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FOOD Video- This Cajun Restaurant Has a Year Long Waiting List (03:14 RT)
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  1. #1
    I dated a girl from Galliano. That's pretty much way out there.
    Better to be a warrior in a garden than a gardener in a war.

  2. #2
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    Video- This Cajun Restaurant Has a Year Long Waiting List (03:14 RT)

    Little stories like this are what make America.
    ==============

    https://www.chonday.com/35031/cajunyear7/

    RT 03:14

    This Cajun Restaurant Has a Year Long Waiting List

    In an unassuming building in Galliano, Louisiana, Alzina Toups makes some of the best food you’ll ever eat. But while her Jambalaya, fried shrimp and other garlic-laden Cajun staples are sure to bless your tongue and break your heart, they aren’t so easy to come by. Alzina doesn’t take walk-ins, and reservations—which book up a year in advance—can only be made by reaching her by landline.
    The wonder of our time isn’t how angry we are at politics and politicians; it’s how little we’ve done about it. - Fran Porretto
    -http://bastionofliberty.blogspot.com/2016/10/a-wholly-rational-hatred.html

  3. #3
    What a sweet looking woman. I bet her cooking is amazing-- wish I could try it!

  4. #4
    Cajun cooking is all over the map. This perticular restaurant is in the news because it's in the news, but anything you stumble over can be the best thing you ever found. The best gumbo in the world was outside of Bunkie, when I found it. Probably long gone, now. It's not about the One True Place, it's about staying alert to the possibilities.
    Better to be a warrior in a garden than a gardener in a war.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by bw View Post
    I dated a girl from Galliano. That's pretty much way out there.
    Ok... how are you managing to reply to posts BEFORE .they are posted!? This is thevsecond one I've seen... and you managed to post before the OP did! Intergalactic time warp?

    Summerthyme

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by summerthyme View Post
    Ok... how are you managing to reply to posts BEFORE .they are posted!? This is thevsecond one I've seen... and you managed to post before the OP did! Intergalactic time warp?
    PFM
    Better to be a warrior in a garden than a gardener in a war.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by summerthyme View Post
    Ok... how are you managing to reply to posts BEFORE .they are posted!? This is thevsecond one I've seen... and you managed to post before the OP did! Intergalactic time warp?

    Summerthyme
    You noticed that too? Weird.

  8. #8
    I'm guessing that the clocks on the two servers aren't in sync.
    Better to be a warrior in a garden than a gardener in a war.

  9. #9
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    I've noticed that board time and the time on my phone are almost a minute off.

    Normally they are a lot closer.
    Proud Infidel...............and Cracker

    Member: Nowski Brigade

    Deplorable


  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by summerthyme View Post
    Ok... how are you managing to reply to posts BEFORE .they are posted!? This is thevsecond one I've seen... and you managed to post before the OP did! Intergalactic time warp?

    Summerthyme
    YEP I saw that to and I had to look at it for a few minutes.

    That a weird one for sure.

  11. #11
    She has been on one of Andrew Zimmer's Shows.

    Also is a Trapper friend of mines aunt.

  12. #12
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    Wow, I never knew she existed and I'm a fair driving distance from Galliano!

    Such a sweet woman. She reminds me of DH's aunt who passed away. Her Cajun accent was so thick, I could hardly understand her when I first moved here but now, after over 40 years, I feel I know another language!!!

    She's right about true Cajun cooking. It is the BEST and you won't get the real stuff in the cities. Cities cook for tourists which is "passable" but for true Cajun, you HAVE to go to the country!!!

  13. #13
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    What a sweet lady. She reminds me of my grandmother. Bless her soul.

    Cajun food is comfort food to me. As a descendant of the Landry family, I grew up on great Cajun food. I'm talking about Don's Seafood era in Lafayette, before Tillman Fertitta turned the Landry's recipes into pig-slop.

    Cooked wild mallard, dove and sausage gumbo this past Sunday. Probably not near as delish as Alzina's, but I'll keep trying! The secret is in the roux.

  14. #14
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    Food is subjective. People who rant over one restaurant and I go try it, I walk out wondering what all the gloating was about. I've tried Emeril's cooking and BAM! wasn't impressed. Another one is Curtis Stone. People rant about his food and it left me wanting....not to eat any more of it. I'm not a fan of pork belly. Never get your expectations up too high.
    People create their own questions because they are afraid to look straight. All you have to do is look straight and see the road, and when you see it, don't sit looking at it - walk. Ayn Rand

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by LostMyMind View Post
    I'm talking about Don's Seafood era in Lafayette, before Tillman Fertitta turned the Landry's recipes into pig-slop.
    Got introduced to gumbo at Don's in Baton Rouge in the early 70's. There was always a crowd standing waiting for a table.
    Better to be a warrior in a garden than a gardener in a war.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by LostMyMind View Post
    What a sweet lady. She reminds me of my grandmother. Bless her soul.

