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POL Meet AOC’s Brain: Saikat Chakrabarti
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  1. #1
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    2 Meet AOC’s Brain: Saikat Chakrabarti

    https://spectator.org/meet-aocs-brai...t-chakrabarti/

    Meet AOC’s Brain: Saikat Chakrabarti

    Annoyed at AOC? He’s the one to blame.

    David Catron
    July 15, 2019, 12:08 AM

    Nancy Pelosi is obviously having difficulty controlling the increasingly acrimonious infighting between factions of the House Democratic caucus. Most observers assume that the primary cause of this discord is Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and the cadre of far-left first-termers collectively known as “the Squad.” But its actual source is Saikat Chakrabarti, the prime mover behind a Tennessee-based PAC called the “Justice Democrats,” whose support was largely responsible for getting Reps. Ocasio-Cortez, Ilhan Omar, Rashida Tlaib, Ayanna Pressley, Ro Khanna, and Pramila Jayapal elected last November. Chakrabarti has now set up shop in the House, ostensibly as AOC’s chief of staff.

    Chakrabarti’s previous HQ was a Knoxville address out of which the Justice Democrats and another PAC operated side by side with a dozen congressional campaign committees. This arrangement flouted a variety of campaign finance laws and prompted several Federal Election Commission complaints, including one alleging that Chakrabarti set up a $1 million slush fund. But this sort of skullduggery is standard practice among Democrats. What exacerbated the already tense atmosphere in their House caucus was Chakrabarti’s response to the $4.6 billion border aid package passed by Congress last month. On June 27, he took to Twitter and berated the Democratic leadership for its shortcomings:
    As usual, Dem leadership tried to create a pre-watered down border bill because of a mistaken idea that it’s more “viable.” And they lost to McConnell anyway. This is the entire theory of change that never works. Why not start from your strongest negotiating stance?
    Predictably, this presumptuous tweet drew a number of angry responses from various Democrats who had voted for the measure, whereupon Chakrabarti once again betook himself to Twitter and proceeded to accuse his critics of racism:
    Instead of “fiscally conservative but socially liberal,” let’s call the New Democrats and Blue Dog Caucus the “New Southern Democrats.” They certainly seem hell bent to do to black and brown people today what the old Southern Democrats did in the 40s.
    Chakrabarti later deleted that tweet, but not before it had clearly signaled who actually calls the shots in AOC’s office. There isn’t the slightest possibility that a 33-year-old staffer in the office of a first-term U.S. congresswoman would even consider publicly criticizing the Democratic colleagues of his putative boss — much less the leadership of her caucus — if he feared any serious consequences. Can you imagine what would happen to a staffer in GOP Rep. Dan Crenshaw’s office who had posted a tweet insulting the freshman congressman’s Republican colleagues? The staffer would be lucky to escape with his life, much less his job. The best he could hope for would be the cardboard box treatment.

