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WEATHER Mississippi River Flooding (Southern Version)
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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by mawmaw View Post
    Most of South Louisiana is below sea level. You think Katrina's flooding was bad this will wipe out everything south of Baton rouge !!
    A bit of New Orleans is below sea level...that's it.

    Please think before posting...if most of South LA was below sea level, it would be under water already.

  2. #42
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    And they try to tell us PBS is a waste of money.

    If ANYONE in DC actually watched this, --- well first it'd be a miracle--- they MIGHT understand what is coming.



    Not to mention that these guys are on PUBLIC record saying it's GONNA happen.
    RULE 1:
    THEY want you DEAD.

    "If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my brothers' children (and their parents) may have peace, and have NO KNOWLEDGE of what I have done."

    The BEST in Life:
    To CRUSH your enemies.
    To see them driven before you
    To listen to the lamentations of their women

  3. #43
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    So many of us really don't have a clue. I am on the east coast, not affected... yet.. and our news is not covering this as much as it should... I was in the flooding area in April. Saw street flooding in Morgan City due to severe thunderstorms. Saw pretty high water levels then. I can't IMAGINE what it is like now. Scary and sad.

  4. #44
    I guess that means no crawfish for a couple of years or really expensive.

  5. #45
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    or oil refined...

    or shipping up or down the MS...
    RULE 1:
    THEY want you DEAD.

    "If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my brothers' children (and their parents) may have peace, and have NO KNOWLEDGE of what I have done."

    The BEST in Life:
    To CRUSH your enemies.
    To see them driven before you
    To listen to the lamentations of their women

  6. #46
    https://www.theadvocate.com/baton_ro...87e65c825.html

    Morganza Spillway opening delayed until later next week; here's why

    BY EMMA KENNEDY | EKENNEDY@THEADVOCATE.COM MAY 30, 2019 - 3:55 PM

    The much-anticipated opening of the Morganza Spillway has been postponed as authorities juggle changing forecasts, a river elevation threatening to overtop the structure, and a hesitance to put any more water in the Atchafalaya floodway than is necessary.

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers on Thursday announced the Morganza Spillway's gates north of Baton Rouge on the Mississippi River will not begin opening Sunday as expected, but will be pushed back to June 6.

    Army Corps spokesman Ricky Boyett said the decision was made due to a change in forecasts that show the swollen Mississippi River won't reach an elevation that threatens overtopping the Morganza structure until at least June 9, compared to the prior model showing a June 5 threat.


    He said officials will continue monitoring the changing forecasts, but pushing the opening back allows a few more days without diverted water in area croplands, homes and waterways.

    "We don't want to put any more water into that floodway than we need to," he said.

    The initial plan was to open one bay each day for the first three days starting Sunday, and to release a relatively small amount of water at a time, allowing wildlife to safely escape the deluge. Officials have previously said they expect to open between 20 and 25 bays of the spillway's 125.

    Officials, homeowners, farmers and business owners in the spillway's path have for days been moving to higher ground in anticipation of the Sunday opening. Public meetings were held in Butte La Rose and Morgan City earlier this week to allay concerns of residents largely worried about backwater flooding threatening their homes.


    Morgan City told barge sinking means 'worst is behind them' even before Morganza opens
    The Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority's contractors this week began placing a barge at Bayou Chene — near Morgan City — to drastically reduce the backwater flooding in St. Mary, St. Martin, Iberville, Terrebonne and Assumption parishes that residents said has crippled them in the past.

    Already-high water in the spillway's path has spelled a 100% loss in shrimping season, flooded soybean, corn and sugarcane fields, and the possibility of a shortened crawfish season.

    Gov. John Bel Edwards toured the barge late Thursday to witness the sinking process, which involves floating the Bayou Chene barge into place then submerging it and closing off the flowing water with sheet metal, steel beams and rocks.

    The entire barge-sinking process should be complete within days, but now that the spillway's opening has been pushed back, the sunken barge should allow for backwater flooding already in place in those communities to lower before the new June 6 opening date.


    During a brief press conference during the barge tour, Edwards said the plan is still to open one spillway bay per day from June 6-8, then on June 9 open as many as it takes to get the water flow to 150,000 cubic feet per second.

