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Trauma medical kit (blowout kit) - Do you have one? - Know how/when to use it?

View Poll Results: Do you carry/have trauma medical kit(s)

Voters
66. You may not vote on this poll
  • I have one on my person whenever I step out of the house

    6 9.09%
  • I keep a trauma medical kit in a vehicle/BOB/etc.

    41 62.12%
  • I carry nothing specific but might be able to improvise

    10 15.15%
  • I know basic first aid, but not sure about trauma medicine

    14 21.21%
  • what is trauma medical help?

    1 1.52%
Multiple Choice Poll.
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Results 41 to 80 of 92
  1. #41
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    May 2001
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    Quote Originally Posted by Broken Arrow View Post
    I have multiple trauma bags (animal and human) and i'm not afraid to use them! LOL!! Former EMT-I here.
    And you make my point for me. Thank you.

  2. #42
    Multiple Ekits here too, although mine seems to tends more to the Veterinarian side.

    I haven't seen anyone mention the treatment of Rattlesnake bites as a Trauma situation. I have Sawyer Bite and Sting kits and have had to use them. Went to a Rattlesnake Roundup once and every EMT was hovering over the pit with their Sawyer kit in hand. That was 20 years ago. Is there anything better nowdays?
    Don't be dismayed by goodbyes. A farewell is necessary before you can meet again. And meeting again, after moments or lifetimes, is certain for those who are friends. --Richard Bach

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seeker22 View Post
    Multiple Ekits here too, although mine seems to tends more to the Veterinarian side.

    I haven't seen anyone mention the treatment of Rattlesnake bites as a Trauma situation. I have Sawyer Bite and Sting kits and have had to use them. Went to a Rattlesnake Roundup once and every EMT was hovering over the pit with their Sawyer kit in hand. That was 20 years ago. Is there anything better nowdays?
    A few years ago at Western PA annual EMS conference, a Doctor from UPMC gave a very good presentation on snake bites, his opinion of the sawyer kit was, throw it in the garbage. About a week ago during an online debate about giving dogs benadryl for snakebite I ran across another article from another doctor that said there might be some benefit if you could use the sawyer kit in the first five minutes, after that waste of time.
    "The entire human race are neither my brothers nor kin. There is nothing noble about non-discrimination - concepts such as love, trust and brotherhood lose all meaning when discrimination is removed."

  4. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by Repairman-Jack View Post
    A few years ago at Western PA annual EMS conference, a Doctor from UPMC gave a very good presentation on snake bites, his opinion of the sawyer kit was, throw it in the garbage. About a week ago during an online debate about giving dogs benadryl for snakebite I ran across another article from another doctor that said there might be some benefit if you could use the sawyer kit in the first five minutes, after that waste of time.
    If I can't get my hands on a Sawyer in the first two minutes, I'm not trying very hard.
    Don't be dismayed by goodbyes. A farewell is necessary before you can meet again. And meeting again, after moments or lifetimes, is certain for those who are friends. --Richard Bach

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
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    Mississippi
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seeker22 View Post
    Multiple Ekits here too, although mine seems to tends more to the Veterinarian side.

    I haven't seen anyone mention the treatment of Rattlesnake bites as a Trauma situation. I have Sawyer Bite and Sting kits and have had to use them. Went to a Rattlesnake Roundup once and every EMT was hovering over the pit with their Sawyer kit in hand. That was 20 years ago. Is there anything better nowdays?
    Yeah, and this is one of those things that really concerns me here in the South with all of our different species of poisonous snakes. If the Sawyer kit isn't really that great for treatment, what is?
    Sherree

  6. #46
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    MN
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    2,550
    Here's a good read from Greg Ellifritz on tourniquets.

    https://www.activeresponsetraining.n...esearch-review
    Was known as dairyfarmer but sold the cows.

  7. #47
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    Sep 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by SouthernBreeze View Post
    Yeah, and this is one of those things that really concerns me here in the South with all of our different species of poisonous snakes. If the Sawyer kit isn't really that great for treatment, what is?
    Here are two decent articles from Journal of Emergency Medicine.

    https://www.jems.com/articles/print/...ing-snake.html

    https://www.jems.com/articles/2007/03/snakebites.html

    Treatment will vary a little depending on if the venom is hemotoxic or neurotoxic.

