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HEALTH They donít make baby poop like they did in 1926, thatís for sure. Hereís why scientists care.
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  1. #1
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    They donít make baby poop like they did in 1926, thatís for sure. Hereís why scientists care.

    http://www.popsci.com/page-2?utm_sou...nt=post#page-2


    They donít make baby poop like they did in 1926, thatís for sure. Hereís why scientists care.

    Our stool is a window into the health of our guts.
    By Claire Maldarelli
    March 16, 2018

    Most of us do our best not to think too much about baby poop. But, as it turns out, stool has a lot more power than we thinkóand not just in terms of its pungent smell. Our poops can say a lot about our health, and thatís true from the first time we soil a diaper.

    Recently, researchers have found that the bacteria that live inside our gutsóknown as the microbiomeóare crucial to keeping us healthy. But understanding which bacteria help and which hurtóand how we can maintain a gut full of ďhealthy bacteriaĒóis still something that scientists are figuring out. Studying an infantís stool might be a key way to do so.

    During the first year of life, as a baby is growing, their intestines are fostering a nursery of bacteria. Those microbes are important in that they help to digest food and create a healthy immune system. But our microbiomes may not be as healthy as they once were. Back in December of last year, a group of researchers investigated whether they could replace a key species of good bacteria known as bifidobacterium infantis in the guts of babies who lacked them. They could, but found that when they did so the pH of those infantsí stools changed drastically, becoming more acidic. Adding those bifidobacterium back made the infantsí guts more normal, so the researchers presumed that a lower stool pH might indicate a gut full of the right microbes.

    To figure that out, the researchers looked back at studies from 1926 to 2017 that had analyzed the pH of infant stool (apparently, scientists have been interested in the pH of infant stool for a while) to see if they could identify any trends. The results, published last week in the journal mSphere, show that over the past 100 years, infant stool pH has gone up (meaning that it has become more basic)óchanging from an average reading of 5.0 to 6.5. (For reference, the more acidic something is, the lower its pH and the more basic, the higher the pH. Pure water is a neutral 7.0).
    That seems like a small increase, but itís actually quite significant for a scale that only goes from zero to 14. But okay, our babiesí poop pH has gone up. Is that such a big deal?

    The researchers think that this change in pH could be because we have slowly lost that specific strain of bacteria, bifidobacterium, from our guts. Since mothers pass their gut microbiomes on to their babies when they are born, its disappearance in an adult can lead to a brood of bifidobacterium-less kids.

    ďWe put this paper together as a call to action to let them know that there has been a major shift in this fecal pH,Ē says co-author Bethany Henrick, a researcher at Evolve BioSystems, a biomedical company in Davis, California.

    But whatís so special about bifidobacterium? According to Henrick and her co-author Jennifer Smilowitz, a nutritional biologist at the University of California, Davis, this type of bacteria binds exclusively to human milk oligosaccharides, which are sugars found only in breast milk. The bacteria use these sugars as food so they can grow and reproduce. Once theyíve taken over the gut (which is normal for the first few years of life) they essentially prevent bad bacteria, like pathogens that make us sick, from taking up residence in the gut.

    When we donít have enough bifidobacterium, these bad bacteria keep getting in, says Smilowitz. Our immune systems then have to then fight them off, which researchers think might be why some people go on to develop allergies and certain autoimmune diseases,óoften characterized by an overactive or indiscriminate immune system. Around 80 percent of the cells that make up our immune systems are in our guts.ďThereís this intimate connection between the gut microbiome and our immune system,Ē says Henrick.

    Recent studies have supported this idea, showing that young children followed through their first years of life are more likely to develop autoimmune diseases if they lack substantial amounts of the right bacteria. But thereís still a lot we donít know.
    Jack Gilbert, director of the Microbiome Center at the University of Chicago, agrees that the observed change in pH is an interesting observation, and one that fits the current understanding that bifidobacterium lowers stool pH. But, he says, the relationship between a babyís poop pH, the amount of the bifidobacterium in their guts, and whether they have human milk oligosaccharides (from their momís milk) hasnít been untangled yet. In other words, we still arenít 100 percent sure that bacteria are driving the change in pH. However, he says, this study and others are absolutely leaning that way.

    If it does prove causal, the researchersí ultimate goal is to get this bacterial strain back into all of our babiesí guts. And they think the only way to do that is to use supplements at birth. But before that happens, more research is needed to understand what exactly constitutes a healthy microbiome: Which strains of bacteria should be in our guts and at what times?