    Updated estimates show that the water around Morgan City should by June 21 rise to 10 feet from the current 8.5 feet, almost two weeks after authorities anticipate the spillway's bays will be completely opened.

    The June 6 opening would mark only the third time the Morganza Spillway has opened, the previous being in 2011 and 1973.
    "...Awake thou that sleepest, and arise from the dead, and Christ shall give thee light. See then that ye walk circumspectly, not as fools, but as wise, Redeeming the time, because the days are evil." - Ephesians 5:14-17

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by BenIan View Post
    https://www.theadvocate.com/baton_ro...87e65c825.html

    The June 6 opening would mark only the third time the Morganza Spillway has opened, the previous being in 2011 and 1973.
    First opening of gates (1973)

    On April 17, 1973, in order to lower the water level of the Mississippi River and relieve pressure on the Old River Control Structure, the Corps of Engineers opened 42 of the 125 steel gates of the Morganza Spillway for the first time since its completion, allowing about half of its maximum designed flowrate to pass from the Mississippi into the Atchafalaya Basin. The spillway received minor scouring and slight damage to the stilling basin, and substantial flooding occurred in the Atchafalaya Basin. After the 1973 flood, the structure was restored to its original condition.[1][3][24][25]

    Second opening of gates (2011)
    Main article: 2011 Mississippi River floods
    Flooding Scenarios[35]
    Anticipated inundation from Scenario 1
    Anticipated inundation from Scenario 1a
    Anticipated inundation from Scenario 2
    Anticipated inundation from Scenario 3

    The 2011 Mississippi River floods began to become serious in April. In response, the Corps first analyzed the flooding, and then opened the spillway in a controlled manner. The Corps studied four flooding scenarios, all of which assumed the Bonnet Carré Spillway would be concurrently operating at full capacity (100%).

    Scenario 1: Open the Morganza Spillway to half (50%) of its maximum capacity, which would divert 300,000 cubic feet per second (8,500 m3/s) of water.
    Scenario 1a: Open the Morganza Spillway to one-quarter (25%) of its maximum capacity, which would divert 150,000 cubic feet per second (4,200 m3/s) of water.
    Scenario 2: Do not open the Morganza Spillway, and keep the Old River Control Structure (ORCS) at its routine operating level of only 30% of the Mississippi's flow; no additional water would be diverted
    Scenario 3: Do not open the Morganza Spillway, and open the ORCS somewhat more, which would divert an extra 150,000 cubic feet per second (4,200 m3/s) of water.

    Following this analysis, which showed that extensive flooding was expected in the Atchafalaya Basin regardless of the choice made regarding the Morganza Spillway, the Corps decided to start the 2011 diversion by opening the spillway a bit less than described in scenario 1a (21%, not 25%)[36]

    The Governor of Louisiana, Bobby Jindal, had meanwhile sent a letter on May 4, 2011, to Robert Gates, the United States Secretary of Defense, requesting that the National Guard be deployed under Title 32 of the United States Code status to respond to record water levels in Louisiana, where there was "a significant probability that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [would] open the Morganza Spillway for the first time since 1973."[37]

    The second opening of the Morganza Spillway began with the lifting of a single floodgate on May 14, 2011. Diversion of 125,000 cubic feet per second (3,500 m3/s) of water from the Mississippi River to the Atchafalaya Basin was planned during this event, with the structure operating at about 21% of its capacity. This diversion was deemed necessary to protect levees and prevent major flooding in Baton Rouge and New Orleans, with the tradeoff of creating possibly severe flooding in the Atchafalaya Basin.[1][38]

    By May 18, 2011, a total of 17 gates (the largest number for the 2011 event) had been opened by the Corps of Engineers. The Corps estimated the flow rate at 114,000 cu ft/s (3,200 m3/s). However, on May 25, new estimates from the U.S. Geologic Survey (USGS) described a much higher rate of 172,000 cu ft/s (4,900 m3/s), resulting in the closure of 3 bays by May 26, and additional closures by May 29, bringing the total to 11 bays with an estimated diversion rate of 120,000 cu ft/s (3,400 m3/s).[39][40] The Corps continued to evaluate the flow and close additional bays as appropriate. By June 6, the number of open gates had been reduced to seven,[41] and by June 8, only two gates were still open.[40] All bays were closed on July 7, 2011.