    High level treatment:

    "Keep the patient calm and reassured. Have them lie down and remain still and try to restrict overall movement. Monitor airway, breathing, circulation, disability (of nervous system), exposure/environmental control (protect from cold/water) and begin treatment immediately.

    Take the patient’s vital signs initially and repeatedly—at least every five minutes. Conserve the victim’s body heat. Also make note as to what first aid has already been attempted or delivered prior to EMS arrival. Protect the injured area and keep it clean and dry, even gently immobilizing the limb to prevent movement and pain. All jewelry or anything on the bitten limb should be removed as soon as possible."
    "The entire human race are neither my brothers nor kin. There is nothing noble about non-discrimination - concepts such as love, trust and brotherhood lose all meaning when discrimination is removed."

  8. #48
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    Sep 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jackpine Savage View Post
    Here's a good read from Greg Ellifritz on tourniquets.

    https://www.activeresponsetraining.n...esearch-review
    Yep...also just about 8 days ago they released the update with the added TQs

    Good break down of the "approved" TQs in this video (5:06 long)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=viRkIiaKhkY

    The list:

    Combat Application Tourniquet (CAT) Gen 7
    Combat Application Tourniquet (CAT) Gen 6
    Ratcheting Medical Tourniquet -Tactical (RMT-T)
    SAM Extremity Tourniquet (SAM-XT)
    SOF Tactical Tourniquet – Wide (SOFTT-W)
    Tactical Mechanical Tourniquet (TMT)
    TX2” Tourniquet (TX2)
    TX3” Tourniquet (TX3)

    PNEUMATIC LIMB TOURNIQUETS:

    Emergency & Military Tourniquet (EMT)
    Tactical Pneumatic Tourniquet 2” (TPT2)
    "The entire human race are neither my brothers nor kin. There is nothing noble about non-discrimination - concepts such as love, trust and brotherhood lose all meaning when discrimination is removed."

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
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    1 tank of fuel from potential chaos
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    3,578
    I always keep a tourniquet and chest seals at hand. Don't always have them EDC, all the time. Everyone at the Luddite hovel knows to grab the STOMP bag on their way out the door if there is the slightest chance they might not be home for a few days, or ever.

    A couple of extra IFAKs are around. I'd rather loan one than share MINE.
    "You are allowed to be disappointed but not surprised"

  10. #50
    Join Date
    May 2001
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    In CLE again
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    Have studies changed the percentage of dry bites from 85% recently??
    RULE 1:
    THEY want you DEAD.

    "If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my brothers' children (and their parents) may have peace, and have NO KNOWLEDGE of what I have done."

    The BEST in Life:
    To CRUSH your enemies.
    To see them driven before you
    To listen to the lamentations of their women

  11. #51
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
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    Mississippi
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    Quote Originally Posted by Repairman-Jack View Post
    Here are two decent articles from Journal of Emergency Medicine.

    https://www.jems.com/articles/print/...ing-snake.html

    https://www.jems.com/articles/2007/03/snakebites.html

    Treatment will vary a little depending on if the venom is hemotoxic or neurotoxic.

    High level treatment:

    "Keep the patient calm and reassured. Have them lie down and remain still and try to restrict overall movement. Monitor airway, breathing, circulation, disability (of nervous system), exposure/environmental control (protect from cold/water) and begin treatment immediately.

    Take the patient’s vital signs initially and repeatedly—at least every five minutes. Conserve the victim’s body heat. Also make note as to what first aid has already been attempted or delivered prior to EMS arrival. Protect the injured area and keep it clean and dry, even gently immobilizing the limb to prevent movement and pain. All jewelry or anything on the bitten limb should be removed as soon as possible."
    Thanks for those links! I read both of them. I guess what I was asking was how to treat snake bites without the use of antivenin or ER visits should we be in a SHTF event? I know that, before antivenin, lots of people died from snake bites, so is death almost a certainty?
    Sherree

  12. #52
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    May 2001
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    OK
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    Quote Originally Posted by Repairman-Jack View Post
    Yep...also just about 8 days ago they released the update with the added TQs

    Good break down of the "approved" TQs in this video (5:06 long)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=viRkIiaKhkY

    The list:

