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Misc August 6th Poolside Chat
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  1. #1
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    August 6th Poolside Chat

    Yikes where did July go? Time to start thinking about knitting socks for this winter.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  2. #2
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    Not much stitching going on here this week, we're in the throes of canning green beans, chicken, and then chicken broth. Aside from that I'm currently down with kidney stones, I forgot how painful those could be.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  3. #3
    Goodness, I hope you feel better soon! We were up till 1 in the morning canning veg/tomato juice, but it'll be good this winter. Almost panicked at the thought yesterday when the tomatoes had cooked down, at not having enough jars. My hub would say that is impossible, given that I can't pass up jars at yard sales, on sale at hardware, etc. But most of my jar collection is quarts. So a rummage through the maze that's the back porch discovered 16 pints, the pricey square squat jars that Ball came out with, but they stack well on a shelf next to each other, as opposed to the round jars. So all was well.
    Hoping to card some of the Shetland from one of my ewes to blend with alpaca and our mohair for a custom handspun order, most people have no idea what it takes just to prepare fiber for spinning. But I enjoy the process so it's all fine.
    All the discussion of quilting is inspiring, I hope you all will post pictures

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by rosepath View Post
    Goodness, I hope you feel better soon! We were up till 1 in the morning canning veg/tomato juice, but it'll be good this winter. Almost panicked at the thought yesterday when the tomatoes had cooked down, at not having enough jars. My hub would say that is impossible, given that I can't pass up jars at yard sales, on sale at hardware, etc. But most of my jar collection is quarts. So a rummage through the maze that's the back porch discovered 16 pints, the pricey square squat jars that Ball came out with, but they stack well on a shelf next to each other, as opposed to the round jars. So all was well.
    Hoping to card some of the Shetland from one of my ewes to blend with alpaca and our mohair for a custom handspun order, most people have no idea what it takes just to prepare fiber for spinning. But I enjoy the process so it's all fine.
    All the discussion of quilting is inspiring, I hope you all will post pictures
    I'd love to see your fibers!
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  5. #5
    Knitting and stitching have been the only things keeping me sane the last couple of days. Skating on the far and brittle edge of stability. Ended up stripping the peach tree of a tub's worth of fruit, and slamming it all, one by one, into the side of the chicken house. (I've always pitched like a girl - maybe I was never just never before angry enough. It was a better option than tearing off every one of the gates.) The goats ran for cover, but came out for feeding on the ambrosia after the barrage was over.

    Anyway, more or less back to normalcy. Will pick up the knitting again after I get over this suffocating hot flash.

  6. #6
    I discovered that one over in the stitch along covered too much fabric. None of the even weave fabric I have was big enough for the design, so I needed to get a larger piece. Heaven and Earth Design is having a birthday, and I got a larger piece of fabric on sale, plus some 28 James needles. Now I have to wait for my goodies to get here.

    I almost have the first page of Teresa Wentzler's Peacock Tapestry done, and it is looking very nice. She frequently uses blended colors, but this design is almost all blended colors. This makes it a challenge correcting mistakes. Not that I EVER make a mistake in counting.

    Jacki
    McKenziefatwood.com
    JackiGossSpecial-Tees.com

  7. #7
    I made some progress on the "Dead Easy Hat" then ran out of the yarn I was using - it is somewhere up in the room in progress upstairs - I hope to try and dig some out, I'd rather in the matching grey (my husband wears hats all Winter) but if not I can use blue or natural to finish the top, then I hope to photograph it and write down the "pattern" or basic idea anyway and post it.

    We are on the verge of needing to start canning here, but the tomatoes started under lights this Winter are just now starting to fruit and the later ones are in flower.

    My husband ended up with something like 50 tomato plants of various kinds, thankfully I have a lot of recipes for tomato sauce/crushed tomatoes.
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Melodi View Post
    I made some progress on the "Dead Easy Hat" then ran out of the yarn I was using - it is somewhere up in the room in progress upstairs - I hope to try and dig some out, I'd rather in the matching grey (my husband wears hats all Winter) but if not I can use blue or natural to finish the top, then I hope to photograph it and write down the "pattern" or basic idea anyway and post it.