    The Corps had estimated that it would take opening one-fourth of the spillway’s 125 bays — or 31 bays — to control the flow of the river through Baton Rouge in response to a forecast crest of 45 feet (14 m) anticipated on Tuesday, May 17, 2011, which must remain below 1,500,000 cu ft/s (42,000 m3/s) of water per second through Baton Rouge to ensure the integrity of the levee system.[42] Since Morganza never operated above 172,000 cu ft/s (4,900 m3/s), the flooding in the Atchafalaya Basin was considerably lower than had been anticipated during the initial estimates of 300,000 cu ft/s (8,500 m3/s).[39] By May 29, the Corps had also opened 330 of the 350 bays of the Bonnet Carré Spillway located near New Orleans.[40]

    Third Opening of Gates (2019)

    On Wednesday May 22, 2019 the U.S. Army Corps Of Engineers announced due to the extended flood event on the Mississippi river which has been above flood stage since January 2019 that they are anticipating the third opening of the Morganza Spillway due to another anticipated rise and fears that the Mississippi River waters would overtop the spillway and if that were to happen it would destroy the structure. The possible opening could happen as early as June 2, 2019. On Monday May 27, 2019 the Army Corp of engineers officially announced it will open Morganza on Sunday, June 2, 2019.[43]

    The US Army Corps of Engineers New Orleans issued a Press Release on May 30, 2019 announcing the postponement of the opening of the Morganza Spillway until June 6, 2019.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morganza_Spillway
    People create their own questions because they are afraid to look straight. All you have to do is look straight and see the road, and when you see it, don't sit looking at it - walk. Ayn Rand

  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by tech View Post
    A bit of New Orleans is below sea level...that's it.

    Please think before posting...if most of South LA was below sea level, it would be under water already.
    Tell that to the bayou country getting ready to be flooded out !!!! From New Orleans DOWN to the coast IS below sea level.
    I've got my duck taped now what???
    God Bless
    MawMaw

  9. #49
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    9.5 inches of rain for the month here in central Iowa with more rain coming this afternoon.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  10. #50
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    So glad to see a reference to this Southern Version thread from the Midwest flood thread.

    They need to open those Morganza floodgates, sooner!!!

    A friend and I drove up the levee today (illegally, which is why I didn't get out for a pic) and sure enough, it's STILL much higher than it should be with just the Bonne Carre floodgates open. You can see from this photo I got in an email which shows how just how high it is at LSU and that's the same where I live.

    Brennan, I see you are in the same boat as me, only more upriver. (Just pray that we don't have to take that "boat ride" LITERALLY!! )
    Attached Images

  11. #51
    I have some work to do in Baton Rouge on Monday morning. I should be done mid-morning and have nothing else the rest of the day. I plan on heading back home the long and scenic way so I can drive across the Morganza if they haven't closed it off. I hope to get some pictures although I will need technical assistance to get phone pics uploaded here.
    "...Awake thou that sleepest, and arise from the dead, and Christ shall give thee light. See then that ye walk circumspectly, not as fools, but as wise, Redeeming the time, because the days are evil." - Ephesians 5:14-17

  12. #52
    Quote Originally Posted by Terriannie View Post
    So glad to see a reference to this Southern Version thread from the Midwest flood thread.

    They need to open those Morganza floodgates, sooner!!!

    A friend and I drove up the levee today (illegally, which is why I didn't get out for a pic) and sure enough, it's STILL much higher than it should be with just the Bonne Carre floodgates open. You can see from this photo I got in an email which shows how just how high it is at LSU and that's the same where I live.