    But that’s not what happened to Chakrabarti. He not only remained on the job, but he was also encouraged by AOC in a series of typically incoherent tweets. A week after the above-quoted tweets Chakrabarti took to Twitter yet again and openly admonished Nancy Pelosi — who was first elected to Congress when he was still in diapers and also happens to be the Speaker of the House — for her eminently sensible reluctance to pursue a politically suicidal impeachment inquiry into President Trump’s fictitious crimes. In another tweet posted the same day, he ridicules Pelosi’s legislative acumen and compares her supposed deficiencies to the “strategic smarts” of the weird sisters of the Squad:
    All these articles want to claim what a legislative mastermind Pelosi is, but I’m seeing way more strategic smarts from freshman members like @AOC, @IlhanMN, @RashidaTlai and @AyannaPressley. Pelosi is just mad that she got outmaneuvered (again) by Republicans.
    Pelosi exhibited considerable forbearance with AOC and the rest of the Squad for the first few months after they joined Congress. She had to put out a few fires for them, of course, including several conflagrations related to their propensity to trade in anti-Semitic slurs. But the attacks on the Democratic caucus, not to mention Pelosi personally, by a staffer exhausted the speaker’s patience. She singled out Chakrabarti in a closed-door meeting last week and told him, “Do not tweet about our members and expect us to think that that is just OK.” Meanwhile, after he suggested that votes cast by Rep. Sharice Davids (D-Kan.) “enable a racist system,” the House Democratic Caucus went after him on Twitter:
    Who is this guy and why is he explicitly singling out a Native American woman of color? Her name is Congresswoman Davids, not Sharice. She is a phenomenal new member who flipped a red seat blue. Keep Her Name Out Of Your Mouth.
    But wait, there’s more: Chakrabarti’s Justice Democrats PAC is also taking fire from the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC). The Hill reports, “Congressional Black Caucus members are furious at Justice Democrats, accusing the outside progressive group … of trying to oust lawmakers of color, specifically African American lawmakers.” The PAC evidently plans to primary at least six CBC members who occupy safe Democratic seats simply because they don’t lean far enough to the left. Chakrabarti is clearly using his position as AOC’s chief of staff to engineer a hostile takeover of the Democratic Party. He said as much during an extensive profile for The Washington Post Magazine:
    To me, there wasn’t a difference between working for her and working for the movement … The whole theory of change for the current Democratic Party is that to win this country we need to tack to the hypothetical middle … you don’t take unnecessary risks, which translates to: You don’t really do anything.
    Chakrabarti doesn’t see himself as a mere staffer in some congresswoman’s office. He sees AOC as someone who provides him with a headquarters from which he can “fundamentally change” the Democratic Party. As the magazine’s profile phrases it, “Saikat Chakrabarti isn’t just running her office. He’s guiding a movement.” What does Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez think about all this? It isn’t her job to think. That’s Chakrabarti’s function. Her job is to provide him with a platform to carry out his grandiose political schemes. Whenever you hear AOC say something outrageous, remember that Saikat Chakrabarti is behind the curtain, furiously pushing buttons, spinning dials, and pumping the smoke machine.
    Bad politicians are sent to Washington by good people who don't vote. - William E. Simon

  2. #2
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    Here's the group behind these loonie representatives




    eta: Here's their youtube channel

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5K...ZXypuiw/videos

  3. #3
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    Thanks for posting that link, BH.
    Bad politicians are sent to Washington by good people who don't vote. - William E. Simon

  4. #4
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    Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Chief of Staff Admits: Green New Deal About Socialism, Not Climate

    Saikat Chakrabarti, the chief of staff and former campaign mastermind for Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY), reportedly admitted that the “Green New Deal” was not originally about climate change, but changing the economy...

    http://www.timebomb2000.com/vb/showt...at+Chakrabarti
    Proud Infidel...............and Cracker

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  5. #5
    Glad to make his acquaintance.Up to now i didn't think she had one.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by BH View Post
    Here's the group behind these loonie representatives




    eta: Here's their youtube channel

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5K...ZXypuiw/videos
    Every time I see a picture of her all I can think is: "Does Shrek know Donkey has gone rouge?"
    "The entire human race are neither my brothers nor kin. There is nothing noble about non-discrimination - concepts such as love, trust and brotherhood lose all meaning when discrimination is removed."

  7. #7
    perhaps time to revise and update some folks "lists"

    just sort of thinking out loud, no firm opinion at this point.
    Dosadi

    III


    My family & clan are my country.

  8. #8
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    OK, we have a name now . . but WHO IS HE? Where did he come from? Who trained and is backing HIM?
    The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing at the right time, but also to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

    Worrying does not take away tomorrow's troubles, it takes away today's peace .

  9. #9
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    I don't know anything about him. But here is a link to what I found.

    https://www.walikali.com/saikat-chakrabarti/

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saikat_Chakrabarti

    Michael

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seeker View Post
    OK, we have a name now . . but WHO IS HE? Where did he come from? Who trained and is backing HIM?
    This^^^
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  11. #11
    BUMP. BTTP. Much useful info here.
    Don't be dismayed by goodbyes. A farewell is necessary before you can meet again. And meeting again, after moments or lifetimes, is certain for those who are friends. --Richard Bach

  12. #12
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    Well people have been saying for quite some time that AOC doesn't have the brain for what she is part of. Now we know the first gear in the string mechanism holding her up. Follow the money and string and we'll find the next gear. However I suspect there are several levels until you get to the wizard behind the curtain.
    Find my free fiction stories here.

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  13. #13
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    https://www.politico.com/interactive...t-chakrabarti/

    Two years ago, after working for the Bernie Sanders presidential campaign, Saikat Chakrabarti co-founded an organization called Brand New Congress with a lofty goal: Launch hundreds of progressive candidates into congressional races.

    Hundreds didn’t exactly pan out. But one major star emerged from that process: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who shocked the political world this summer with a primary upset over rising party leader Joe Crowley (N.Y.).