    Combat Application Tourniquet (CAT) Gen 7
    Combat Application Tourniquet (CAT) Gen 6
    Ratcheting Medical Tourniquet -Tactical (RMT-T)
    SAM Extremity Tourniquet (SAM-XT)
    SOF Tactical Tourniquet – Wide (SOFTT-W)
    Tactical Mechanical Tourniquet (TMT)
    TX2” Tourniquet (TX2)
    TX3” Tourniquet (TX3)

    PNEUMATIC LIMB TOURNIQUETS:

    Emergency & Military Tourniquet (EMT)
    Tactical Pneumatic Tourniquet 2” (TPT2)
    Is the SWAT-T tourniquet bad? It's not so easy to use as a CAT, but it folds/rolls down small and can be wrapped around a few things to make a decent EDC trauma kit.
    From post #11; https://medicalgearoutfitters.com/co...edc-trauma-kit.
    That's my EDC along with a small amount of duct tape for 1-2 improvised chest seals.

  13. #53
    Quote Originally Posted by 1911user View Post
    Is the SWAT-T tourniquet bad? It's not so easy to use as a CAT, but it folds/rolls down small and can be wrapped around a few things to make a decent EDC trauma kit.
    From post #11; https://medicalgearoutfitters.com/co...edc-trauma-kit.
    That's my EDC along with a small amount of duct tape for 1-2 improvised chest seals.
    The SWAT-T isn't bad, but it takes two hands to use and thus is not preferred for that reason. However, it is preferred for small children and anyone with thin arms. Since I'm more likely to be with children and the elderly than stomping around in the brush carrying a weapon, it's the tourniquet of choice for me.

  14. #54
    Quote Originally Posted by SouthernBreeze View Post
    Thanks for those links! I read both of them. I guess what I was asking was how to treat snake bites without the use of antivenin or ER visits should we be in a SHTF event? I know that, before antivenin, lots of people died from snake bites, so is death almost a certainty?
    I am aware of two herbalists that have treated poisonous snake bites.

    Dr. Patrick Jones, author of The HomeGrown Herbalist, is a veterinarian who has treated poisonous snake bites in his practice.

    Sam Coffman, author of The Herbal Medic, served as a medic in the military. He currently runs a clinic and teaches courses in person and online for using herbs. He has also treated snake bites in dogs. As I recall, he wouldn't do it in people for liability reasons, but for himself he'd do it in a heart beat. He has devoted an entire chapter in his book to treating venomous bites.

    Both these guys use Echinacea. But Sam has exact detail and other herbs and activated charcoal that he uses.

    I posted reviews of both books on my blog. For the Reader's Digest version: Sam's is triple the price at $60, but well worth every penny.

    Oh, and as far as the Sawyer snake bite kits are concerned, two ER/survival medicine docs I visited with said they're probably worthless EXCEPT that if the patient believes the kit will work, it will help the patient calm down and slow the heart rate a little. They wouldn't waste time on it, but if you have extra hands and someone else to use it while you do the really important stuff, it wouldn't hurt.

  15. #55
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    May 2001
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    OK
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    Quote Originally Posted by school marm View Post
    The SWAT-T isn't bad, but it takes two hands to use and thus is not preferred for that reason. However, it is preferred for small children and anyone with thin arms. Since I'm more likely to be with children and the elderly than stomping around in the brush carrying a weapon, it's the tourniquet of choice for me.
    If you are thinking of difficulty using on yourself, watch the last few minutes of this video. He shows how to start it one handed.
    (11:40) EDC Trauma Kit - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2zTOy3ELOp0

  16. #56
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    Sep 2008
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    PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by school marm View Post
    The SWAT-T isn't bad, but it takes two hands to use and thus is not preferred for that reason. However, it is preferred for small children and anyone with thin arms. Since I'm more likely to be with children and the elderly than stomping around in the brush carrying a weapon, it's the tourniquet of choice for me.
    Preferred by whom? Hartford Consensus? College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma? Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care?

    Frankly I wouldn't give two squirts for a windless TQ (other than pneumatic), If you are going to spend $25 on a rubber band, spend $29 and get a CAT or SOFTT-Wide.


    Pediatric Extremity Hemorrhage and Tourniquet Use:

    https://www.jems.com/articles/2018/1...iquet-use.html


    "Conclusion

    Current evidence suggests that direct pressure, commercial tourniquets and improvised tourniquets can adequately control pediatric extremity hemorrhage.