    Brennan, I see you are in the same boat as me, only more upriver. (Just pray that we don't have to take that "boat ride" LITERALLY!! )
    Baton Rouge has been at near that level for a couple of weeks.
    "...Awake thou that sleepest, and arise from the dead, and Christ shall give thee light. See then that ye walk circumspectly, not as fools, but as wise, Redeeming the time, because the days are evil." - Ephesians 5:14-17

  13. #53
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    https://newschannel20.com/news/local...RhaPChdlM60gMs

    Amtrak suspends service between St. Louis and Texas
    by The Associated Press Friday, May 31st 2019

    ST. LOUIS (AP) — Amtrak says flooding is forcing it to suspend service between St. Louis and Fort Worth, Texas, until June 7. Amtrak officials said in a news release Friday that flooding has diverted freight train traffic onto tracks used by the passenger train service.

  14. #54
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    I have to drive up to the MS delta for a funeral on Monday...will try to get some work in too but really doesn’t seem feasible with the time the service is being held. I’ll also be in Vicksburg for work and I will try and go down to flood wall and see just how high it is there now...may not let me go down there. I honestly didn’t know they put off opening morganza spillway til I read the updates on this thread...will give an update once I get some info.

  15. #55
    https://www.theadvocate.com/baton_ro...87d25a6.html#1

    Photos, video: Crews prepare to sink barge in Bayou Chene to help with Morganza Spillway flooding

    ADVOCATE STAFF REPORT MAY 28, 2019 - 12:05 PM
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    Authorities began taking steps to sink a barge in Bayou Chene with the hope it will mean Iberville and nearby parishes are spared from devastating backwater flooding when the Morganza Spillway is opened.

    Crews are installing a barge in Bayou Chene - a tributary of the Atchafalaya River which leads into populated areas of Iberville, St. Martin, St. Mary, Terrebonne and Assumption parishes - and sink it, stopping the water flow.

    The spillway, if opened, would flood water into the Atchafalaya and down into those parishes, so putting the barge in place is intended to protect those residents from backwater flooding.

    The state recently approved $80 million in funding to place a permanent structure at Bayou Chene, but that construction will take several years.

    PICTURES AT LINK
    "...Awake thou that sleepest, and arise from the dead, and Christ shall give thee light. See then that ye walk circumspectly, not as fools, but as wise, Redeeming the time, because the days are evil." - Ephesians 5:14-17

  16. #56
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    I presume the Atchafalaya Basin was flooded entirely in 1927. That was before any of the control structures were in place. I wonder why the Mississippi didn't change course then. How did it end up back where it is?

  17. #57
    Quote Originally Posted by Delta View Post
    I presume the Atchafalaya Basin was flooded entirely in 1927. That was before any of the control structures were in place. I wonder why the Mississippi didn't change course then. How did it end up back where it is?
    Rivers change channels as silt builds up. Levees are built to keep the river in place but eventually the river bed is higher than the land around it.
    This Weather Underground article is a good summary of the situation: If the Old River Control Structure Fails: A Catastrophe With Global Impact May 14, 2019, .
    https://www.wunderground.com/cat6/If...-Global-Impact

  18. #58
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    Morganza Spillway Opening will Sink Farmers



    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BtGcKcu82Po

    5:44 minutes long
    People create their own questions because they are afraid to look straight. All you have to do is look straight and see the road, and when you see it, don't sit looking at it - walk. Ayn Rand

  19. #59
    Quote Originally Posted by Sandcastle76 View Post
    I have to drive up to the MS delta for a funeral on Monday...will try to get some work in too but really doesn’t seem feasible with the time the service is being held. I’ll also be in Vicksburg for work and I will try and go down to flood wall and see just how high it is there now...may not let me go down there. I honestly didn’t know they put off opening morganza spillway til I read the updates on this thread...will give an update once I get some info.
    Thanks that would be great. It's mostly below us, but nice to keep up with what's going on.

    Quote Originally Posted by Delta
    I presume the Atchafalaya Basin was flooded entirely in 1927. That was before any of the control structures were in place. I wonder why the Mississippi didn't change course then. How did it end up back where it is?
    I may be speaking out of turn here, but usually changes in the river course, is done by erosion, a very slow process. Flooding in comparison is something that happens quickly. Come up over the course of a couple of weeks, goes back down.

    River course change is usually done slowly by erosion where there is a turn in the river and the water/river keeps eating out portions until it cuts through to where the river comes back on the other side, and then fills in with silt, to make a cut off, or lake, until the next time it goes the other way.