    Now Ocasio-Cortez is headed to Congress, with Chakrabarti as chief of staff.

    Though they’ve been in Washington for only a few weeks, they’re already making a splash — clashing with incoming committee chairmen, joining a protest in Nancy Pelosi’s office and agitating for newly empowered Democrats to stake out ambitious goals on climate change. Chakrabarti turned heads by saying on a call, “We gotta primary folks.”

    It’s all part of a broader strategy to deploy inside-out organizing, Chakrabarti said. Staying connected to the progressive movement — and the public eye — through attention-grabbing demonstrations and social media is part of gaining policy leverage.

    In other words: Don’t expect them to back down.

    “When you shoot for big stuff, you stay true to the movement, you fight unapologetically on the inside, that is a very, very powerful way to pass the radical solutions that are necessary to face the radical problems that you have,” he said.
    Chakrabarti isn’t naive about the prospect of passing major liberal legislation with a Republican Senate and Donald Trump in the White House. And he wants to seek bipartisan achievements, citing the Senate effort to end support for the Yemen war as an example.

    But he also has his eye on the long game, name-checking everything from the abolitionist movement to the country’s economic mobilization during World War II.
    He has big policy dreams, like a “Green New Deal,” which would tackle everything from mitigating climate change to transforming the American economy, and criminal justice reform. He wants to lay the groundwork now to make them realities.

    “Another thing to really do over the next two years is to basically show the American people what will be possible if the Democrats win the House, the Senate and the presidency in 2020, and that means putting our best foot forward,” Chakrabarti said. “It means putting the most ambitious, the boldest, the biggest things we can, and then just build a movement around that.”

    That approach doesn’t surprise Alexandra Rojas, executive director of Justice Democrats, the successor to Brand New Congress. She first met Chakrabarti on the Sanders campaign, where they regularly pulled 15-hour days.

    “We’re in a very do-or-die moment, and I think he embodies the integrity of fighting for a better world,” she said. “He’s a progressive force.”

    Though Chakrabarti is shifting from outside activist to inside player, he’s no stranger to career transitions. The 32-year-old Fort Worth native came to the Sanders campaign after growing disillusioned with the tech world. He co-founded Mockingbird, a web design tool, and then built up the product team at the payment processor Stripe. That followed a brief stint on Wall Street right out of Harvard.

    Those earlier moves were propelled by a collegiate desire to start his own company, and the belief that technology was his generation’s way to change the world. Now he has his sights set squarely on the halls of power.

    “You have to decide to create the society you want to create,” he said, “and that’s done through politics.” — Eli Okun
    Find my free fiction stories here.

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  14. #14
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    Some historical facts on the man though you can tell this is a foreign website and the authors are ESL … English is not their first language.

    https://www.dreshare.com/saikat-chakrabarti/

    The man has a net worth of between 700K and 800K as of 2018.

    His parents came to the states for "professional reasons."
    Find my free fiction stories here.

    "Isn’t it interesting that the same people who laugh at science fiction listen to weather forecasts and economists?” - Kelvin R. Throop III

  15. #15
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    Saikat Chakrabarti: The techie behind Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

    Saikat Chakrabarti: The techie behind Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

    https://www.indiaabroad.com/indian-a...98a2205ce.html

    Saikat Chakrabarti, chief of staff to newly-elected New York Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has been named among Politico’s “Power List,” of people to watch in 2019. The list, Politico says, “highlights politicians, activists and operatives across the country who are positioned to play a critical role in the political landscape leading up to 2020.”

    The Fort Worth Texas native and a Harvard graduate spent nearly eight years in Silicon Valley before shifting gears. Post Harvard, after a brief stint on Wall Street, Chakrabarti, a Bangladeshi-American, went to California, where he co-founded Mockingbird, a web design tool, and then built up the product team at the payment processor Stripe.

    But in 2015, he left the tech space and went to work for Bernie Sanders. After graduation, Chakrabarti wanted to start his own company, Politico says, but he was slowing getting disillusioned by the industry. “You have to decide to create the society you want to create,” he told Politico, “and that’s done through politics.”
    On his decision to join Sanders’ campaign, Chakrabarti told Rolling Stone that while he wasn’t “entirely sure he [Sanders] had all the right solutions,” he knew “he was talking about the right problems.” It was at Sander’s campaign that Chakrabarti met Alexandra Rojas and Corbin Trent. All three ended up on the campaign’s “Distributed Organizing Team.” Chakrabarti told Rolling Stone that the team’s responsibilities included “harnessing any and all of the volunteer energy that existed beyond the early primary states.” They traveled around the country canvassing and leading phone-banks.