    Being prepared for an emergency requires dedicated and recurrent training. Practice bleeding control by applying direct pressure, a commercial tourniquet, and a cravat on a simulated (yet human, i.e., standardized) small patient.

    Take a moment to share the information you gained from this article, and from your own practice, with colleagues. Your knowledge, and the knowledge that you impart to others, will save lives"
    "The entire human race are neither my brothers nor kin. There is nothing noble about non-discrimination - concepts such as love, trust and brotherhood lose all meaning when discrimination is removed."

  17. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by school marm View Post
    I am aware of two herbalists that have treated poisonous snake bites.

    Dr. Patrick Jones, author of The HomeGrown Herbalist, is a veterinarian who has treated poisonous snake bites in his practice.

    Sam Coffman, author of The Herbal Medic, served as a medic in the military. He currently runs a clinic and teaches courses in person and online for using herbs. He has also treated snake bites in dogs. As I recall, he wouldn't do it in people for liability reasons, but for himself he'd do it in a heart beat. He has devoted an entire chapter in his book to treating venomous bites.

    Both these guys use Echinacea. But Sam has exact detail and other herbs and activated charcoal that he uses.

    I posted reviews of both books on my blog. For the Reader's Digest version: Sam's is triple the price at $60, but well worth every penny.

    Oh, and as far as the Sawyer snake bite kits are concerned, two ER/survival medicine docs I visited with said they're probably worthless EXCEPT that if the patient believes the kit will work, it will help the patient calm down and slow the heart rate a little. They wouldn't waste time on it, but if you have extra hands and someone else to use it while you do the really important stuff, it wouldn't hurt.
    Thank you, school marm! I will definitely be getting Sam's book. I'm a huge fan of herbal/alternative medicine! I have several books on the subject, but not anything having to do with snake bites.
    Sherree

  18. #58
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    845
    This month is National Stop the Bleed Month. https://www.bleedingcontrol.org/may . You can find many classes for bleeding control for free or low cost.

    A few Years ago my wife and I took a class from Lone Star Medics http://lonestarmedics.com/ and it was the best two day course we ever took. Caleb, our instructor, had a variety of gear that we were able to practice with. After the course I decided that I prefer the SOFT-Wide over the CAT Tourniquet, and have picked up quite a few. I even game some out over a few Christmas's. One of the things we did in class was practice self application of a tourniquet under a time limit of 12 seconds. The drill went that you were tossed a tourniquet and told which limb you had to apply; right arm for us right handed people was "fun".

    Another thing to be very careful of is where you buy your tourniquet's from. There are a lot of cheap knock off's out there that do not hold up under actual use. I've bought my recent ones from http://darkangelmedical.com/. Medical gear is not cheap, but you have to ask yourself if you really want to skimp on the item that just may save your life. The Kit I carry on my "bat belt", as the wife call's it, is the Dark Angel Dark Trauma. It does have some bits that I'm not trained to use, but the idea is to have it so if it's needed and there is someone there that IS trained to use it they'll have it.

    All bleeding stops eventually, ideally you'd rather to keep the blood IN the patient rather than out on the ground. In an active shooter event, Law Enforcement usually will not let medical on site until after the area is secure which can take minutes or longer and by that time someone is very likely to bleed out. I'd be willing to bet that if schools were stocked with trauma kits with gear to stop the bleed, there would be even fewer casualties. Basic training to stop bleeding isn't hard and can be done in less than a day. If I remember correctly, Tourniquet the limbs, high up on the limb not just above the wound because arteries can retract quite a bit; pack the joints (quick clot gauze would be ideal); and use a seal on the rest.

    Interestingly, our instructor told us that the civilian medical community is just starting to come around to accept the Military's standard of applying a tourniquet first rather than a last resort.

    Oh another thing I learned, using those black "medical gloves" is less than ideal, especially in low light, because it can sometimes be difficult to see the blood on your hands when you are doing your initial leak check.

    Other pieces of advice. Scene Safety is priority one, you can't help your patient if bullets are still flying and you get shot, hit, or whatever. Once things are secure, direct someone by pointing at them and tell them to call 911, then begin your assessment. If you just do a general shout out, people will most likely be too stunned to do it and assume someone else is doing it. Also learn the laws of your area of operation. If you can be held liable for any aid you try to render, then it's your own judgement call if you want to get involved. In Texas, last time I checked, the law is in favor of us trying to render aid. Licensed people have their own rules and should already know them.

