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Harvest Great Way To Deal With Lots Of Tomatoes
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    W. Georgia
    Posts
    7,086

    Great Way To Deal With Lots Of Tomatoes

    The garden has really produced this year and the tomatoes are abundant and beautiful. I'm trying not to allow any of them to go to waste or rot. Besides giving many away I have found the best way to do that is to freeze them.

    Wash them load them up in plastic grocery sacks and put them in the freezer.

    When it is time to can them take the bag out of the freezer and put them in the refrigerator overnight. (I put them in a big glass bowl) This way in the morning they are partially defrosted and so easy to handle.

    The skins slip off easily and you can core them and cut them up how ever you want without the mess of tomato juice all over the place. No boiling water and plunges into ice water either. Cuts the work time in half.

    Right now I have the latest batch of half frozen tomatoes on the counter in a covered bowl defrosting. Later on I'm going to turn them into tomato sauce and can them.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    SE Georgia
    Posts
    4,996
    Quote Originally Posted by Rabbit View Post
    The garden has really produced this year and the tomatoes are abundant and beautiful. I'm trying not to allow any of them to go to waste or rot. Besides giving many away I have found the best way to do that is to freeze them.

    Wash them load them up in plastic grocery sacks and put them in the freezer.

    When it is time to can them take the bag out of the freezer and put them in the refrigerator overnight. (I put them in a big glass bowl) This way in the morning they are partially defrosted and so easy to handle.

    The skins slip off easily and you can core them and cut them up how ever you want without the mess of tomato juice all over the place. No boiling water and plunges into ice water either. Cuts the work time in half.

    Right now I have the latest batch of half frozen tomatoes on the counter in a covered bowl defrosting. Later on I'm going to turn them into tomato sauce and can them.
    Sounds good.

    We grow ours for fresh eating. For bulk, we buy #10 cans of sauce and diced. That is what seems to work for us.

  3. #3
    The thing I really love about "pre-freezing" tomatoes is how much water you can dump off as they thaw! I save many hours of boiling down sauces, catsup, etc by getting rid of the water that releases from the cells as they freeze. And it IS water... colorless and nearly flavorless.

    It gives me a thick, rich spaghetti sauce or puree that tastes "garden fresh"... very different from the sauce that results from cooking it for 6-8 hours to get it thick enough. And the k8tchen stays much cooler!

    Summerthyme

  4. #4
    How To Make Basic Tomato Sauce with Fresh Tomatoes
    by Emma Christensen






    Video on link
    : https://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-mak...-kitchn-193622

    If you’ve been eyeing those gorgeous tomatoes at the farmers market and wondering what it might take to transform them into jars of delicious red sauce, wonder no more. Here is everything you need to know to make a moderate-sized batch of tomato sauce for your pantry (or freezer!), from picking the right tomatoes to packing the sauce into jars.

    Fifteen pounds of fresh tomatoes. One afternoon. Eight pints of sauce. It’s go time.
    Watch: Homemade Tomato Sauce
    Fresh Tomato Sauce from Scratch

    Making tomato sauce isn’t very hard, but it’s definitely labor-intensive. Even the relatively small amount that we’re making here — just enough for a few special mid-winter meals — will take you a solid afternoon of work from start to finish. If you want to make a larger batch, give yourself even more time for the project and think about recruiting some extra hands to help you out.

    If you’ve never made tomato sauce from fresh tomatoes before, this is a good place to start. The amount isn’t overwhelming, but you’ll make enough to justify the afternoon. It’s also a small enough amount that you can freeze the whole batch if you don’t feel like canning it.

    Bottom line: Grab yourself some tomatoes and make yourself some tomato sauce this weekend. You won’t regret it.
    How To Make Basic Tomato Sauce with Fresh Tomatoes
    (placeholder)
    (Image credit: Emma Christensen)
    Choosing Tomatoes for Sauce: Big Boys Are Best

    Any tomato that tastes good to you can be used to make tomato sauce; it’s really that simple. Romas and other paste tomatoes are often recommended for canning because they generally have more flesh with less juice and fewer seeds. However, they are smaller (which means more up-front prep work), and I often find that their flavor isn’t as good as other tomatoes. I used Big Boy tomatoes — your basic summer slicing tomato — for the batch I made for this post and couldn’t be happier. If you like what you start with, you’ll like what you finish with.