    After Sander’s campaign, Chakrabarti, along with Rojas and Trent, cofounded the progressive political action committee Justice Democrats, and served as its executive director. Justice Democrats joined hands with Brand New Congress, also cofounded by Chakrabarti. Together, they aimed to recruit 400 candidates by asking people to nominate individuals from their own communities. According DC Beat, “party affiliation didn’t matter; candidates had to want health care for all, a living wage, and to want money not to rule all in politics.” They ended up with 12,000 applications, out of which 12 ran for primaries, and one won a seat in Congress: Ocasio-Cortez.

    Chakrabarti told Rolling Stone that caring too much about a win ratio is part of the reason he believes the Democratic Party would never have recruited Ocasio-Cortez. “We’re OK losing 90 percent of our races, if it means that the ones we win cause the kind of shift in thinking about what’s possible — like Alexandria’s race honestly did,” Chakrabarti told the magazine. “So that’s a different way of measuring success.”
    He has big policy dreams, like a “Green New Deal,” which, Politico says would tackle everything from mitigating climate change to transforming the American economy, and criminal justice reform. He wants to lay the groundwork now to make them realities. “Another thing to really do over the next two years is to basically show the American people what will be possible if the Democrats win the House, the Senate and the presidency in 2020, and that means putting our best foot forward,” Chakrabarti told Politico.“It means putting the most ambitious, the boldest, the biggest things we can, and then just build a movement around that.”
    Find my free fiction stories here.

    "Isn’t it interesting that the same people who laugh at science fiction listen to weather forecasts and economists?” - Kelvin R. Throop III

  16. #16
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    There have been several threads on Chakrabarti here on TB already -
    The wonder of our time isn’t how angry we are at politics and politicians; it’s how little we’ve done about it. - Fran Porretto
    -http://bastionofliberty.blogspot.com/2016/10/a-wholly-rational-hatred.html

  17. #17
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    How he became AOCs chief of staff

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.faa952eb2338

    On a Wednesday morning in late May, emissaries of two of the strongest political voices on climate change convened at a coffee shop a few blocks from the U.S. Capitol. Saikat Chakrabarti, chief of staff to Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.), was there to meet Sam Ricketts, climate director for Washington Gov. Jay Inslee (D), who is running for president almost exclusively on a platform of combating global warming. A newly released plank of Inslee’s climate change agenda had caught the attention of Chakrabarti and his boss, who had tweeted that Inslee’s “climate plan is the most serious + comprehensive one to address our crisis in the 2020 field.” Pleased by the positive reception from the demanding Green New Deal wing of the climate struggle, Ricketts had set up this meeting with Chakrabarti to establish a personal connection and share approaches to climate advocacy.
    “Congrats on the rollout,” Chakrabarti told him as they sat down. “That was pretty great.”

    “Thank you again for the kudos you guys offered,” said Ricketts. “We wanted to be pace-setting for the field, and I think we’re there now. … I want to ask you for input … in addition to hearing what you guys are working on.”

    Chakrabarti had an unexpected disclosure. “The interesting thing about the Green New Deal,” he said, “is it wasn’t originally a climate thing at all.” Ricketts greeted this startling notion with an attentive poker face. “Do you guys think of it as a climate thing?” Chakrabarti continued. “Because we really think of it as a how-do-you-change-the-entire-economy thing.”

    “Yeah,” said Ricketts. Then he said: “No.” Then he said: “I think it’s, it’s, it’s, it’s dual. It is both rising to the challenge that is existential around climate and it is building an economy that contains more prosperity. More sustainability in that prosperity — and more broadly shared prosperity, equitability and justice throughout.”

    Chakrabarti liked the answer. “The thing I think you guys are doing that’s so incredible is … you guys are actually figuring out how to do it and make it work, the comprehensive plan where it all fits together,” he said. “I’d love to get into a situation where everyone’s trying to just outdo each other.” But Chakrabarti couldn’t help adding: “I’ll be honest, my view is I still think you guys aren’t going big enough.”

    Ricketts seemed unfazed by the critique. “Well, you know, we’re not done. When it comes to a nationwide economic mobilization, there’s more to come on this front, for one. And other key components we’re going to be rolling forward speak to some of the key justice elements of this … ensuring every community’s got a part of this.”