    We are on the verge of needing to start canning here, but the tomatoes started under lights this Winter are just now starting to fruit and the later ones are in flower.

    My husband ended up with something like 50 tomato plants of various kinds, thankfully I have a lot of recipes for tomato sauce/crushed tomatoes.
    I’m looking forward to trying your hat pattern.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  9. #9
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    This is my first completed panel from Natalia Bonner's youtube ruler work class. It is on whole cloth, basted in squares for stability, quilted on a domestic Brother PQ 1500. (Heavy quilting pulls the fabric in which causes the rippled effect.) It will be saved as a reference design sampler in my sewing room.
    Attached Images
    "During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." George Orwell

  10. #10
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    Marsh loosen the tension to reduce the ripple effect.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  11. #11
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    Thanks, I'll try that. Some ripple is expected because of the density differential (according to Amy Johnson of Amy Quilts.) I might also pull out the basting in the sashing. I put it there for stability and in case I wanted to cut it into blocks for storage.

    My stitches are also very close together as I am learning and have not yet gotten the hang of manipulating the ruler, sewing along side it while moving the quilt under the needle. (Still have ye old iron grip on the ruler and tension in the shoulders.) I hope to improve by the 365th block - lol.
    "During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." George Orwell

  12. #12
    Packy the short version (which I'm sure you can figure out) is cast on any multiple of four stitches that is right for your gauge - the pattern is very expandable so exact isn't a worry - I used 96 stitches on my Aran weight hat, if it is a bit too big I would go further down the next time.

    Now you knit flat or round k2p2 for as long as you like 5 to 12 inches, then decrease by doing

    K2 tog, p 2

    K1 P2 (for at least one round or several if you like a longer decrease)

    K1 P 2 tog

    K1 P1 for at least one row as above

    Now, K2 together every other round/line or even every round if you want a sharp decrease.

    Stop when you have 6 to 12 stitches on the needles and bind off or run a thread through the round version.

    For the flat version bind off and then sew up the back and then sew the top

    You can do this in any size from baby hats to a mans extra-large or even larger if you want to felt the wool or make an upside down bag and run a drawstring through it.

    I will repeat this on another thread with the photos when I get it done - I found the grey wool this morning so hopefully, I will finish it today.

    There are versions of this "pattern" all over the net and it was one of the only things my Mom used to knit - she wore the hats on her morning walks.

    Hope that helps
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by marsh View Post
    This is my first completed panel from Natalia Bonner's youtube ruler work class. It is on whole cloth, basted in squares for stability, quilted on a domestic Brother PQ 1500. (Heavy quilting pulls the fabric in which causes the rippled effect.) It will be saved as a reference design sampler in my sewing room.
    Looks good. The sun angle emphasizes the patterns nicely. I don't think a finished piece would have the same ripples along the margin, as that would be finished with quilting too.

  14. #14
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    We're having rain here so I'm giving myself a day off of outside work! This means I can get back to sewing - first I need to do the boring but necessary clothing repairs and take in some pants and shirts, then I can pick up that beautiful hat I'm knitting. I should just go ahead and cast on another because I know I'll want to give at least one of them for Christmas. Tonight I'm piecing out a large backing for that giant quilt top. Turns out I'm heading to Florida for a few months, so will take it with me to have it quilted there; I'll bind it and finally wrap it for Christmas.

    Marsh, I love how that turned out for you! I'm still practicing free-motion on my Janome. I'm okay with geometrics; it's the loops and curves that challenge me!

    Melodi, thanks for the tutorial! I'll have to put it in my notebook
    All that is gold does not glitter....

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by marsh View Post
    Thanks, I'll try that. Some ripple is expected because of the density differential (according to Amy Johnson of Amy Quilts.) I might also pull out the basting in the sashing. I put it there for stability and in case I wanted to cut it into blocks for storage.