    If that is wrong someone can correct.
    "Wise Men Still Seek Him"-bumper sticker

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  20. #60
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    This thread has been quite an education for me....and, I am sure, a great many other readers, as well.

    Thanks to all of you who are contributing ongoing information, as well as the history of these great rivers....I really appreciate learning how very vital they are to the transportation of everything, as well as to the global economy!

  21. #61
    Thanks from me, too. Between everything going on, I've doubled my container garden. I've also gently steered a good friend into putting in a little garden. She had one in the past, but wasn't going to do it this year. I think I was able to change her mind after telling her what I learned from this thread and the others about the flooding.

  22. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by tech View Post
    A bit of New Orleans is below sea level...that's it.

    Please think before posting...if most of South LA was below sea level, it would be under water already.
    New Orleans is like a bowl. It was originally built on the rim of the bowl, so no flooding to speak of. However, at some point building was done on the ridges of the bowl and then the middle, hence, flooding. This was the American sector, the French built on the rim. Greed.

    The wetlands of south Louisiana have been destroyed, building the industrial canal back when, hastened the demise. The wetland demise is largely responsible for the flooding in Katrina, blowing the levy didn't help. You live in the marsh are you are going to get flooded at some point.

    Judy

  23. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bardou View Post
    Morganza Spillway Opening will Sink Farmers



    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BtGcKcu82Po

    5:44 minutes long
    The farmers know this, its not new. The years that don't flood they make money and the times that the spill way is open they don't. It happens.

    Judy

  24. #64
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    -- from https://www.wunderground.com/cat6/If...-Global-Impact , part of a MUST READ series from WU.
    The wonder of our time isn’t how angry we are at politics and politicians; it’s how little we’ve done about it. - Fran Porretto
    -http://bastionofliberty.blogspot.com/2016/10/a-wholly-rational-hatred.html

  25. #65
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    The barriers breached in Burlington Iowa today, river expected to crest at 22.43 feet sometime tomorrow. Its raining here in central Wisc again tonight.

    Trump signed the emergency declaration for Louisiana. 80 comments on the story so far.

    https://www.nola.com/environment/201...louisiana.html

  26. #66
    I spent the morning on a bit of a reconnaissance mission and here is what I observed.

    The Atchafalaya is up, not alarmingly high, but given the amount of water that is about to be pumped into it, I will be interested to see what happens.

    The Mississippi at downtown Baton Rouge is about 10 feet from the top of the levee, that’s high. I drove across the old bridge in north Baton Rouge on the way out of town and the water level is way more noticeable there as it butts up against the bluffs at Southern University on the east and it spread out far more on the west bank, very near the levee top.

    I then drove to Morganza and drove across the spillway on Hwy. 1. There is an absolute $h*tload of water piled up on the river side. It is almost to the top of the spillway and has formed what looks like an inland sea. The dry side (for now) of the spillway is a good 15-20 feet lower than the water level on the other side. There are big flashing signs warning “NO STOPPING” and there was a sheriff at one end, so I didn’t stop.

    I then decided since I was only half an hour away, to drive up to the old river control structure. This is approximately 20 miles upriver from Morganza. For those that don’t know the old river control structure is the series of 4 locks spread over approximately 10 miles, near the confluence of the Red, Atchafalaya and Mississippi Rivers. You can drive across each of the structures on La. Hwy. 15. The first (southernmost) lock was not open but there were a couple of dozen barges, loaded up with boulders parked right beside it. The second lock was also closed. The last two however, appeared to have numerous gates open and the water was shooting through with fairly significant force. The water on the river side is significantly higher than the “dry” side and for lengthy portions of Hwy. 418 and Hwy. 15, the water is within 5-10 feet of the road (which is up on the levee). This water level is a good 20+ feet higher than the dry side. I’m not sure when all the Midwest water is getting here, but I don’t know where it’s going to go when it arrives.