    Nationwide economic mobilization. Justice. Community. Ricketts kept laying down chords in Chakrabarti’s key. It was an acknowledgment of just how far inside establishment Washington the progressive movement has reached. Everything is intersectional now — including decarbonization.

    Ocasio-Cortez’s priorities and approach offer the purest expression of the progressive movement in Congress. And as her gatekeeper and chief of staff — the COS to AOC — Chakrabarti is a new type on Capitol Hill: the movement chief of staff. It’s what you become when your boss is invested with the hopes of millions of Twitter followers and painted with the prejudices of countless haters. Your job involves both scheduling for the next week and planning for the ages.

    “I like to show my cards and see people’s reactions,” Chakrabarti told me after we left Ricketts. “I just wanted to get a sense of where they’re coming from. … They seem open and hungry and want to do stuff. … In my mind, an ideal situation is we have a president surrounded by a bunch of people who are constantly thinking how could we go bigger, bolder, faster, better on everything. … I don’t know if Inslee’s going to be president, but if he runs a really good campaign, maybe he ends up running a big agency. What’s the mind-set he’s going to bring to that agency?” Coffee with Ricketts was a way of peering over the political horizon — which is exactly what a movement chief of staff wants to do.

    Almost as remarkable as the rise of Ocasio-Cortez has been Chakra*barti’s trajectory. When we met, Chakrabarti, 33, arrived with his customary backpack and white button-down shirt stretched over a torso that has spent a lot of time in a gym. Because I was interested, he began telling the story of how he went from politically disengaged techie to fired-up activist to insurgent insider. He didn’t mention that he also deserves much of the credit for recruiting AOC to run in first place.

    “To me, there wasn’t a difference between working for her and working for the movement as a whole,” he said. “The whole theory of change for the current Democratic Party is that to win this country we need to tack to the hypothetical middle. What I think that means is, you don’t take unnecessary risks, which translates to: You don’t really do anything. Whereas we’ve got a completely different theory of change, which is: You do the biggest, most badass thing you possibly can — and that’s going to excite people, and then they’re going to go vote. Because the reality is, our problem isn’t that more people are voting Republican than Democrat — our problem is most people who would vote Democrat aren’t voting.”

    The son of immigrants from India, Chakrabarti grew up in Fort Worth. He graduated from Harvard with a computer science degree and went to work on the tech side of a hedge fund in Connecticut. After saving enough money to start his own company, he moved to San Francisco in 2009 and co-founded Mockingbird, a Web design tool. In 2011 he became one of the earliest employees of Stripe, the online payments platform. Chakrabarti and Ross Boucher, one of his colleagues on the Stripe product team, would work 70-hour weeks, eat dinner every night in the office, then go work out. “He’s someone who actually cares about the thing being done and not whatever credit he might get,” Boucher told me. “He’s interested in the outcome, and doing the work.”

    At first Chakrabarti shared the idealism of those lured to the Bay Area to change the world through tech. But San Francisco was a shock. “You see, like, holy crap, is this the dystopian future we’re signing up for?” he says. “I mean, it’s just huge amounts of wealth and some very rich people, and then just poverty and homelessness very visually and very viscerally. That was a lot of why I ended up quitting Stripe. I loved the people I worked with — I just didn’t feel like I was actually solving any real problems. And I wanted to figure out how to do that. And you know, yes, climate change is an existential threat, but there’s also kind of this existential issue of why is it that as our society is progressing … things seem to be regressing and getting worse for a large number of people? Why is that happening? How do we fix that?”

    Initially, he doubted the answer lay in political engagement — a learned cynicism, he thinks, of his generation having grown up watching wars, recession and bank bailouts. “We’ve only ever seen the establishment win,” he says. What changed his mind was the enthusiastic mass reaction to Bernie Sanders’s campaign four years ago. He contacted Zack Exley, a senior Sanders adviser, and said he’d do anything to help. Exley was in charge of the campaign’s distributed organizing team, which was trying to use the Internet to harness the tremendous volunteer energy. “He saw how our organizing worked, and he was able to imagine the [software] tools that we needed and just build them himself,” Exley told me. “He was just a super-humble, super-level-headed guy. I always used to joke that he was the only emotionally healthy person in politics.”