    My stitches are also very close together as I am learning and have not yet gotten the hang of manipulating the ruler, sewing along side it while moving the quilt under the needle. (Still have ye old iron grip on the ruler and tension in the shoulders.) I hope to improve by the 365th block - lol.
    I stitch extremely densely on my work and have no rippling. Yes, holding onto the piece tightly can also cause rippling problems as your hands will get tired over time and the tension your putting on the quilt lessens.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaSue View Post
    I'm still practicing free-motion on my Janome.
    Which Janome do you have? I have a 6500, 5124 (for the free arm) and a Gold Gem for traveling.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  17. #17
    Please see the revised instructions on the other thread I started, I took notes and it is actually K2 P 2 tog for the first row of the decrease.
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by packyderms_wife View Post
    Which Janome do you have? I have a 6500, 5124 (for the free arm) and a Gold Gem for traveling.
    My dear sons went together and bought me the Memory Craft 6600 Professional. It's a dream and I love it. For travel and free arm, I also have a Brother CS6000i (that I got for $100 and it does a very good job of quilting with the included walking foot).

    Best machine I have ever sewn on is my step-mom's Cadillac -- her Bernina, which is at least 35 years old so no computer stuff. But wow a lovely machine to use! She's made hundreds of just gorgeous quilts on it.

    I plan to pick up a Janome treadle (I have an 1876 Wheeler & Wilson treadle that works too, but would like something better quality). Fun to have to keep working on projects when no power.
    All that is gold does not glitter....

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaSue View Post
    My dear sons went together and bought me the Memory Craft 6600 Professional. It's a dream and I love it. For travel and free arm, I also have a Brother CS6000i (that I got for $100 and it does a very good job of quilting with the included walking foot).

    Best machine I have ever sewn on is my step-mom's Cadillac -- her Bernina, which is at least 35 years old so no computer stuff. But wow a lovely machine to use! She's made hundreds of just gorgeous quilts on it.

    I plan to pick up a Janome treadle (I have an 1876 Wheeler & Wilson treadle that works too, but would like something better quality). Fun to have to keep working on projects when no power.
    I'm looking to upgrade to the 6700 or 6800 if it's out already, the harp is even larger than the 6500. I agree on the Bernina!
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  20. #20

    Crumb quilting

    I ran into this yesterday, and tried out a bit today. Never been a fan of crazy quilts, but found a few examples of sashed tiny piece crumb quilt blocks that were rather pretty. The ones I like best kept most of the colors in a tight group.

    I'm out of hexies, and would rather reserve the rest of my blue fabric, so the small scraps work well right now for hand sewed strips. I used very tiny stitches and a lot of back stitches since these strips will be slashed along the edges to even them. Will cut and piece those once there are enough for a 10" square block.

    Plan is to topstitch the outlines of the shapes onto a backing of muslin for better durability, and then, sandwich onto batting and back, with minimal stitch-in-the-ditch quilting. Quite slow so far to make, but there isn't any fussing about it. The process so far, has been enjoyable.

  21. #21
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    Here is a close up of the ruler work. I really do think I have the top thread tension too tight.It is why I haven't been able to get crisp turns. There is also a pic of my long swirl practice sandwich. Gradually getting the hang of it. I gave up on my complex drawing pad and bought a lower tech "Blackboard" Liquid crystal paper. It is greenish in pen tone and not very bright but it serves the purpose of drawing for muscle memory and is erasable and supposedly archivable. I will give the other one to my grandson for Christmas.
    Attached Images
    "During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." George Orwell

  22. #22
    Pretty swirls. Love the pebbling. Yes, lotta practice. I would be STRESSED! AT least with hand work, a do-over is easy.

  23. #23
    Crumb piecing stresses me out. I can't make it look good; I need more structure.