    Another factor to consider is the cost of the tomatoes. Anything more than a dollar a pound, and the cost-effectiveness of this home canning project starts to plummet. A friend of mine who tries to can around 180 pounds of tomatoes each summer says she doesn’t pay much attention to the particular tomato variety; she just picks up what she can find for cheap. This often means buying in bulk directly from farms or picking your own — or, even better, growing your own if you can!
    Key Steps for Tomato Sauce

    Set up assembly line processing. Prepping the tomatoes for the sauce is the most time-consuming part of this afternoon project, but if you get yourself organized before you begin, the work will move quickly. Set yourself up with all the tomatoes bottoms-up on the sheet pan, bring a large pot of water to a boil, and then set an ice bath and compost bowl nearby for peeling.
    Chunky or puréed sauce? To save ourselves a bit of work, I recommend chopping the tomatoes in a food processor or blender before cooking them. A few pulses will make a chunky sauce, and longer processing will make a very smooth sauce. Conversely, if you like a very chunky sauce, skip this step altogether and let the tomatoes break down naturally as they simmer. You can also chop the tomatoes by hand, run them through a food mill, or purée them with a stick blender after they’ve been cooking.
    How long to cook the sauce? I give a cooking range of 30 minutes to 90 minutes (1 1/2 hours). Shorter cooking times will yield a thinner sauce with a fresher tomato flavor; longer cooking times will thicken your sauce and give it a cooked flavor. Watch your sauce as it simmers and stop cooking when it reaches a consistency and flavor you like.

    How To Make Basic Tomato Sauce with Fresh Tomatoes
    (placeholder)
    (Image credit: Emma Christensen)
    Storing and Serving Fresh Tomato Sauce

    Let the sauce cool, then transfer it into freezer containers or freezer bags. Sauce can be kept frozen for at least three months before starting to develop freezer burn or off-flavors.

    If you’re feeling particularly industrious you can also hot-water can the tomato sauce by moving the hot sauce to sterilized canning jars, sealing tightly with new lids, and boiling for 30 minutes. Want to read more about hot-water canning? Here’s our quick guide.
    Product image
    Amazon
    Ball Wide Mouth Mason Jars
    $17.85

    This sauce is the most basic tomato sauce there is — just tomatoes and some lemon juice to bump up the acidity to safe levels for canning. You can add seasonings like garlic, onions, or herbs, but I like the fact that this is a neutral base for whatever recipe I want to make, from weeknight pizzas to a fancy lasagna. Just avoid using oil if you’re planning to can your sauce, as this can potentially be a source for botulism.


    https://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-mak...-kitchn-193622

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    W. Central GA
    Posts
    3,345
    I am take my tomatoes, wash them then cut them into wedges and put on a cookie sheet with onions, garlic, salt, pepper and italian seasoning, drizzle with olive oil and roast at 450 for about an hour. Then i run them through the Vitorio mill which get out all seeds and skin. That makes some fine tomato sauce, soup or whatever you want to use it for.
    Sherry in GA

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    S.E. Texas U.S.A.
    Posts
    2,559
    40 years ago, when my Brother was growing tomatoes commercially in his greenhouse range, he often had lots of good, ripe tomatoes left over at the end of the season. These were actually the best tasting part of his crop. There was an elderly woman family friend, who lived down the road. She would can up a lot of these tomatoes and make sauce. She passed away a few years ago when she was in her 90's. Before she died, she asked my Brother if he wanted the last two cases of his tomato sauce she still had. These were over 30 years old at the time. She had kept the pint jars in her pantry all that time, which was climate controlled. My Brother said sure, and brought them home. He opened the first one, which looked fine. He said it smelled good and fresh. He cooked up a meal with it, and said it tasted as good as the ones from 30 year earlier.

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