    As always consult your local physician in the case of medical emergencies. The advice here is my opinion based upon what I learned and is not intended to be a medical opinion.

  19. #59
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    Might I point out that some time back there was talk of using a stun gun to electrically decompose the venom. I think that had been tossed out by now.
    "...Cry 'Havoc' and let slip the cats of war..."
    Itís a real pisser when your belief system gets T-boned by reality.
    Iím not afraid of dying...I just donít want to be there!
    ...sell your cloak, and buy a sword...Second Amendment 1.0

  20. #60
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    May 2004
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    N. Minnesota
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    Yep...on the revival in the use of tourniquets. I was able to help out with a training lab a couple of times not long before I retired for a couple of Army National Guard medical units heading for deployment to Afghanistan. That's just about when the .mil world started preaching to the civilian emergency medical community to get over being afraid of using tourniquets even if time to evacuation is delayed. They are lifesavers on the battlefield and everywhere else, too. Massively sharp bunch of folks, taught by some the most knowledgeable the service had to offer, and were presenting the latest and greatest to the units. Those are days when you'd pay admission to go to work.

  21. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Repairman-Jack View Post
    Preferred by whom? Hartford Consensus? College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma? Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care?

    Frankly I wouldn't give two squirts for a windless TQ (other than pneumatic), If you are going to spend $25 on a rubber band, spend $29 and get a CAT or SOFTT-Wide.

    (snip)
    $25 gets the SWAT-T tourniquet, a flat NAR pressure bandage, compressed gauze, and the vasoline dressing (chest seal material). The SWAT-T is about $12 separately. For EDC considerations, it's small when rolled or folded compared to any windlass-type tourniquet. The guy in the video showing how to use the SWAT-T one-handed uses and prefers CATs unless trying to put one in a small pocket. Also, the rubber strip (SWAT-T) works well in pressure bandage (non-tourniquet) situations.

    For smaller tourniquets and EDC, there is also the RAT (Rapid Application Tourniquet) which uses a narrow strap and has a pressure/tie-off bar. I recall a video discussing how it might be better for child/dog use since it is narrow; I'll look for it tonight.

    EDIT: - link to RATs tourniquet removed by me - They seem to be a bad choice -
    Last edited by 1911user; 05-14-2019 at 07:29 PM.

  22. #62
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    From my limited experience, this killed many.

    Shock: The Quiet Killer Of Trauma Victims
    - Firehouse
    Search domain http://www.firehouse.com/home/news/1...trauma-victims
    Shock: The Quiet Killer Of Trauma Victims May 1, 1996 Garry Briese 0.
    B 4 1 502

    One's Perceived Valor is greatly enhanced by a Keyboard......Me.

  23. #63
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    Israeli T3 bandages are nice to have in a kit as well.
    We are fast approaching the stage of the ultimate inversion:
    the stage where the government is free to do anything it pleases, while the citizens may act only by permission;
    which is the stage of the darkest periods of human history, the stage of rule by brute force.
    -Ayn Rand

  24. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1911user View Post
    $25 gets the SWAT-T tourniquet, a flat NAR pressure bandage, compressed gauze, and the vasoline dressing (chest seal material). The SWAT-T is about $12 separately. For EDC considerations, it's small when rolled or folded compared to any windlass-type tourniquet. The guy in the video showing how to use the SWAT-T one-handed uses and prefers CATs unless trying to put one in a small pocket. Also, the rubber strip (SWAT-T) works well in pressure bandage (non-tourniquet) situations.

    For smaller tourniquets and EDC, there is also the RAT (Rapid Application Tourniquet) which uses a narrow strap and has a pressure/tie-off bar. I recall a video discussing how it might be better for child/dog use since it is narrow; I'll look for it tonight.

    https://www.amazon.com/RATS-Rapid-Ap.../dp/B07CH2Y8WS
    #^@%ing RATs is more garbage, but hey anyone can buy what they want...do I want to trust my life, the life of a family member, friend with something tested/proven and accepted by people that use them real world, or well something else...hell I'd buy a knockoff CAT from Amazon or ebay before a non-windless.
    "The entire human race are neither my brothers nor kin. There is nothing noble about non-discrimination - concepts such as love, trust and brotherhood lose all meaning when discrimination is removed."