    In the spring of 2016 — even before Sanders conceded the primary race — Chakrabarti, Exley and other Sanders organizers, including Alexandra Rojas and Corbin Trent, were thinking of next steps for the movement. To enact change, they reasoned, it was vital to transform Congress. They formed a group called Brand New Congress with the mission to recruit hundreds of community leaders and working-class candidates to run on a vision of getting corporate money out of politics, tackling climate change, transforming the economy, providing health care for all, standing for racial justice and stemming mass incarceration. They sifted through more than 10,000 nominations to find the best recruits. “Our biggest criteria was, basically, find someone who had a chance to sell out and didn’t,” Chakrabarti says.

    Ocasio-Cortez, who was then a bartender from the Bronx, was nominated by her brother. It was Isra Allison, another member of Brand New Congress, not Chakrabarti, who had a key initial recruiting interview with her. But Chakrabarti drove the overall effort. In the recent Netflix documentary “Knock Down the House,” which follows four of the candidates, Chakrabarti can be seen declaring to a gathering of the recruits, including Ocasio-Cortez, “We actually want to create that grass-roots-funded machine that can be a real opposition to the current institutional powers.” Nasim Thompson, who also helped recruit candidates, told me: “It was clear from the very beginning that the ship was moving with his guidance. … He was so focused that it naturally created a gravitational pull. … He was sort of relentless in that, and simultaneously just so pleasant, it was shocking. Almost not human. I used to say, ‘How do you stay so Zen?’ ”

    In the end, the project “was a spectacular failure,” Chakrabarti tells me, laughing. They managed to recruit only a dozen candidates because, as it turned out, many good people doing strong community work didn’t see the point of running for Congress. Of the 12, only one won: Ocasio-Cortez. Chakrabarti ended up helping to manage Ocasio-Cortez’s campaign, while Trent handled media and Rojas worked on field operations. Under the auspices of a new group, Justice Democrats, also co-founded by Chakrabarti, they endorsed dozens more, including progressive winners such as Reps. Ilhan Omar (Minn.), Ayanna Pressley (Mass.) and Rashida Tlaib (Mich.).

    “It was a total failure, but we also had no idea that one or two victories would have as much of an earth-shattering impact like AOC’s victory did,” Chakrabarti says. “It was a learning experience to find out that Alexandria, but also Ilhan, Rashida and Ayanna, just by being strong leaders within Congress and continuing to act the way they did during the campaign, to a large extent, can actually move stuff so fast and so massively and so big. … One of my favorite things Alexandria said recently was: We’re not just changing the Democratic agenda, we’re changing the Republican agenda. Because now there’s Republicans putting out climate plans.”

    Trent has joined Chakrabarti inside Ocasio-Cortez’s office, as communications director, while Rojas and Thompson remain on the outside, as executive director and candidate recruitment director, respectively, of Justice Democrats. The movement now has an inside game, as well as an outside game. “That’s what building power looks like,” Thompson says.

    Afirst and accountable to social movements the entire time I’ve been running for office.” The office Chakrabarti manages in the Cannon Building operates in that spirit. “We think of ourselves as an office that’s … a component to a larger infrastructure,” he says. “Literally, our mission statement in the office talks about what do we, as a movement, want to do in the long run, and that’s how we set our goals.” A draft of the mission statement brainstormed at a staff retreat begins: “To boldly and decisively spur a people-led movement for social, racial, environmental and economic justice.”

    Not everything has run smoothly. Chakrabarti played a major role in helping to produce the Green New Deal resolution introduced by Ocasio-Cortez and Sen. Edward J. Markey (D-Mass.) in February. Yet the measure’s rollout was marred by an FAQ that included controversial language not in the resolution, such as providing economic security to those “unwilling to work.” Conservative critics gleefully pounced. “An early draft of a FAQ that was clearly unfinished and that doesn’t represent the GND resolution got published to the website by mistake,” Chakrabarti wrote on Twitter. “Mistakes happen when doing time launches like this coordinating multiple groups and collaborators.”

    In March, meanwhile, a conservative group filed a complaint with the Federal Election Commission highlighting more than $1 million paid by Brand New Congress and Justice Democrats to a corporation set up by Chakrabarti. Chakrabarti and an attorney for the groups said none of the money went to Chakrabarti but was to support the multiple campaigns seeking to transform Congress.