    Found some applique videos, and some back-basting applique videos. The back basting method didn't make any sense to me (infact, I thought it was a stupid method), but once I got the fabric together for one petal, and drew a flower on the topside of my fabric panel, it seemed easier than all the freezer paper, template, ironing, finger pressing, stick glue, starching, etc. that the other methods go through. I like DIRECT. I needed a light table (for getting the drawing onto the back side of the fabric), which I don't have, and all the windows have too much furniture in front of them. Fortunately, I have PLENTY of well lit planted vivs to choose from, and the boa didn't seem to mind. Also, I keep the viv glass cleaner than the I do the windows (much cleaner). I used a short stubby quilting needle for the back "basting"...the stitches are actually very small, and a thin millner's needle for the applique.

    Anyway, the Jordan Fabrics couple could have completed a full quilt in the same amount of time, but I got one petal appliqued, and it looks lovely, even if that's bragging.

    I'm sick of working with the fabric I have on hand (the sale shipment isn't due until the 5th) Fortunately, the thrift store had a couple of shirts in good cotton and nice small print (one was a good dull red), so I have more fabric for two dollars expense.

  24. #24
    The Connecting Threads order finally came in. I bought all sale pieces in 1/4 yard lengths. Turns out, cotton quilting fabric that typically sells for 10 or 11 dollars per yard is significantly nicer than WallMart fabric in the $3.99 range. Who knew? I was working today with some JoAnne's stuff that I'd throw in with with the WM pile. Just not that nice, which is probably why I have generally preferred the softer fabrics gleaned from old shirts.

    Can't wait to get the new fabric washed and pressed so I can cut into and start stitching some.

    Turns out I am good at applique (Thank you, Becky Goldsmith videos for technical assistance), but I don't tend to like other people's motifs, and drawing my own stresses me out. Can't face a blank block. I can draw one or two flowers, and stitch them well, but can't manage to draft a pictoral grouping. So, back to squares. I like the precision measurement and marking that is required in hand piecing nine-patch, the perfect corner matches, and getting it RIGHT. That to me, is relaxing. I really don't have the skill to draw pretty arrangements.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Faroe View Post
    The Connecting Threads order finally came in. I bought all sale pieces in 1/4 yard lengths. Turns out, cotton quilting fabric that typically sells for 10 or 11 dollars per yard is significantly nicer than WallMart fabric in the $3.99 range. Who knew?
    I've known this for the better part of three decades now, just gotta shop the sales and closeouts to make it affordable. I still have some fabric I bought from WM in the 80's and it's nice stuff, some of it came from VIP Mills and another very popular mill that were still in CONUS back in the day. Sadly almost all of them have either shuttered their doors or have moved overseas.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  26. #26
    The Connecting Threads order finally came in. I bought all sale pieces in 1/4 yard lengths. Turns out, cotton quilting fabric that typically sells for 10 or 11 dollars per yard is significantly nicer than WallMart fabric in the $3.99 range. Who knew? I was working today with some JoAnne's stuff that I'd throw in with with the WM pile.
    Amazing difference, isn't it? When I discovered Connecting Threads, their own fabrics (which was all they sold at the time... it's only been the last couple yesrs they started carrying other designers lines) were selling for $3.94 and $4.94 a yard. Their batiks were $6.94! Thankfully, I had sone extra cash at that time, and I was able to build a huge stash, buying on their sales and clearance. It was actually their qualiyy fabrics which got me back into quilting again... I'd gotten so disgusted with WalMart and even JoAnns quality (and JoAnns prices are absurd, especially for the quality) that I was only doing an occasional project for a shower gift or the like.

    If you like to stash a lot of smaller pieces, I highly recommend these storage bags sold by Nancy's Notions: https://www.nancysnotions.com/fat-qu...ags-set-6.html

    They do sell them individually, but are apparently temporarily out of stock.

    You can fit larger pieces in these bags... I have some with 1 and even 2 yard lengths. I love them.. the clear plastic window lets you see the contents without having to open it, but they zip shut and seal so dust, pet hair, etc is never a problem. I prewash and iron each piece, and then store them in either coordinating collections, or in groups of colors... it's really nice, say, when I want to use blues for a project to be able to grab 2-3 of the "suitcases" and take them to my worktable to sort through, rather than having to dig through multiple Rubbermaid containers or stacks in a cabinet to find what I want.