  25. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1911user View Post
    $25 gets the SWAT-T tourniquet, a flat NAR pressure bandage, compressed gauze, and the vasoline dressing (chest seal material). The SWAT-T is about $12 separately. For EDC considerations, it's small when rolled or folded compared to any windlass-type tourniquet. The guy in the video showing how to use the SWAT-T one-handed uses and prefers CATs unless trying to put one in a small pocket. Also, the rubber strip (SWAT-T) works well in pressure bandage (non-tourniquet) situations.

    For smaller tourniquets and EDC, there is also the RAT (Rapid Application Tourniquet) which uses a narrow strap and has a pressure/tie-off bar. I recall a video discussing how it might be better for child/dog use since it is narrow; I'll look for it tonight.

    https://www.amazon.com/RATS-Rapid-Ap.../dp/B07CH2Y8WS
    The Rat is a controversial tourniquet. Many don't like it because it takes a little longer to apply and does not close and lock securely. It's a stretchy tube with a catch notch.

  26. #66
    [QUOTE=Repairman-Jack;7283531]Preferred by whom? Hartford Consensus? College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma? Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care?

    Frankly I wouldn't give two squirts for a windless TQ (other than pneumatic), If you are going to spend $25 on a rubber band, spend $29 and get a CAT or SOFTT-Wide.

    Thanks for the article link. I found it informative.

    When selecting medical equipment and supplies, I prefer to go with what I can actually use, and what physicians I trust have suggested. Both were ER docs. One was attached to a Special Forces unit, and the other was currently practicing as a family physician. And both said the SWAT-T was just fine. In a mass casualty situation with small children, a SWAT-T might be even better, because it could be cut in half to save two children. In my particular situation, I do not have the finger strength to use a CAT or SOFT type tourniquet. At my age, nothing is going to change that.

    Some people will stand on principles and only use one brand. Some choose to work with the tools they can manage. A SWAT-T is a perfectly acceptable choice. No, it wouldn't be my first choice in battle and in dealing with adult males. But in all likelihood, I won't be dealing with either. It only makes sense to prepare for what is most likely first.
    Last edited by school marm; 05-14-2019 at 02:53 PM.

  27. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jez View Post
    The Rat is a controversial tourniquet. Many don't like it because it takes a little longer to apply and does not close and lock securely. It's a stretchy tube with a catch notch.
    I don't own a RAT and had not planned to buy one. Also won't bother trying to find video about it tonight. That should have been a clue when medical gear outfitters didn't list them anymore. Had to go to amazon to find a RAT to link.

  28. #68
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    Ya know...I keep a web dog leash/horse lead in the pocket of the truck door. That and a stick or a screwdriver makes a darned effective TQ in a pinch. More often useful for the stray dog and horse in my experience, but there ya go.

  29. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by school marm View Post
    Everybody has boo-boo kits in their BOBs.

    DH and DS carry IFAKs when they go shooting. If they're carrying a firearm, they're carrying an IFAK, including a tourniquet.

    We pack the advanced kit when we go to outdoor 3-D archery tournaments. It stays in the truck. We carry a modified boo-boo kit as we walk the course.

    The advanced medical kit is kept in the house and ready to go with us to evacuate. We use it all the time, mostly for the animals. It keeps us familiar with where everything is.

    We are not stopping to render aid on road in all likelihood. People are too crazy and I usually have my daughters with me.

    We are also 30 minutes at best from a hospital. Ambulances are usually at least 20 minutes out. If someone's at the top of our property, that's at least another 15 minutes tacked on, but for a major injury, like we'd call an ambulance for, it's probably another 30-45 minutes. (It's very steep, rugged terrain.)

    So we've taken some off-grid medicine courses (me--3, DD--2, DH--1). No, they do not make us doctors or nurses or EMTs. But as the docs teaching the classes and the doctor-authors of off-grid medicine books point out, most of what we're going to see post-TEOTWAWKI is within our ability to manage with some basic training and practice. Do I want to deal with a pneumothorax? No! But if it happened to my husband or so at the top of our property (and no, there's no place a helicopter could land, either) and only other option is death, I'll do it.

    The docs all say that tampons and napkins are great for absorbing blood and maybe work as a pressure dressing for a minor wound. But they're likely not going to work for major bleeding. However, you use what you've got.

    We know (or knew) how to use most of the stuff we have, but not all. We also stockpile things we aren't skilled enough to use, but which a physician might use for our family post-collapse. Better to have and not need, than to need and not have.