    I took several pictures and if someone can give me a crash course on how to post iphone pics and/or videos, I will.
    "...Awake thou that sleepest, and arise from the dead, and Christ shall give thee light. See then that ye walk circumspectly, not as fools, but as wise, Redeeming the time, because the days are evil." - Ephesians 5:14-17

  27. #67
    This is a picture from the top of the levee at downtown Baton Rouge. Those red blocks on the river side are the very tops of huge letters that spell out Baton Rouge and which are typically completely visible.
    Attached Images
    "...Awake thou that sleepest, and arise from the dead, and Christ shall give thee light. See then that ye walk circumspectly, not as fools, but as wise, Redeeming the time, because the days are evil." - Ephesians 5:14-17

  28. #68
    Morganza Spillway river side
    Attached Images
    "...Awake thou that sleepest, and arise from the dead, and Christ shall give thee light. See then that ye walk circumspectly, not as fools, but as wise, Redeeming the time, because the days are evil." - Ephesians 5:14-17

  29. #69
    Morganza Spillway, river side on right, "dry" side on left
    Attached Images
    "...Awake thou that sleepest, and arise from the dead, and Christ shall give thee light. See then that ye walk circumspectly, not as fools, but as wise, Redeeming the time, because the days are evil." - Ephesians 5:14-17

  30. #70
    Morganza "inland sea"
    Attached Images
    "...Awake thou that sleepest, and arise from the dead, and Christ shall give thee light. See then that ye walk circumspectly, not as fools, but as wise, Redeeming the time, because the days are evil." - Ephesians 5:14-17

  31. #71
    OK, I think I got the pictures figured out. They are showing up for me. Let me know if not visible.
    "...Awake thou that sleepest, and arise from the dead, and Christ shall give thee light. See then that ye walk circumspectly, not as fools, but as wise, Redeeming the time, because the days are evil." - Ephesians 5:14-17

  32. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by BenIan View Post
    OK, I think I got the pictures figured out. They are showing up for me. Let me know if not visible.
    Yup I can see them. Thanks!

  33. #73
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    Sufficiently visible as to negatively impact the National Pucker Factor.
    RULE 1:
    THEY want you DEAD.

    "If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my brothers' children (and their parents) may have peace, and have NO KNOWLEDGE of what I have done."

    The BEST in Life:
    To CRUSH your enemies.
    To see them driven before you
    To listen to the lamentations of their women

  34. #74
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    It's raining, and heavily, to the south of Des Moines right now, that water will make its way into the Mississippi river.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  35. #75
    We've had about 3 weeks without any significant rain and temps in the low to mid 90s. However...this system has the potential to sneak it's way up here. These types of systems are typically big rain droppers here as they like to move on shore and just sit.

    https://www.accuweather.com/en/weath...egins/70008426

    Tropical threat may brew in Gulf of Mexico, send more downpours into central US this week


    The 2019 Atlantic hurricane season is officially underway, and the southwestern Gulf of Mexico may serve as the breeding ground for the next tropical depression or storm early this week.

    A broad area of unsettled weather traversing across the Bay of Campeche is being monitored for potential tropical development.

    An Air Force Reserve reconnaissance aircraft may be sent out to investigate the area on Monday afternoon, according to the National Hurricane Center.

    "There is a medium to high chance for tropical development in the Bay of Campeche," according to AccuWeather Hurricane Expert Dan Kottlowski. "That means the system could become a tropical depression and perhaps a tropical storm within the next 48 hours."

    The warm waters of the Bay of Campeche will provide the necessary fuel for the system to strengthen.

    There is also relatively low wind shear, or changing of wind speed and/or direction with altitude, over the Bay of Campeche, which provides a conducive environment for tropical features to organize.

    "Latest indications point toward the system moving inland near Tampico, Mexico, between late Monday and Tuesday," Kottlowski said. "The later the system moves inland, the more likely it could become a tropical depression or even a tropical storm."

    The next tropical storm that develops in the Atlantic will be called Barry.

    Should the feature manage to stay offshore and take a more northward track, perhaps paralleling the Mexico and South Texas coast, the chance of development to a tropical storm may be significantly greater. However, the feature will encounter more wind shear as it wanders farther north.