    On a typical day in late May, Chakrabarti’s schedule is split between conventional management chores and tending to the movement. In a room with the rest of the staff, he sat at a desk that he has not had time to decorate with photos or anything personal. On his computer, Chakrabarti showed me the automated system he programmed to process the overwhelming volume of requests for Ocasio-Cortez’s time. Work in the office paused occasionally to watch Ocasio-Cortez on television questioning witnesses at a hearing on facial recognition technology.

    After meeting with Ricketts and attending a briefing on caste prejudice in America, Chakrabarti was visited by a class of political communications students from Syracuse University. They quizzed him on the office’s social media strategy. “If this was a newsroom, she’s our editor in chief,” he said. “We’re constantly trying to find interesting frames we can take to connect issues that don’t usually get connected.” He added: “It’s not just a media strategy, but the office strategy boils down to: Where do we actually want to see the world move to and the country move to … and how do we get from here to there?”

    Chakrabarti is a student of America’s past economic mobilizations in the face of crisis, such as Franklin Roosevelt’s original New Deal during the Great Depression, and the industrial retooling necessary to build the material to win World War II. In my conversations with him and in the conversations I watched him have with others, he often circled back to one of his core convictions, which is that voters really will turn out for bold ideas scaled big enough to tackle today’s crises of climate and inequality. What he needed — what the movement needed — was more data to convince skeptics, especially centrist Democrats.

    Later that afternoon, he walked to a park near the Capitol for a pair of conference calls with pollsters. As Hill worker bees in blazers and blouses bustled past, he sat on a bench and kicked around a calculus of change with those on the calls. “The basic argument of the progressive wing versus the centrist wing of the Democratic Party right now is the centrists think the way to win is tack to the middle, try to convince Republicans,” he said on the first call. “Progressives think the way to win is mobilizing and convince people to vote for something. So how do you actually test that hypothesis before the actual election?”

    The idea under discussion would be to go into swing districts held by centrist Democrats and survey views on progressive proposals, such as Medicare-for-all, pieces of the Green New Deal, caps on credit card interest rates. It would be a rigorous analysis, with the ideas matched against counterarguments and also tested for their potential to motivate people to vote. The results would be shown to reluctant representatives, to get them onboard. “Part of it is about pressuring these congresspeople and presidential candidates to go big, but also giving them the cover to do so,” Chakrabarti said to me between calls with the pollsters. “How do we help people develop a bit more of a backbone?”

    It seemed to me that Chakrabarti’s worldview is founded on his utter certainty not just that the progressive vision is good for America — but that it is what most Americans actually want. Yet what if he is wrong?

    After the calls, I asked him what happens if the polling shows the centrists are correct — that these ideas are too much, too fast, for most folks. “I don’t want it to be false propaganda,” he said. “So if it turns out that our hypothesis is wrong, that just means we need a different strategy. … If the answer is no, then I think the strategy would be: Okay, how do we reach the people in their district in a different way to present the ideas and try to persuade people that these are good ideas.” He paused for a long moment and then added drolly: “And, you know, if after everything, it turns out we’re just totally wrong, then hopefully I’ve been convinced of the error of my ways.”
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  18. #18
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    Top matter from the article in the post above … (dates matter too)

    AOC’s Chief of Change
    Saikat Chakrabarti isn’t just running her office. He’s guiding a movement.

    Saikat Chakrabarti, Ocasio-Cortez’s chief of staff, in the Cannon House Office Building in Washington in June.

    Story by David Montgomery Photos by Mary F. Calvert
    July 10, 2019
    The wonder of our time isn’t how angry we are at politics and politicians; it’s how little we’ve done about it. - Fran Porretto
    -http://bastionofliberty.blogspot.com/2016/10/a-wholly-rational-hatred.html

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kathy in FL View Post
    Well people have been saying for quite some time that AOC doesn't have the brain for what she is part of. Now we know the first gear in the string mechanism holding her up. Follow the money and string and we'll find the next gear. However I suspect there are several levels until you get to the wizard behind the curtain.
    that would be Soros, who is hell bent on destroying the US.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  20. #20

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by packyderms_wife View Post
    that would be Soros, who is hell bent on destroying the US.
    which SHOULD BE hell bent on destroying HIM . . . instead of playing with itself over in the corner
    "Have I not commanded you? Be strong and of good courage; do not be afraid, nor be dismayed, for the Lord your God is with you wherever you go." Joshua 1:9 (NKJV)

    III

    Raging Deplorable - we do NOT forget; we do NOT forgive; we are LEGION

  22. #22
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    here ya go . . .
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    "Have I not commanded you? Be strong and of good courage; do not be afraid, nor be dismayed, for the Lord your God is with you wherever you go." Joshua 1:9 (NKJV)

    III

    Raging Deplorable - we do NOT forget; we do NOT forgive; we are LEGION

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by packyderms_wife View Post
    that would be Soros, who is hell bent on destroying the US.
    It is a good suspicion to have.
    Find my free fiction stories here.