    Reasonable Rascal is one of several authors of a good survival medicine book. You can download it and print it for free.

    Survival and Austere Medicine, 3rd Edition


    Thank you and a special thanks to Reasonable Rascal for a most excellent book.
    ďI never saw a wild thing sorry for itself. A small bird will drop frozen dead from a bough without ever having felt sorry for itself.Ē
    D. H. Lawrence

  30. #70
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
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    Posts
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    My kit is based on my police officer son's pack, established by an amazing trainer for the Anchorage police department. His first day after FTO, he save a life using his training during an active shooter scenario. It's a very good, complete kit. Fortunately, my dear DIL - who is a PA - agreed to train me in some more advanced first aid, including sutures and even gave me a very good kit to add to my bag.

    I want to continue my own training and try to keep my kit complete and up-to-date.
    All that is gold does not glitter....

  31. #71
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Back in Iowa, where I belong
    Posts
    3,040
    Quote Originally Posted by TerryK View Post
    Thank you and a special thanks to Reasonable Rascal for a most excellent book.
    Author-signed copies are available in either soft- or hardcover (B/W only).

    I'm not going to wade into the tourniquet thing save to offer the latest and greatest recommends from the experts. From the Joint Trauma System (JTS) / Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care (CoTCCC):

    UPDATED 06 MAY 2019 based on the recent CoTCCC review and recommendations of limb tourniquets.

    Specifically this document covers:

    ​Tourniquets (Non-Pneumatic)
    Tourniquets (Pneumatic)
    Hemostatics
    Junctional Tourniquets
    Airway Management Devices
    https://books.allogy.com/web/tenant/...6dc411abef.pdf

    Wife and I both have car kits as well as goodies by the case around the house. What some folks here are calling 'advanced' or 'high level' I tend to regard as just meeting general standards. Heinlein's admonition comes to mind: A man should be able to...

    RR
    Survival and Austere Medicine: An Introduction - 2nd and 3rd Editions Contributing author and editor

    Get your FREE copy of the 3rd edition here:NNPG Download Site

    Reddit AustereMedicine/

  32. #72
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Central Iowa
    Posts
    42,880
    Quote Originally Posted by Millwright View Post
    I carry the basics.

    Bandaids, tribiotic, 4x4s, tape, alcohol pads, quick clot powder...need to replace my QC bandages that got used.

    Army combat bandages.

    Suture kit
    & clean syringes.

    Vet wrap, gloves & other standard this-n-thats.


    Really need to inventory, restock & replace dated stuff.
    Be careful with that suture kit, most of those needles for sewing someone back up are the wrong size.

    That said it's called a Jump Kit NOT a blowout kit. I was an EMT for five years and worked in a trauma hospital ER during that time as well, and Dennis is correct most of the people here are far from qualified outside of applying pressure, a bandaid or calling 911. If you can swing it take a basic first aid course some time, look for one that includes the updated protocol for CPR.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  33. #73
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
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    Central Iowa
    Posts
    42,880
    Quote Originally Posted by Jez View Post
    That is a BIG no no and VERY BAD IDEA. Tampons and their ilk are designed to absorb blood and will take longer to clot.
    Actually, it's not a bad idea at all, especially if that big bleed is coming from the nose. Pads and tampons actually allow ER staff know much blood was loss. You get clotting by applying pressure which can be hard to do with a big bleed and all you have is a handful of rags or paper towels, and those won't inform you as to how much blood was lost. Btw one of those Always overnight super duty pads holds exactly one pint of blood.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  34. #74
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    OK
    Posts
    6,344
    Some trauma medical related videos that may be of interest.

    (9:57) - Top Misconceptions About Tourniquets - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r50-lWDsmcI

    (4:13) - When you should use a TQ or Wound Pack?? - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cuyuJmEtTZ0

    (7:49) - Building a K9 Kit For Your Dog - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dFrMIrpVydQ

    (6:16) - Trauma Dressing / Pressure Bandage - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0dr5yuoBOF4

    (3:49) - Wound Packing Demo - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6np3RvDAWug

    (4:39) - Halo vs Hyfin Chest Seals - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ppOXsk3NUD0

    (10:45) - Budget Chest Seal (Making an Occlusive dressing) - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OBjREGhuHJg