    We need more research, more questions, and of course, more poop.
    But for now, how can you keep your microbiome (and your infantís) healthy? Research is beginning to show that as babies develop their microbiomes, three big factors influence which bacteria grow: How often a baby gets antibiotics, if they are breastfed, and whether they were delivered via cesarean section or through natural birth. All of these things can influence a developing microbiome, though it is still unclear by what degree and whether one is more influential than the other.
    Doctors and new moms can try to help nurture a healthy microbiome in their youngins by limiting the use of antibiotics and cesarean sections when possible. Breastfeeding might help, too, but this isnít always possible or practical. Studies like thisóthat help us understand what a healthy microbiome is and what conditions foster oneómight eventually enable us to help those infants who require antibiotics early in life or whose mothers arenít able to breastfeed.

    As for us adults, eating a healthy diet full of fiber is essential. Our microbes love themselves some roughage.


    This article has been updated to reflect the fact that the pH scale ranges from 0 to 14, not 0 to 10. We regret the error.
    tags: microbiome poop babies gut health gut microbes public health

  2. #2
    They're always pushing high ph water as being less acidic is considered healthy. Or so they think.

  3. #3
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    this type of bacteria binds exclusively to human milk oligosaccharides, which are sugars found only in breast milk. The bacteria use these sugars as food so they can grow and reproduce. Once they’ve taken over the gut (which is normal for the first few years of life) they essentially prevent bad bacteria, like pathogens that make us sick, from taking up residence in the gut.


    In other words--(even though THEY DON'T WANT TO SAY IT because IT ISN'T PC)--



    BREASTFEEDING


    led to healthier babies


    and healthier adults



    But today's "I AM WOMAN" is ENTIRELY too busy being EVERYTHING to bother with THAT..(yuk).................
    Be not soon shaken in mind, or be troubledÖLet no man deceive you by any meansÖ..
    they received not the love of the truth, that they might be savedÖ.for this cause God shall send them strong delusion, that they should believe a lieÖ.
    Nevertheless we, according to his promise, look for new heavens and a new earth, wherein dwelleth righteousness.


  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Countrymouse View Post
    this type of bacteria binds exclusively to human milk oligosaccharides, which are sugars found only in breast milk. The bacteria use these sugars as food so they can grow and reproduce. Once theyíve taken over the gut (which is normal for the first few years of life) they essentially prevent bad bacteria, like pathogens that make us sick, from taking up residence in the gut.

    In other words--(even though THEY DON'T WANT TO SAY IT because IT ISN'T PC)--

    BREASTFEEDING

    led to healthier babies

    and healthier adults


    But today's "I AM WOMAN" is ENTIRELY too busy being EVERYTHING to bother with THAT..(yuk).................
    I don't know how you assume that. Lots of women breastfeed. I did, and I worked at the same time. It's not hard.
    So when's the Revolution? God or Money? Choose.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by mzkitty View Post
    I don't know how you assume that. Lots of women breastfeed. I did, and I worked at the same time. It's not hard.
    I am going by what I hear from the millennails.

    Most do NOT plan to breastfeed, and if they try it they aren't planning to do it for more than the 6 weeks of maternity leave.

    That's so pitiful they may as well not try.

    My pediatrician said a MINIMUM of a YEAR on breast-milk was needed, and kids preferably, if you can swing it, should stay on breastfeeding up to 18 months, to insure a good immune system.

    It's well-nigh IMPOSSIBLE to keep up one's breastmilk and work an 8-hour a day job. Even using a breast-pump and freezing it, it's likely the milk will dry up between the 4th and 6th month, because (unless you have your baby with you there at work to nurse every few hours) no breast-pump is going to provide the necessary stimulation to keep the mlik going. Plus--the stress of the job, plus the lack of hydration (nursing moms need to drink COPIOUS amounts of water)---it's virtually guaranteed you'll only be able to keep it up a few months at most (this is presupposing a normal 8-hour shift job).
    Be not soon shaken in mind, or be troubledÖLet no man deceive you by any meansÖ..
    they received not the love of the truth, that they might be savedÖ.for this cause God shall send them strong delusion, that they should believe a lieÖ.
    Nevertheless we, according to his promise, look for new heavens and a new earth, wherein dwelleth righteousness.


  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Countrymouse View Post
    I am going by what I hear from the millennails.

    Most do NOT plan to breastfeed, and if they try it they aren't planning to do it for more than the 6 weeks of maternity leave.

    That's so pitiful they may as well not try.

    My pediatrician said a MINIMUM of a YEAR on breast-milk was needed, and kids preferably, if you can swing it, should stay on breastfeeding up to 18 months, to insure a good immune system.