    "Isn’t it interesting that the same people who laugh at science fiction listen to weather forecasts and economists?” - Kelvin R. Throop III

  24. #24
    may they all meet nasty ends asap
    Sapphire

    myopically challenged

  25. #25
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    His days are numbered.
    vienna 1683.

    Turn your swords into plowshares ,and you'll be plowing for those that didn't...

    We didn't create GOD out of our imagination ,He created us out of his.

  26. #26
    They all need to be deported.


    AOC Chief of Staff Wears T-Shirt Supporting Nazi Collaborator

    Saikat Chakrabarti has come under fire for wearing a Subhas Chandra Bose t-shirt




    Nic Rowan - July 9, 2019 10:55 AM


    Saikat Chakrabarti, chief of staff to Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D., N.Y.), has come under fire for wearing a t-shirt that depicts the Nazi collaborator Subhas Chandra Bose.

    When Ocasio-Cortez won her race after a long-shot primary battle in 2018, Chakrabarti wore the the t-shirt in "Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez's Chief of Staff on Acting Fast in Congress," a NowThis News video featuring his role in the freshman Congresswoman's campaign.


    Since I’ve only lost eight followers for pointing out who the Justice Democrats are, I thought, "**** it." pic.twitter.com/CkN2FuRXrv

    — Jason Haddix (@doctor_eon) July 8, 2019

    Bose was an Indian dissident who, in 1935, met with Italian dictator Benito Mussolini and gave him a copy of his book, The Indian Struggle, which advocated for fascism as a political model.

    Bose met with Hitler in 1942, later praising Hitler's rule in 1944, saying that India's government "should be a synthesis between National Socialism and Communism." According to the Times of India, Bose "fancied himself as a world leader like Hitler and Mussolini."

    Ocasio-Cortez has also recently come under fire for positively quoting Eva Perón, the former first lady of Argentina, and Nazi sympathizer. Under Perón's husband's rule, former Nazis such as Holocaust architect Adolf Eichmann and Nazi eugenicist Josef Mengele were granted sanctuary in Argentina.

    "I know that, like every woman of the people, I have more strength than I appear to have," Ocasio-Cortez tweeted, soon adding, "I had watched for many years and seen how a few rich families held much of Argentina's wealth and power in their hands. So the government brought in an eight hour working day, sickness pay and fair wages to give poor workers a fair go."


    "I had watched for many years and seen how a few rich families held much of Argentina's wealth and power in their hands. So the government brought in an eight hour working day, sickness pay and fair wages to give poor workers a fair go."

    – Evita Perón

    — Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (@AOC) July 7, 2019


    Chakrabarti called moderate Democrats "New Southern Democrats" in a now-deleted tweet in late June.

    "Instead of ‘fiscally conservative but socially liberal' let's call the New Democrats and Blue Dog Caucus the ‘New Southern Democrats,'" Chakrabarti said. "They certainly seem hell bent to do to black and brown people today what the old southern Democrats did in the 40s."

    After Chakrabarti deleted his tweet, he doubled down on his point in more tweets.

    "Didn't realize this needed to be said, but: you can be someone who does not personally harbor ill will towards a race, but through your actions still enable a racist system," he wrote. "And a lot of New Democrats and Blue Dogs did that today."

    "This is in reference to my comparing Blue Dogs and New Democrats to 1940s Southern Democrats," he continued. "Southern Democrats enabled a racist system too. I have no idea how personally racist they all were. And we're seeing the same dynamic play out now."


    This is in reference to my comparing Blue Dogs and New Democrats to 1940s Southern Democrats. Southern Democrats enabled a racist system too. I have no idea how personally racist they all were. And we're seeing the same dynamic play out now.

    — Saikat Chakrabarti (@saikatc) June 27, 2019
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    Psalm 94:1 O Lord, the God of vengeance, O God of vengeance, let your glorious justice shine forth! 2 Arise, O Judge of the earth. Give the proud what they deserve. 3 How long, O Lord? How long will the wicked be allowed to gloat?

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