    (5:24) - Gen 7 Combat Application Tourniquet C-A-T - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p2ZAiA-iFIo

    (8:14) - SWAT-Tourniquet Review - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-wr9uwj2-i0

  35. #75
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    PA
    Posts
    1,338
    Quote Originally Posted by 1911user View Post
    I don't own a RAT and had not planned to buy one. Also won't bother trying to find video about it tonight. That should have been a clue when medical gear outfitters didn't list them anymore. Had to go to amazon to find a RAT to link.
    There has also been some hubbub with the guy that made it, including buying domain names that would direct CAT searches to his RATs crap where he had some write ups with failures of CAT TQs, which there were like GEN1 maybe 2 versions, the plastic windless failed on occasion (which was why years ago I went with the Gen 2 SOFTT as it has a metal windless. Currently in the Region 13 area of PA CAT is the go to TQ, the Region has passed out to most every EMS and Fire Dept that runs a certified QRS service.
    "The entire human race are neither my brothers nor kin. There is nothing noble about non-discrimination - concepts such as love, trust and brotherhood lose all meaning when discrimination is removed."

  36. #76
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
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    The gret stet o' Virginny
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    Where should I begin my local search for civilian trauma training? SE Virginia
    Don't start nuthin', then won't be nuthin'

  37. #77
    Join Date
    May 2001
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    OK
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bumpkin View Post
    Where should I begin my local search for civilian trauma training? SE Virginia
    Something like this would be a good option. He's in Easley, SC and occasionally offers 1-day classes on trauma medicine. There is one May 25, but it shows full. Many of the youtube videos I posted in this thread are by him (skinny medic).
    https://medicalgearoutfitters.com/pr...c-trauma-class

    Another option would be an EMT training class at a local community college, but that takes a semester or 2 worth of day or evening classes.

    A "wilderness medical" training class should be valuable, but I'm not sure where to find those close to SE Virginia.

    It's always a good idea to get as much local first aid training as possible. A broken bone or bad burn might not kill in under 10 minutes, but it still requires serious first aid help.

    At a minimum, you can learn a lot from carefully selected youtube videos. It doesn't make you an EMT or replace hands-on training classes. Watch enough and you'll be way ahead of most people on what to do in a trauma medical situation.

  38. #78
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    OK
    Posts
    6,344
    I had forgotten that a thread is bumped whenever someone votes in the poll. While it is bumped...

    Per the poll, quite a few here have some kind of trauma kit and presumably the knowledge to use it, but there are others that could use additional med knowledge.

    Bumpkin had a very good question about med training last night. I'm curious what the medical professionals here would consider for trauma med training. Same for first aid training.
    -
    -
    -
    Admin type notice: once this thread falls to page 2 or 3 on Main, it will be moved by a mod to the Survival Medicine section of TB2K for future reference.
    -
    -
    Last edited by 1911user; 05-16-2019 at 02:07 PM. Reason: bolded admin notice

  39. #79
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Happy on the mountain
    Posts
    69,465
    Start with a Red Cross first aid class. There should be CPR and AED training available nearby too - https://www.redcross.org/take-a-clas...cOyA&gclsrc=ds

    Check your local community college for a basic EMT class. Here, the local rescue squad will pay your way all the way up to Paramedic if you volunteer for the unit. Your local unit might have a deal like that also. Training plus hands on in the field will really cement your skills and make you better at getting bled on by strangers.

    Far as I know BTLS (basic trauma life support) comes next, then ATLS (advanced trauma life support). Or you can branch off to wilderness medical response, if that appeals to you - https://www.wildmed.com/wilderness-medical-courses/. And so on.

    But get the basics first -
    The wonder of our time isnít how angry we are at politics and politicians; itís how little weíve done about it. - Fran Porretto
    -http://bastionofliberty.blogspot.com/2016/10/a-wholly-rational-hatred.html

  40. #80
    Join Date
    May 2001
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    Illinois
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    Quote Originally Posted by Profit of Doom View Post
    Might I point out that some time back there was talk of using a stun gun to electrically decompose the venom. I think that had been tossed out by now.
    I read that using the magneto spark from a lawnmower to the wound will so something to the venom. Brown recluse bites, too. Can't recall where I read it.
    "Freedom is not something to be secured in any one moment of time. We must struggle to preserve it every day. And freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction."
    -Ronald Reagan

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