers for Algernon moment...what the Hell happened? My own brain seems to be degenerating along with the rest of the modern world.

    Well carry on, I guess, it is what it is.

  11. #11
    The Shooter's Mittens are just a thumb and Index finger; I think once I used an actual pattern and the other time I used the Mitten and Glove Patterns from a Knitters Handy Book of Patterns, just only added the one extra finger.

    I haven't tried the flip over ones with the fingerless gloves but I may at some point, I'd want a pattern for that too or at least the fingerless gloves part.

    If I notice something I'll try to post it in the pattern section.
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  12. #12
    Not sure what the next project will be. Still making making blocks, but that doesn't really have a direction.
    Placed an order for a couple of inexpensive books, some Aurifil thread, and a couple of better tools. Then, got very angry and cancelled the whole thing.
    **** it, I'll just use what i have. Grrr.

  13. #13
    I have a stack of nine patch blocks that would finish out to 6" squares. I'll only need several more to have enough for a smalllish quilt, if arranged on the diagonal with plain 6" blocks in Irish Chain. Am thinking of simple applique flowers for those plain blocks, probably in the same blue fabrics. Will make up a few sample blocks, and see how they turn out. Not sure about the method - freezer paper and starch?, back basting? ...given that ironing here is a bit of a PITA, I'll start out at least, with the back basting. I'm envisioning simple daisy-type flowers, anyway.

    Am getting a little bored with hand sewing all the nine-patches; my intersections turn out perfectly every time, so am just "over" that challenge. Will be using up every last bit of the lovely Andover Chrysanthemum light tan created by Edinta Sitar - a delicate, subtle, and old-fashioned print that is the background for most of the bolder dark blue florals. Have also been using a solid light tan. Effect is rather scrappy, but still attractive.

  14. #14
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    I finally got a small order of hemp in, so am working on orders of hemp soap bags. Hemp has become extremely hard to find, and it's my best online seller by far. And I just found out that the guy I usually get it from is trying to sell his business. This small order I got was from someone else, but it turns out that he actually bought it from my usual guy and I got the last of what this one had - or at least that's what he's telling me. It turns out though, that I'm competition for him because he makes knitted hemp washcloths by machine.
    Visit my Etsy shop at www.etsy.com/shop/TheCrochetFarm

    If we aren't showing love, His love, then what are we doing calling ourselves Christians?

    Psalm 73: 25 Whom have I in heaven but you?
    And earth has nothing I desire besides you.
    26 My flesh and my heart may fail, but God is the strength of my heart
    and my portion forever.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Deena in GA View Post
    I finally got a small order of hemp in, so am working on orders of hemp soap bags. Hemp has become extremely hard to find, and it's my best online seller by far. And I just found out that the guy I usually get it from is trying to sell his business. This small order I got was from someone else, but it turns out that he actually bought it from my usual guy and I got the last of what this one had - or at least that's what he's telling me. It turns out though, that I'm competition for him because he makes knitted hemp washcloths by machine.
    Odd. Why would it be harder? I thought Canada was growing the textile variety, and sounds like a hardy crop. Maybe buckram linen would make a suitable substitute? Some of the historic dress fabric suppliers might still have some hemp stock (Burley and Townbridge spell? - I always get that name wrong, or Jas Townsend come to mind). Dharma lists a few 100% hemp products.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deena in GA View Post
    I finally got a small order of hemp in, so am working on orders of hemp soap bags. Hemp has become extremely hard to find, and it's my best online seller by far. And I just found out that the guy I usually get it from is trying to sell his business. This small order I got was from someone else, but it turns out that he actually bought it from my usual guy and I got the last of what this one had - or at least that's what he's telling me. It turns out though, that I'm competition for him because he makes knitted hemp washcloths by machine.
    Have you checked with Dharma Trading Company? Hemp yarn? Henry's Attic.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  17. #17
    The embellished hexie:

    I got this idea from a video (will try to find for a link) of a lady who embroidered some crewel style flowers onto large linen hexies, and machine sewed them together with a method that resembles drawn thread work. Her results were quite pretty. I simply appliqued a basic six petaled flower onto to mine. Result was wonky, and "primative"...charitably speaking. Well, practice. I'm using that hexie anyway, because it does have a bit of charm. Took all afternoon for that one patch, and I should have used a proper quilting fabric with a tighter weave (but I liked the color). Despite the extra time involved, they are fun, and I'll be embellishing more. I might need to learn the basics of crewel embroidery, too.
    Last edited by Faroe; 08-16-2019 at 07:41 PM.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Faroe View Post
    The embellished hexie:

    I got this idea from a video (will try to find for a link) of a lady who embroidered some crewel style flowers onto large linen hexies, and machine sewed them together with a method that resembles drawn thread work. Her results were quite pretty. I simply appliqued a basic six petaled flower onto to mine. Result was wonky, and "primative"...charitably speaking. Well, practice. I'm using that hexie anyway, because it does have a bit of charm. Took all afternoon for that one patch, and I should have used a proper quilting fabric with a tighter weave (but I liked the color). Despite the extra time involved, they are fun, and I'll be embellishing more. I might need to learn the basics of crewel embroidery, too.
    I have a friend who is participating in a hexie crazy quilt challenge for 2020, the hexies are nine inches and are incredible in their construction and stitching techniques. She even includes bead and silk ribbon embroidery along with her own hand tatted lace along with vintage and antique lace, trims, metal threads, etc!
    Last edited by packyderms_wife; 08-17-2019 at 12:58 PM.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  19. #19
    Sounds enchanting. Hexies seem to lend themselves to out-of-the-box ideas.

    https://www.mybluprint.com/article/d...n-3-easy-steps

    I am including this link for anyone who might want to try the starch assisted applique, but doesn't want the fragrances in the commercial laundry starches (I can't find any that aren't perfumed, and fake scents make me heave - what is "fresh cotton scent," anyway??). I found both back basting by itself, and thread basting around a template to be cumbersome for these tiny pieces, at least at my skill level. I went back to stick glue around the template, but now can't get the paper out. Good applique results, but I'll have to finish the embellishment, steam press to release the glue, and cut the hexie from the back to remove the papers. I found many applique YouTubers who were getting good results with starch, which makes the piece stiff enough to sew in accurately w/o the paper.

    Made up a small batch of DIY laundry starch this morning, per the link's recipe. I haven't tried that yet, but will later today, when there is time.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Faroe View Post
    Sounds enchanting. Hexies seem to lend themselves to out-of-the-box ideas.

    https://www.mybluprint.com/article/d...n-3-easy-steps

    I am including this link for anyone who might want to try the starch assisted applique, but doesn't want the fragrances in the commercial laundry starches (I can't find any that aren't perfumed, and fake scents make me heave - what is "fresh cotton scent," anyway??). I found both back basting by itself, and thread basting around a template to be cumbersome for these tiny pieces, at least at my skill level. I went back to stick glue around the template, but now can't get the paper out. Good applique results, but I'll have to finish the embellishment, steam press to release the glue, and cut the hexie from the back to remove the papers. I found many applique YouTubers who were getting good results with starch, which makes the piece stiff enough to sew in accurately w/o the paper.

    Made up a small batch of DIY laundry starch this morning, per the link's recipe. I haven't tried that yet, but will later today, when there is time.

    Thank you for the link, I can't stand scents/perfumes it causes me to have migraines.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  21. #21
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    saw this little clip on machine sewing of hexies. I thought it might be of interest. https://www.facebook.com/LoveSewinga...0618300226805/
    "During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." George Orwell

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by marsh View Post
    saw this little clip on machine sewing of hexies. I thought it might be of interest. https://www.facebook.com/LoveSewinga...0618300226805/
    Thank you for the link! Wonders if my sewing machine has that stitch now! Hmmm
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  23. #23
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    The first travel bag for my teaching daughter for school is finished. The parts of the second bag for my grand daughter are finished. I just need to sew the seams around and bind.
    Attached Images
    "During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." George Orwell

  24. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by marsh View Post
    The first travel bag for my teaching daughter for school is finished. The parts of the second bag for my grand daughter are finished. I just need to sew the seams around and bind.
    That is a great looking bag!

    I am back from the convention - I got to the projects of many knitters who would show them to me as they saw me knitting the hats.

    The first red that I cast off rather than sewing together because Nightwolf needed something red to display his working penannular on (the Celtic/Norse Pins that have a moving pin in the center that goes through the cloth).

    It makes such a good display piece I'm not sure it will ever be a real hit, I got a second one nearly finished but was so busy the last two days of the convention I didn't finish it.

    Nightwolfs Jewelry and books sold really well so we are all happy - oh and there was a lady with a Ph.D. in Medieval textiles that was selling the most amazing stuff - I got some rare breed sheep's wool, a hand-turned wooden spindle shaft and a clay spindle whorl (Nightwolf will me a soapstone one when he has time, meanwhile I have a cheap but period looking one on there.)

    Oh and I got some hemp for spinning from her, she also had tons of linen squares, help squares, real gold embroidery thread, a reproduction needle from an archeological find, all sorts of cool things - I wish I could have bought almost all of them but I only got a few bits and bobs as they say here.

    Now that I'm home I'm hoping to finally finish getting the floor loom stuff all into the room upstairs from the old outdoor weaving room and get at least a small project on it as well as finish a number of knitting UFO (Unfinished Objects).
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by marsh View Post
    The first travel bag for my teaching daughter for school is finished. The parts of the second bag for my granddaughter are finished. I just need to sew the seams around and bind.
    Did you use a pattern to make that bag?
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  26. #26
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    https://www.byannie.com/patterns/purses-and-bags?page=4

    Annie Unrein: she has dozens of bag patterns and you can buy hardware kits, soft and stable "batting" and mesh for inside pockets. She even has how to videos on some. Mine was the ultimate travel bag. I bought a kit on Bluprint/Craftsy and it had a step by step video. I used my own fabric for this one. My grand daughter's is made with their kit fabric. I also have a messenger bag I will be making in smaller scale complimentary fabric to the travel bag next month.
    "During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." George Orwell

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