    Cajun food is comfort food to me. As a descendant of the Landry family, I grew up on great Cajun food. I'm talking about Don's Seafood era in Lafayette, before Tillman Fertitta turned the Landry's recipes into pig-slop.

    Cooked wild mallard, dove and sausage gumbo this past Sunday. Probably not near as delish as Alzina's, but I'll keep trying! The secret is in the roux.
    You got that right!

    Transplanted here, (by my Cajun husband I met when he was in the Navy in California) I was taught how to make it by my MIL, but it took me almost a YEAR to get it JUST RIGHT! I can't tell you how many times I burned the roux because it went SECONDS over dark brown to burnt-smelling, dark brown.

    The secret is low heat and slowly stir, watch, slowly stir, watch, slowly stir, watch and when it gets to that perfect dark brown like a penny, take it off the heat, FAST!!!

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terriannie View Post
    You got that right!

    Transplanted here, (by my Cajun husband I met when he was in the Navy in California) I was taught how to make it by my MIL, but it took me almost a YEAR to get it JUST RIGHT! I can't tell you how many times I burned the roux because it went SECONDS over dark brown to burnt-smelling, dark brown.

    The secret is low heat and slowly stir, watch, slowly stir, watch, slowly stir, watch and when it gets to that perfect dark brown like a penny, take it off the heat, FAST!!!
    Once you start, there is no walking away.

    Fill your glass of wine before starting.
    Proud Infidel...............and Cracker

    Member: Nowski Brigade

    Deplorable


  18. #18
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    6

    Quote Originally Posted by Terriannie View Post
    You got that right!

    Transplanted here, (by my Cajun husband I met when he was in the Navy in California) I was taught how to make it by my MIL, but it took me almost a YEAR to get it JUST RIGHT! I can't tell you how many times I burned the roux because it went SECONDS over dark brown to burnt-smelling, dark brown.

    The secret is low heat and slowly stir, watch, slowly stir, watch, slowly stir, watch and when it gets to that perfect dark brown like a penny, take it off the heat, FAST!!!
    Terriannie, glad you finally made it to Louisiana! The best place on Earth...of course...I'm a bit biased. My mother was the first generation in our family to speak English as a first language. We're descendants of the original Acadian families, the Olivier de Vezins out of St. Martinville.

    While I learned to cook roux on the stovetop in a cast iron skillet, I switched over to cooking it in the oven. I still use the stovetop when feeling nostalgic, however, the oven method makes it almost impossible to burn. You almost have to TRY to screw it up. It also frees up your hands to start Holy Trinity prep.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Millwright View Post
    Once you start, there is no walking away.

    Fill your glass of wine before starting.
    You got that correct!

    Some in our family drink wine while cookin' roux, some drink beer. Ask their opinion about how it takes for perfect, dark roux and they'll say "About two beers". lol

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by LostMyMind View Post
    Terriannie, glad you finally made it to Louisiana! The best place on Earth...of course...I'm a bit biased. My mother was the first generation in our family to speak English as a first language. We're descendants of the original Acadian families, the Olivier de Vezins out of St. Martinville.

    While I learned to cook roux on the stovetop in a cast iron skillet, I switched over to cooking it in the oven. I still use the stovetop when feeling nostalgic, however, the oven method makes it almost impossible to burn. You almost have to TRY to screw it up. It also frees up your hands to start Holy Trinity prep.
    I totally agree that it is the best place on earth even with the heat, humidity, mosquitos and hurricanes! Your description of your mother is almost the same with DH's mother. She and his father spoke French fluently but other than a few phrases, he and his brothers and sisters never learned it because the parents would switch to French whenever they wanted to talk about "things" (scandles/gossip, etc.) without "little ears" to hear. (She later regretted it.)

    After DH got out of the Navy, originally, we planned to stay here for just a little while, save a bit, then move back to San Diego where the weather is almost perfect and we had friends. However, almost as soon as I arrived here, I was hooked!

    Not just the food but the people here told me I'm in a very special place and they can HAVE California! I think he was shocked when I told him I wanted to make this my home to raise our children, and I thank the Good Lord we NEVER moved back!!!!

    About your roux, I'm intrigued!!! Anything to keep me from standing at the stove forever would help. Could you please tell me what temp. you put the oven on? High heat, or low and slow?