    It's well-nigh IMPOSSIBLE to keep up one's breastmilk and work an 8-hour a day job. Even using a breast-pump and freezing it, it's likely the milk will dry up between the 4th and 6th month, because (unless you have your baby with you there at work to nurse every few hours) no breast-pump is going to provide the necessary stimulation to keep the mlik going. Plus--the stress of the job, plus the lack of hydration (nursing moms need to drink COPIOUS amounts of water)---it's virtually guaranteed you'll only be able to keep it up a few months at most (this is presupposing a normal 8-hour shift job).
    Everybody is different. I breastfed longer than 18 months (but he was eating food by then too). I know you won't believe it, but I trained my body not to let down milk until I got home.
    So when's the Revolution? God or Money? Choose.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by mzkitty View Post
    Everybody is different. I breastfed longer than 18 months (but he was eating food by then too). I know you won't believe it, but I trained my body not to let down milk until I got home.
    You must have been very young, or were very fortunate.

    I had my first child at 36 and my last at nearly 41.\

    I was home, full-time.


    And even drinking 8-10 glasses a day and RELIGIOUSLY following my mid-wife's suggested diet, it was all I could do to keep my milk going. And any stress made it that much worse. I even had to supplement with vitamins and herbs like Milk Thistle to keep things going. And though I did try to express and freeze milk, it never smelled or tasted the same (even after being frozen) and the babies wouldn't drink it.

    Everybody's different, but by and large every book I've read about the issue says what I experienced was pretty close to the norm.

    I'm glad you had a better experience than most.
    Be not soon shaken in mind, or be troubledÖLet no man deceive you by any meansÖ..
    they received not the love of the truth, that they might be savedÖ.for this cause God shall send them strong delusion, that they should believe a lieÖ.
    Nevertheless we, according to his promise, look for new heavens and a new earth, wherein dwelleth righteousness.


  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Countrymouse View Post
    You must have been very young, or were very fortunate.

    I had my first child at 36 and my last at nearly 41.\

    I was home, full-time.


    And even drinking 8-10 glasses a day and RELIGIOUSLY following my mid-wife's suggested diet, it was all I could do to keep my milk going. And any stress made it that much worse. I even had to supplement with vitamins and herbs like Milk Thistle to keep things going. And though I did try to express and freeze milk, it never smelled or tasted the same (even after being frozen) and the babies wouldn't drink it.

    Everybody's different, but by and large every book I've read about the issue says what I experienced was pretty close to the norm.

    I'm glad you had a better experience than most.
    Well, I wish you'd had a better experience. I was just about 40 when I had my one and only. The stuff just gushed out. My sister couldn't get the hang of it, and her daughter liked the bottle better anyway. I felt like a cow at the time, LOL. Don't have any idea why my experience was like that. Just the way I was built, I guess. I didn't question it.

    So when's the Revolution? God or Money? Choose.

  9. #9
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    Me too. Breast fed and worked full time. Two kids, both for at least two years. My one trick was day care close by. Went there for lunch. I was pathetic with pumping.

  10. #10
    Nearly every Mom I have been close to that didn't breastfeed had a very good reason for not doing so; in one case yes she was a single Mom who refused both an abortion and the suggestion of the local welfare officer that she just "quit her job and go on welfare like everyone else."

    But mostly it was breast infections, inflammation, not enough milk etc; my friend that lived here when her first daughter was born had her breasts turn bright red and she reported that the pain was worse than giving birth. Our old hippie doctor finally got her to switch to a bottle because the baby started losing weight as it couldn't get enough to eat; being told she was a "bad Mom" by people outside the situation didn't help - daughter is about to turn 18 and is doing fine.

    Now on the gut biome thing, this does not surprise me and is right up there with studies showing the nutrition levels in some foods have gone down by NINETY PERCENT since the 1930s.

    If anything, with what medicine is discovering the importance of gut bacteria and human health; it may be the more important discovery of the two.

    It may also be the easier one to try and cope with - a sane society that wanted healthy children would look at this an immediately start encouraging and even enabling pregnant women to get as many good sources of gut bacteria as possible - eating a lot of "live" yogurt and other fermented products and perhaps even taking concentrated pills.

    Getting the "live" stuff into Mom who shares her food with her growing infant makes more sense than trying to add it in after birth; it would also be worth a good study to see if the change in diet would help Mom's produce milk that had the missing bacteria, which would help most women and their babies (and babies using milk banks).