    Regardless of whether it strengthens into a full-fledged tropical system, heavy rainfall will continue to inundate Mexico and parts of Belize and Guatemala early this week. There can be an AccuWeather Local StormMax™ of 12 inches (300 mm) in the higher terrain of eastern Mexico.
    "...Awake thou that sleepest, and arise from the dead, and Christ shall give thee light. See then that ye walk circumspectly, not as fools, but as wise, Redeeming the time, because the days are evil." - Ephesians 5:14-17

  36. #76
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    1,423
    Great reporting and great pictures, Ben!

  37. #77
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    South Louisiana near New Orleans by the Mississippi River
    Posts
    12,116
    Thank you for taking the time for the reconnaissance and the pictures Ben!!!

    We can see now what we'll be up against should ANY of the big levees get compromised and it won't be just water in some houses!

  38. #78
    "...Awake thou that sleepest, and arise from the dead, and Christ shall give thee light. See then that ye walk circumspectly, not as fools, but as wise, Redeeming the time, because the days are evil." - Ephesians 5:14-17

  39. #79
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Central Iowa
    Posts
    42,205
    We’re going to get hammered here tomorrow, I feel for thos3 of you down stream.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  40. #80
    https://www.theadvocate.com/baton_ro...41bd249a4.html

    Morganza Spillway opening delayed... again; here's what new river level projections show

    BY EMMA KENNEDY | EKENNEDY@THEADVOCATE.COM JUN 3, 2019 - 2:08 PM

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has for a second time delayed the planned opening of the Morganza Spillway because of fluctuations on the Mississippi River, but many communities in the path of the floodwaters are braced whether the bays open or not.

    Heavy rainfall, flooding and snowmelt upriver led the Corps to announce last month that it would open the spillway Sunday. The opening was initially pushed back to Thursday because the Mississippi River hadn't met the flow rate necessary to trigger the spillway's opening. Monday afternoon, the Corps said it won't need to open the spillway to relieve pressure on Mississippi River levees south of Morganza until next Sunday.

    The double delay has left doubt some area residents wondering whether it will open at all, according to Atchafalaya Basin Levee District chairman John Grezaffi. For many, though, including farmers who’ve spent the last week hauling equipment and shutting down operations, countless dollars have already been spent.

    “I know a lot of people went to a great expense and there’s a lot at stake now whether you open it or don’t open it,” Grezaffi said.

    Grezaffi was on the board in 2011 — the last time the Morganza Spillway opened — and he remembers the 1973 opening. He said 2019 is hard to put side-by-side with the other openings due to the complexity and unpredictability of the river and the events up north, and he feels for the Corps trying to figure out the best way forward.

    “It’s kind of a new frontier right now trying to figure this river out. … I think Old Man River’s doing things that are unprecedented as far as trying to figure out what we should do,” he said.

    Farther downstream in an already-saturated Morgan City, St. Mary Parish Levee District executive director Tim Matte said the Bayou Chene barge — which usually spares St. Mary and surrounding parishes from backwater flooding in the face of a spillway opening — is almost in place, so residents are prepared but wary of more inundation.

    The National Hurricane Center is also predicting a weather disturbance near Mexico having a 60 percent chance of cyclone formation in the next 48 hours. Though it's not known yet which path that storm could take, dumping more rain on southern Louisiana or anywhere north around the Mississippi could make matters worse, Matte said.

    Morgan City residents can take some solace in the fact that a delayed spillway opening gives residents and businesses, particularly those along the riverfront, a few extra days of safeguarding.

    “If they weren’t already finished it takes some of the pressure off and allows folks to operate a little longer under closer to normal circumstances before they need to shut down,” Matte said.


    The Coastal Restoration and Protection Authority put up about $7 million to sink the barge, a cost that should be mostly recouped by state and federal emergency declarations in the last few weeks.

    But, Matte said, many of the businesses in the area have already suffered impacts from river rises and heavy rainfall that would only be exacerbated by the spillway opening. For now it’s a wait-and-see approach.

    “All you can do is prepare as best you can, and now it’s a matter of shoring up what you have and making any contingency plans you need,” he said.
    "...Awake thou that sleepest, and arise from the dead, and Christ shall give thee light. See then that ye walk circumspectly, not as fools, but as wise, Redeeming the time, because the days are evil." - Ephesians 5:14-17

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