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by summerthyme View Post
    Ok... how are you managing to reply to posts BEFORE .they are posted!? This is thevsecond one I've seen... and you managed to post before the OP did! Intergalactic time warp?

    Summerthyme
    He's on the clock at an Alphabet agency?
    Proud member Alt-Right group "Scientists For Trump". (Smart Americans know he's right.)
    A man should only take a wife whose Bible includes Genesis, Leviticus, Deuteronomy, Colossians, Malachi, Isaiah, Ephesians, Corinthians, Hebrews, Timothy, Titus, Proverbs, Mark, Peter & Revelation. Ecclesiastes 7:28 (NIV) tells him the odds.

  22. #22
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    Are you Catholic?

    Can you speak French?

    Can you make a roux?



    Essential questions for a potential Cajun wife, so say my Cajun cousins (some of whom now live in Colorado, but hey...)
    The wonder of our time isn’t how angry we are at politics and politicians; it’s how little we’ve done about it. - Fran Porretto
    -http://bastionofliberty.blogspot.com/2016/10/a-wholly-rational-hatred.html

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by summerthyme View Post
    Ok... how are you managing to reply to posts BEFORE .they are posted!? This is thevsecond one I've seen... and you managed to post before the OP did! Intergalactic time warp?

    Summerthyme

    I've seen this on several threads in the past 24 hours, I suspect it's because there's a glitch with the new SSL cert, it can happen.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dozdoats View Post
    Are you Catholic?

    Can you speak French?

    Can you make a roux?



    Essential questions for a potential Cajun wife, so say my Cajun cousins (some of whom now live in Colorado, but hey...)

    Sounds accurate!
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by LostMyMind View Post
    What a sweet lady. She reminds me of my grandmother. Bless her soul.

    Cajun food is comfort food to me. As a descendant of the Landry family, I grew up on great Cajun food. I'm talking about Don's Seafood era in Lafayette, before Tillman Fertitta turned the Landry's recipes into pig-slop.

    Cooked wild mallard, dove and sausage gumbo this past Sunday. Probably not near as delish as Alzina's, but I'll keep trying! The secret is in the roux.
    I've got some Landry's on my mom's side of the family tree. Back in the day a lot of the Mi'kmaq were rounded up by the Brits and deported to Louisana and dumped off in the swamps being left to die. Eventually, when the French regained control of Newfoundland, Labrador, and Quebec, a lot of those people made their way back home. A good many of them stayed in LA however, did some research on the family tree for two of my cousins as it was easier for me to get the information since I live in the states. What I found really interesting is how some of those ancestors ended up at Pine Ridge and Rose Bud reservations.
    People are quick to confuse and despise confidence as arrogance but that is common amongst those who have never accomplished anything in their lives and who have always played it safe not willing to risk failure.

  26. #26
    If you want a popular restaurant, make above average food and limit your capacity. We had a small restaurant for years that only served 25 people a night and it was by reservation only. It was always about 6 months to get a reservation. Never went because it was way to pricey for me but I talked to lots of people that said the food was very good but not spectacular and they wouldn't go back. The guy claimed to be a chef from Chicago and he made money there because he did it all himself by only serving a limited number of customers. He was cook, waiter, dishwasher, cashier, etc. It became a status symbol for some people to be able to tell people they finally got to eat there. Oddity sells. We have a restaurant about 25 miles from us called the Moonshine Store that has a website you can look up. Used to be a general store but it is out in the middle of nowhere surrounded by miles of farm ground. Serves basically nothing but hamburgers and cheeseburgers and bagged potato chips. Busy everyday and people come from other states just to say they ate there. The hamburgers are just the greasy old burgers you used to get at any burger joint back in the day. Once a year they have a Moonshine Lunch Run day and the last I knew they were over 3,000 burgers sold on the last one and they're only open from something like 11:00 to 2:00.

  27. #27
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    Serves basically nothing but hamburgers and cheeseburgers and bagged potato chips

    Do one thing, do it well and stick to what you know.

    Like Melvin's in Elizabethtown, NC
    The wonder of our time isn’t how angry we are at politics and politicians; it’s how little we’ve done about it. - Fran Porretto
    -http://bastionofliberty.blogspot.com/2016/10/a-wholly-rational-hatred.html

  28. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by summerthyme View Post
    Ok... how are you managing to reply to posts BEFORE .they are posted!? This is thevsecond one I've seen... and you managed to post before the OP did! Intergalactic time warp?

    Summerthyme
    Quote Originally Posted by MinnesotaSmith View Post
    He's on the clock at an Alphabet agency?
    That's what I had come to mind, as well.
    A gentle answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger. - Proverbs 15:1

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