    I get really tired of hearing about women who "refuse to nurse" because somehow they are feminists or something; in reality these days the women I know who don't breastfeed usually have tried to do so first and have a good reason not to; which can include working a job that helps feed their kids; but that's different from wanting to "have it all" in a "career."
    expatriate Californian living in rural Ireland with husband, dogs, horses. garden and many, many cats

  11. #11
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    Breastfeeding has been on the rise for several decades- data shows that babies who started breastfeeding increased from 71 percent in 2000 to 77 percent in 2010.

    And today's young mothers are very much into breastfeeding; it is both trendy & healthy

  12. #12
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    I wonder about the push for a more antiseptic environment. I was one of the last "dirt don't hurt" generations I believe. We stayed dirty as kids. We used to play "cow pie frisbee". It always degenerated to full blown "new pile" slinging.
    The generation before me saw babies left in a washtub at the end of the corn rows with a piece of bacon fat to gnaw on. Baby was checked each time mom hoed back to that end of the patch.

    I became Daddy late in life but I know mine was kept from most "biodiversity" even here on the farm. I would freak out when I caught the little one chewing on the trash can as a toddler. She was just the right height and I guess it looked perfect to her. DW was highly entertained by my antics to prevent such acts.
    "You are allowed to be disappointed but not surprised"

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Luddite View Post
    I wonder about the push for a more antiseptic environment. I was one of the last "dirt don't hurt" generations I believe. We stayed dirty as kids. We used to play "cow pie frisbee". It always degenerated to full blown "new pile" slinging.
    The generation before me saw babies left in a washtub at the end of the corn rows with a piece of bacon fat to gnaw on. Baby was checked each time mom hoed back to that end of the patch.

    I became Daddy late in life but I know mine was kept from most "biodiversity" even here on the farm. I would freak out when I caught the little one chewing on the trash can as a toddler. She was just the right height and I guess it looked perfect to her. DW was highly entertained by my antics to prevent such acts.




    HAHAHAHA


    thumbelina (middle kid) cured me of any remaining "ick" squirminess. fezzik jr did pretty ok on being normal, but when there is just one, you can catch stuff easier. when they are two, and very close together, you miss lots of stuff hahaha.


    thumbelina seemed to be on a mission to get the most gross and disgusting stuff she could down that gullet. after i found her absolutely covered in and eating cat poop like they were baby ruths in the sandbox, that broke me. LOL


    the dr says our kids had a high occurrence of putting things in their mouth. she said that is a good thing, just to make sure they don't choke. and cat poop will not kill you
    float like a butterfly...

  14. #14
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    Oh, Hunybee, reading your post, I felt that fuzzy feeling and got the tunnel vision that comes right before fainting.

    Most of us drank some unpasteurized milk, unfiltered well or spring water, and had no space age laconic or ionic air filters as children. I wonder if the third world babies have the same issues as those discussed in the OP?

    ETA: This overly simplistic question bothers me: What causes strength in an organism or bodily system? USE
    The lack of the good organisms mentioned may be from lack of the bad organisms.
    The huge increase in immune system malfunctions may well be from the lack of random exposure to the bad germs.
    When our immune system finally activates it goes from neutral past DRIVE to OVERDRIVE with the pedal to the floor.

    Do we ever get a "control" group of more naturally exposed people? Do migrants exposed to chicken pox randomly get shingles? Psoriasis? I'm not one of the die-hard anti-vaxers but I think immune system issues are complex. Knowing how much those shingles and psoriasis tv commercials cost leads me to know money plays a factor in what we see and hear, even from scientists.

    Also, my knucklehead can't see where c-section or natural birth could have ANY influence.
    Last edited by Luddite; 02-12-2019 at 07:57 AM.
    "You are allowed to be disappointed but not surprised"

  15. #15
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    We have lost out traditions of eating a little fermented foods during a meal. We have over-medicated our kids with antibiotics when they were not needed, without providing a way for they kids to restore their gut microbiome afterwords. Babies born with a cesaerian section also don't get exposed to the right bacteria at birth, so some way of creating a supplement for them is needed to kick-start their gut bacteria.
    Scientists are learning that our microbiome is more important than ever and might effect our brain chemistry if it's off balance,. not to mention digestive issues and diseases.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by lostinaz View Post
    We have lost out traditions of eating a little fermented foods during a meal. We have over-medicated our kids with antibiotics when they were not needed, without providing a way for they kids to restore their gut microbiome afterwords. Babies born with a cesaerian section also don't get exposed to the right bacteria at birth, so some way of creating a supplement for them is needed to kick-start their gut bacteria.
    Scientists are learning that our microbiome is more important than ever and might effect our brain chemistry if it's off balance,. not to mention digestive issues and diseases.

    Science is relearning the naturopath ways of the 1930-50s

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