    As far as fabric quality... after using the CT and other quality fabrics (the Hoffman 1894 Batiks are printed on fabric so fine it feels more like silk than cotton), I was in WalMart one day and happened to notice they had some fat quarter collections of batiks. A couple color combinations caught my eye, and the prices were reasonable, so i bought them.

    OMG... I got it home, and couldn't believe the difference. The fabric was a cheap, coarse muslin, and the batik printing looked like it had been done by drunk kindergarteners... wax drips and spills! Never again... I donated them to an elderly Amish lady who supplements her income by making quilted potholders. And I vowed to never buy cheap fabric again!

    Oh... there is another site which has quality, name brand quilt cottons at quite reasonable prices... www.thousandsofbolts.com He advertises as "we have thousands of bolts, but only one nut" (the owner, apparently!)

    Summerthyme

  27. #27
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    I buy my fabrics from this place as they are the only ones that consistently carry the black Michael Miller Courture Cotton fabrics that I use for the backs of all of my work.


    https://www.missouriquiltco.com/shop...xoCyM8QAvD_BwE

    It's the Missouri Star Quilt Company

    https://www.missouriquiltco.com/


    The first link was to the daily deals.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  28. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by packyderms_wife View Post
    I buy my fabrics from this place as they are the only ones that consistently carry the black Michael Miller Courture Cotton fabrics that I use for the backs of all of my work.


    https://www.missouriquiltco.com/shop...xoCyM8QAvD_BwE

    It's the Missouri Star Quilt Company

    https://www.missouriquiltco.com/

    The first link was to the daily deals.
    I placed an order with them this afternoon. After completion, I went right back in and filled up another cart. Those selections will have to wait until at least September.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Faroe View Post
    I placed an order with them this afternoon. After completion, I went right back in and filled up another cart. Those selections will have to wait until at least September.
    Yep the temptation is real!
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  30. #30
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    If you want to try solids, Kona has a great selection of colors. They are good quality with a nice hand and sometimes on sale. I cruise the online sales at equilter.com, Handcocks of Paducah, and Keepsake Quilting. Bluprint also has their own line, some of which can be of good medium quality.

    You want cotton broadcloth. I only buy backing at Joanns on sale. I suppose I shouldn't, but 5-6 yards of the good stuff is expensive. You could also try your local quilt shop. They are all over.

    Sometimes you can find coloring books that have line drawings for applique. You just "add a scant quarter." You can also find old Baltimore Album style applique patterns, which are interesting. https://www.pinterest.com/cgarrisonm...-album-quilts/ Sometimes you can take them into a Kinkos and enlarge them to the size you want.

    There are also the Hawaiian quilts: https://pacificrimquilt.com/gallery/...ock%20Patterns
    "During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." George Orwell

  31. #31

    templates

    I like squares, but they are a pain to measure out. I have old quilting grids with thick lines, numbers and branding that obscures the measure lines, and the 6X6 is bit worn around the corners, Because I hand sew, I can't just rotary cut a stack at a time in strips. What matters most is accurate stitching lines. Was looking at acrylic templates, but they didn't look promising. everything had a seam allowance included (which I understand, as tracing around is less accurate), but they all seemed to have big holes to connect the stitching lines. If I have to guess where to center the mechanical pencil lead, that isn't accurate either. So, I got out the graph paper, and made some from paper with holes for the stitching points pierced with a needle that the pencil lead just fits through. The graph paper is marked in 5ths of an inch, not 4ths, and it is inaccurate itself, loosing a scant 1/16th of an inch over the course of 3 inches, both directions. Grrr..... One would think a graph paper mfr. could get that right. I made it work anyway, and checked against the Omnigrid, but will be getting REAL graph paper (and not the Dollar Store stuff ETA-it's in millimeters, eta - no, it's not quite, and not precisely the same up and down as it is sideways, either.), when I can find some.

    So, I now have an accurate 1" template, and an accurate 3" template, and the squares are quick and easy to mark and cut. AND....I didn't have to spend any money.
    Last edited by Faroe; 08-03-2019 at 09:40 AM.

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